Any thing wrong with using AF-C permanently?

Started Apr 25, 2013 | Discussions
cwsiggy
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Re: All
In reply to harpo95993, Apr 27, 2013

harpo95993 wrote:

cwsiggy wrote:

Ok, I must be missing something real simple but why would you ever want to implement something that causes one to have to press 2 buttons instead on just one?

Why not just learn to half depress the shutter release button and keep it half pressed to recompose? rather than having to press the AF ON button and then release the shutter.

Yes- I'm new to owing a D7100, but clearly I seem to be missing something here...

Read this thread it explains everything.

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2917220#forum-post-37104695

thanks - will do.

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cwsiggy
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Re: Many
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 27, 2013

Mako2011 wrote:

cwsiggy wrote:

Ok, I must be missing something real simple but why would you ever want to implement something that causes one to have to press 2 buttons instead on just one?

Because I can focus and not have VR draining the battery or making noise if I choose to. Also, VR can make you sea sick at times so when I shoot hummingbirds at 200mm I often prefer pre-exposure VR off while the image itself is benefited from VR at the time of capture.

Why not just learn to half depress the shutter release button and keep it half pressed to recompose?

See above

rather than having to press the AF ON button and then release the shutter.

You get all the benefits of focus-recompose in AF-C

Yes- I'm new to owing a D7100, but clearly I seem to be missing something here...

It takes time and practice to notice/understand many of the benefits. Most who get used to and good with back-button focus, never go back to shutter release focus.

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and thank you... couldn't figure out how to quote both and thank all at once.. lol

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Brev00
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Re: All
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 27, 2013

Mako2011 wrote:

Brev00 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

Yes, VR still works at the time of the shot.  Yes you can still get VR with a shutter button half-press.  What is the point of using the AF-ON button, if you still have to half-press the shutton button?

You do not have to half press the shutter button to get VR...You do have to fully press the shutter button to take the picture...when you do that, VR engages and works as always to mitigate the effects of camera shake.

Obviously, many of you don't realize how much easier VR make INITIAL FOCUS ACQUISITION WITH A LONG LENS.   For me, none.  AND, still promotes a weak grip.

That is indeed another use for VR...but not required for the shot.

I don't understand this reply.  If Master Potter uses vr (os) to help acquire initial focus with his Bigma, then he requires it.

Sure it helps him hold steady, but it is not required to get the camera shake reduction benefits to the capture.

I would think that using os only at the precise moment of capture would decrease his keeper rate or, at least, entail a continuous shooting style.

Not really as VR completely resets at the moment the mirror starts to rise so keeper rate should not change.

I wasn't referring to the vr interfering with the image acquisition.  I was trying to say that because the end of the lens moves slightly during firing, without vr the framing slightly shifts making the odds of getting the intended frame lower and, to a degree, more random.  This only matters if the original framing is a vital component of the final image.  With cameras like the D800 and D7100, there are pixels to burn.  Shoot wide and crop.  With my mere 12 mp, I try to maintain my frame.  I don't know what M.P.'s style is in regards to the original frame (kinda sounds like a Supreme Court issue).

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Mako2011
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Re: All
In reply to Brev00, Apr 27, 2013

Brev00 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

Brev00 wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

nfpotter wrote:

Yes, VR still works at the time of the shot.  Yes you can still get VR with a shutter button half-press.  What is the point of using the AF-ON button, if you still have to half-press the shutton button?

You do not have to half press the shutter button to get VR...You do have to fully press the shutter button to take the picture...when you do that, VR engages and works as always to mitigate the effects of camera shake.

Obviously, many of you don't realize how much easier VR make INITIAL FOCUS ACQUISITION WITH A LONG LENS.   For me, none.  AND, still promotes a weak grip.

That is indeed another use for VR...but not required for the shot.

I don't understand this reply.  If Master Potter uses vr (os) to help acquire initial focus with his Bigma, then he requires it.

Sure it helps him hold steady, but it is not required to get the camera shake reduction benefits to the capture.

I would think that using os only at the precise moment of capture would decrease his keeper rate or, at least, entail a continuous shooting style.

Not really as VR completely resets at the moment the mirror starts to rise so keeper rate should not change.

I wasn't referring to the vr interfering with the image acquisition.  I was trying to say that because the end of the lens moves slightly during firing, without vr the framing slightly shifts making the odds of getting the intended frame lower and, to a degree, more random.

Except at the moment you try and take the shot...VR resets and the lens is recenter. What you last saw in the viewfinder may not be what the sensor first sees. I does help though in many ways to have VR help with panning and framing.  No denying that.

This only matters if the original framing is a vital component of the final image.  With cameras like the D800 and D7100, there are pixels to burn.  Shoot wide and crop.  With my mere 12 mp, I try to maintain my frame.  I don't know what M.P.'s style is in regards to the original frame (kinda sounds like a Supreme Court issue).

Too cool.  Lots of tech going on!

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pixelless
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AF-C + AF-ON is all I need!
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 27, 2013

Like others on this thread, I only use AF-C with the AF-ON button. That way I have both (AF-C and AF-S) without having to mess with one more setting.

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JacquesC
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Very true
In reply to Ray Soares, Apr 29, 2013

Ray Soares wrote:

and with the D7000 and now with my D4!

IMO there are some misconceptions about this matter:

1- In the new bodies ( D4 / D800 /D7100 ) the VR is now activated when you press  AF-ON, which is a much better implementation by Nikon IMO

2- Also with the D4 ( dunno with other bodies ) you've got the AFC plus 1 single focus point which is excelent for details and small DOF situations (as sometimes using the 9/21/51 points options, the camera could for example focus in eyelashes instead of the iris)

3-In the D7000 I truly believe that the AFC algorithyms were more acurate than the AFS ones at least with its first firmware

4- Working with lenses at up to f/2.8  and wide open is the most critical situation where I believe AFC will help as,  with a DOF of let's say a quarter of a inch, it is easy to miss CRITICAL focus due to slight movements of both you and your target

5- And of course AFC is a better option IMO when ANY movement is present, even in the so called posed portraits when your target always moves or when yourself is breathing or slightly moving as we all do when handhelding cameras

6- At f/5.6 and smaller apertures small movements of course will not be a great  issue

7- I usually shoot at a 3 pic burst to catch later the best one as any AF system has some calibration & normal allowances that can sometimes induce it to lock in a not so perfect and critical focus ( easy to see when using for example the FOCAL software for fine-tunning lenses and then displaying the results on a graphic ). In this case AFC will help a lot as movements are more likely to happen between the 3 shots (that is of course also valid in continuous action shooting).

8- And last but not least I also believe that the less you need to change settings when different situations appear during a photo session, the lower the chances you've got to forget something or even to do wrong things ...

Your mileage may vary though...

Best

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Ray Soares
See my pictures at www.pbase.com/raysoares

Amen to all of the above!

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Jacques
apple-and-eve.com

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