BXRI set up

Started Apr 19, 2013 | Discussions
Tadd
New MemberPosts: 16
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BXRI set up
Apr 19, 2013

I have 2 BXRI 500's

Playing yesterday I was able to light the white backdrop with one and the subjet with the other while using some 285's to fill.  Would a reflector work better than the 285's?

I have been thining of adding another strobe but have been "dwelling" on which one for fill. I would like to stop some action in the studio so am intrigued with the BXRI250 flash durration.  What I don't know is if I use that one with my 500's slower flash durration am I negating the gain with the 250? In otherwords what happens when you mixk flash durrations for main and fill light.  Backdrop should not matter as much I beleive.

Should I just add another 500? or dlite for fill? Can I stop enough action like tossing a bolleyball to someone with the 500's duration?

I know I am rambling with questions just trying to figure out my next move to improve the studio.

Thanks for the advice

Peter Berressem
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Re: BXRI set up
In reply to Tadd, Apr 19, 2013

Tadd wrote:

I have 2 BXRI 500's

while using some 285's to fill.  Would a reflector work better than the 285's?

No common answer possible: you have to try and decide.

I have been thining of adding another strobe but have been "dwelling" on which one for fill. I would like to stop some action in the studio so am intrigued with the BXRI250 flash durration.  What I don't know is if I use that one with my 500's slower flash durration am I negating the gain with the 250? In otherwords what happens when you mixk flash durrations for main and fill light.  Backdrop should not matter as much I beleive.

The slowest flash in the set determines the grade of motion blur, even if it lights "just" the BG. I'd rather get another 250 for it's significantly shorter duration.

> Can I stop enough action like tossing a bolleyball to someone with the 500's duration?

That's borderline. Even the shorter 1/2700 (t 0.5 at full power) of the BRX 250 may be too slow when you consider that the real action stopping flash duration is measured at t 0.1. (Roughly 3 times longer = 1/850s.) Depends of course a lot on how meticulous you are in judging the result...

This is also a matter of the relative orientation of the movement: worst case = fastest if it's lateral to the camera axis, slower if it's along the axis.

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cheers, Peter
Germany

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Tadd
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Re: BXRI set up
In reply to Peter Berressem, Apr 19, 2013

would I be better off mixing lights and going to an AB einstien? Are those faster lights?

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Peter Berressem
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mixing brands
In reply to Tadd, Apr 19, 2013

Tadd wrote:

would I be better off mixing lights and going to an AB einstien?

Mixing brands? I'd avoid it as the modifiers aren't compatible, leading to constant hassle.

Are those faster lights?

Much faster when the output is reduced to 400Ws (and lower).

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cheers, Peter
Germany

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Tadd
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Re: mixing brands
In reply to Peter Berressem, Apr 19, 2013

OK I hear ya on the modifiers but they all make adapters and such to go with.  In fact PCB makes some with rings specific to Elinchrom.  Or are you saying the color temp is different? That can be handled with a simple white balance (should do that anyway).

For motion I am not asking to stop water - though it is way cool you can do that I am just looking to maybe toss a ball to someone and freeze it in the air - this is a toss not a fastball. Will the BXRI500 I have stop it? If not would I be best served to get a bxri250 to stay in the Elinchrom family and stop this action or should I mix to an Einstine for those situations.  I would like to get a 3rd for fill light and stop using shoe flashes as fill or backdrop illumination - its a pain.

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Sailor Blue
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Re: BXRI set up
In reply to Tadd, Apr 20, 2013

First, use your studio strobes for your subject lighting and keep the hot-shoe flash for background, hair, and accent lights.  Zooming the hot-shoe flash is a nice way of controlling the spread of light, many times eliminating the need for a snoot or grid.

If you don't want to mix studio strobes and hot-shoe flash units then buy more of the BXRI lights.  Buy the same ones so you have backups.

For stopping motion forget your studio strobes and use your hot-shoe flash units.  You may need to up the ISO to 800-1600 but you can pretty much eliminate the noise in post processing.  If you just don't get enough light from your current 285s then add some more and use a 3 or 4 hot-shoe bracket.

ebay - New 3 Triple Head Hot Shoe Flash Holder Bracket Light Stand For Canon Nikon

ebay - CowboyStudio 4 Way Flash Shoe Bracket/Umbrella Holder Stand Mount w/ 4 Hot Shoe

Don't use the studio strobes for the background if you are using hot-shoe flash to stop fast moving subjects.  You can wind up with the background being visible through an edge of the subject since the subject is moving in front of the background and the background is being lit by the longer flash of the studio strobes.

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Living and loving it in Bangkok, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

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