Do you print with the intent to view under certain lighting?

Started Apr 23, 2013 | Discussions
ranalli
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Do you print with the intent to view under certain lighting?
Apr 23, 2013

I'm probably splitting hairs at this point(maybe not from a pro standpoint) but finding it hard to see the value in having a calibrated monitor, etc if when I get the prints back they look too warm when viewed under most lighting conditions.

I got some prints back and they look great but I thought they were a bit warm looking and compared to my monitor they were...but obviously only under the incandescent 100 watt bulbs I have in my office.  When I put them under this "BlueMax" lamp I have(suppose to mimic sunlight more or less) they were very close to what I see on my monitor even with regards to contrast.

Do people just ignore this discrepancy since it seems minor or do they try to compensate?  I tried to compensate with some settings in Lightroom to get them to look the same under incandescent but seems a bit more than simply warmth is affected by a simple light change.

Any ideas/opinions on this?

Thanks in advance.

E Dinkla
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Re: Do you print with the intent to view under certain lighting?
In reply to ranalli, Apr 23, 2013

Where possible (known display conditions) I first make proofs to similar lighting. For photography in general given the usual display conditions a somewhat warmer viewing light than 5000-5500K is wise, a Solux near 4000K for example. Use papers with no or a lower OBA content too, so not the coolest papers you can find. There are papers that have a high white reflection based on other components than Optical Brightening Agents. They have more paper white constancy in different light conditions and so "metamerism" will happen less in the image too. Have a piece of your usual framing glass around too and check its influence at 2mm distance on the print with the display light you expect. Water white glass (no iron content) will give the best transparency and light transmission so need the least adapation. Normal window - cheap framing glass cuts a bit of UV already, has a green cast and a lower light transmission. Any effective UV light cutting glass for protection will tend to be yellow and nullify the fluorescence/reflection effect of OBA papers. Acrylic glazing exists with a variety of optical properties too.

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digital ed
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Always
In reply to ranalli, Apr 24, 2013

ranalli wrote:

I'm probably splitting hairs at this point(maybe not from a pro standpoint) but finding it hard to see the value in having a calibrated monitor, etc if when I get the prints back they look too warm when viewed under most lighting conditions.

I got some prints back and they look great but I thought they were a bit warm looking and compared to my monitor they were...but obviously only under the incandescent 100 watt bulbs I have in my office.  When I put them under this "BlueMax" lamp I have(suppose to mimic sunlight more or less) they were very close to what I see on my monitor even with regards to contrast.

Do people just ignore this discrepancy since it seems minor or do they try to compensate?  I tried to compensate with some settings in Lightroom to get them to look the same under incandescent but seems a bit more than simply warmth is affected by a simple light change.

Any ideas/opinions on this?

Thanks in advance.

nt

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Alpha Doug
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Re: Always
In reply to digital ed, Apr 24, 2013

Actually, it sounds like your monitor, probably by accident, is pretty close on.  When I print, using a color calibrated system, I check the prints under a 5000K fluorescent light, pointed downward, next to my monitor.  This seems to work just fine.  However..... All prints will look somewhat different depending on the lighting conditions.  If they are in daylight, they will be close on to what I described above, but looking at them in 2300-2900 Kelvin Incandescent lighting will make them seem warm (the reflected orange light from the incandescents).  That's why galleries try to use color balanced or "neutral" lighting.

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Hugowolf
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Re: Do you print with the intent to view under certain lighting?
In reply to ranalli, Apr 24, 2013

For my own work I do. If I have a show/exhibition, then I will scout out the location and see what lighting is there and how it is arranged.

There are always problems, and usually mixed lighting of some sort. I had a show in a small space about a year ago, which is only open during daylight hours normally, but the opening was at night. Lots of north facing daylight during regular hours, not so during the opening – and the vast majority of sales occur at the opening. I went with hard proofing under daylight.

Brian A

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ranalli
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Re: Do you print with the intent to view under certain lighting?
In reply to E Dinkla, Apr 24, 2013

E Dinkla wrote:

Where possible (known display conditions) I first make proofs to similar lighting. For photography in general given the usual display conditions a somewhat warmer viewing light than 5000-5500K is wise, a Solux near 4000K for example. Use papers with no or a lower OBA content too, so not the coolest papers you can find. There are papers that have a high white reflection based on other components than Optical Brightening Agents. They have more paper white constancy in different light conditions and so "metamerism" will happen less in the image too. Have a piece of your usual framing glass around too and check its influence at 2mm distance on the print with the display light you expect. Water white glass (no iron content) will give the best transparency and light transmission so need the least adapation. Normal window - cheap framing glass cuts a bit of UV already, has a green cast and a lower light transmission. Any effective UV light cutting glass for protection will tend to be yellow and nullify the fluorescence/reflection effect of OBA papers. Acrylic glazing exists with a variety of optical properties too.

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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst
500+ inkjet paper white spectral plots: OBA content etc.
http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm

Thank you and everyone in this thread.  The prints are fine and match my monitor when viewed under the "right" light, however, this is something to consider when showing my work.

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digital ed
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Re: Always
In reply to Alpha Doug, Apr 24, 2013

Alpha Doug wrote:

Actually, it sounds like your monitor, probably by accident, is pretty close on.  When I print, using a color calibrated system, I check the prints under a 5000K fluorescent light, pointed downward, next to my monitor.  This seems to work just fine.  However..... All prints will look somewhat different depending on the lighting conditions.  If they are in daylight, they will be close on to what I described above, but looking at them in 2300-2900 Kelvin Incandescent lighting will make them seem warm (the reflected orange light from the incandescents).  That's why galleries try to use color balanced or "neutral" lighting.

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Only my opinion. It's worth what you paid for it. Your mileage may vary! ;-}
www.dougwigton.com/

The original question was if anyone printed for the value of lighting under which the print is to be viewed. My answer was always. Prints never look exactly like the monitor shows no matter how well calibrated it is. There is always the difference between monitor illumination and print reflectivity. I always do test prints (just like I did with the chemical processes) for evaluation before the final print is done. Actually, there may be more than one final print and adjustment depending upon where the print is to be viewed and my changing view of how I want it to look. I am seldom completely happy with a print as there is always something that can be done to improve it.

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Charles2
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Brightness of the light matters as much as color temperature (n/t)
In reply to ranalli, Apr 24, 2013

n/t

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E Dinkla
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Re: Brightness of the light matters as much as color temperature (n/t)
In reply to Charles2, Apr 25, 2013

Charles2 wrote:

n/t

and can not be separated from color temperature.

Kruithof curve:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kruithof_curve

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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst
500+ inkjet paper white spectral plots: OBA content etc.
http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm

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