lighting question

Started Apr 7, 2013 | Discussions
RG16
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lighting question
Apr 7, 2013

Hi,

Ive recently taken some beginner classes and im very interested

in buying a small beginner lighting kit and backdrops. I would really

like to start off with continuous (fluorescent) lights and some soft

boxes. After looking at website after website and reading reviews

I'm probably more confused than ever.  I am planning to

use set up in my home for babies, toddlers, families and

pets.  Which manufacturer is consistently good, with decent

equipment for a good price?  Will 2000 watts be sufficient

or can I go lower?  thanks for any input!

hotdog321
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Re: lighting question
In reply to RG16, Apr 7, 2013

"Babies, toddlers, families and pets?!!!!"

You NEED to invest in strobes! These squirmy, fast-moving subjects would be a nightmare to shoot otherwise. One or two 400 w/s strobes put out enormous amounts of light that let you use lots of depth of field plus you can freeze action. Seriously.

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Sailor Blue
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Re: lighting question
In reply to RG16, Apr 8, 2013

I agree with hotdog321, you NEED strobes, not continuous lighting.

Studio strobes in the 300 Ws to 400 Ws range will allow you to use medium sized softboxes or umbrellas and shoot at ISO 100 and f/8.

Two studio strobes is a good way to start but you can do a lot with only one if you are budget limited.

Zack Arias - One Light Workshop • Photography By Zack Arias

I made the mistake of buying cheaply priced studio strobes the first time.  They were crap quality and didn't even have speedring attachment points.  They quickly wound up in the trash - a complete waste of my money.

I wrote the following article to help others like you avoid my costly mistake.  Please read it before buying any studio equipment.

Sailorblue - Digital Photography Review - Equipment Guide for Setting up a Small Home Portrait/Glamor Studio

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RG16
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Re: lighting question
In reply to hotdog321, Apr 8, 2013

thanks for the info

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RG16
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Sailor Blue, Apr 8, 2013

thanks so much for your input!

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Barrie Davis
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Re: lighting question
In reply to RG16, Apr 8, 2013

RG16 wrote:

Hi,

Ive recently taken some beginner classes and im very interested

in buying a small beginner lighting kit and backdrops. I would really

like to start off with continuous (fluorescent) lights and some soft

boxes. After looking at website after website and reading reviews

I'm probably more confused than ever.  I am planning to

use set up in my home for babies, toddlers, families and

pets.  Which manufacturer is consistently good, with decent

equipment for a good price?  Will 2000 watts be sufficient

or can I go lower?  thanks for any input!

You need flash for photographing people and animals.

Note: It would be helpful if you went back to your DPR profile and entered your COUNTRY of residence. Then we could refer to it when considering which equipment would likely be available where you are.

As it is, you haven't given us a clue where you are in the world, so we have no idea what you might be able to buy locally

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Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

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Klaus dk
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Barrie Davis, Apr 9, 2013

Barrie Davis wrote:

[...]
Note: It would be helpful if you went back to your DPR profile and entered your COUNTRY of residence. Then we could refer to it when considering which equipment would likely be available where you are.

As it is, you haven't given us a clue where you are in the world, so we have no idea what you might be able to buy locally

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

Don't be silly Barrie, he's in the US. If he weren't, he would write where he is.

+1 on flash.

If you really are in the US, Alien Bees or Paul C Buff Einsteins is your way to go.

If you want low price, learn from the strobist who uses inexpensive battery flashes. The modeling lights of strobes is an advantage, but one gets the hang of it with time - I hope.

 Klaus dk's gear list:Klaus dk's gear list
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Barrie Davis
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Klaus dk, Apr 10, 2013

Klaus dk wrote:

Barrie Davis wrote:

[...]
Note: It would be helpful if you went back to your DPR profile and entered your COUNTRY of residence. Then we could refer to it when considering which equipment would likely be available where you are.

As it is, you haven't given us a clue where you are in the world, so we have no idea what you might be able to buy locally

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

Don't be silly Barrie, he's in the US. If he weren't, he would write where he is.

+1 on flash.

If you really are in the US, Alien Bees or Paul C Buff Einsteins is your way to go.

If you want low price, learn from the strobist who uses inexpensive battery flashes. The modeling lights of strobes is an advantage, but one gets the hang of it with time - I hope.

It helps greatly, when working with battery flashes without modelling lights...

... if one has previously gained experience with studio flash that DID have them. In fact, that is an understatement... it helps enormously.

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

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Sailor Blue
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Klaus dk, Apr 10, 2013

Klaus dk wrote:

Barrie Davis wrote:

[...]
Note: It would be helpful if you went back to your DPR profile and entered your COUNTRY of residence. Then we could refer to it when considering which equipment would likely be available where you are.

As it is, you haven't given us a clue where you are in the world, so we have no idea what you might be able to buy locally

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

Don't be silly Barrie, he's in the US. If he weren't, he would write where he is.

And from the "dk" in your user name I assume you are from Germany.

See why it is important to let us know where you are from?

+1 on flash.

-10 on hot-shoe flash.

Portraiture is all about highlights and shadows to give the face a 3D appearance and to flatter the subject by sculpting the face with light.

Studio strobes have modeling lights that lets the photographer "see the light".  Hot-shoe flash units don't.  Beginners NEED to be able to see the light - heck even the most experienced portrait photographers use studio strobes with modeling lights to make sure they get the lighting right.

Frankly, unless you have many years of experience you are kidding yourself if you think that you can set up a portrait session with hot-shoe flash units and hit the lighting without going through a dozen test shots.  Joe McNally might be able to do it but he is one of the very few in the world, and he uses studio strobes in his studio.

Joe McNally’s Blog

If you really are in the US, Alien Bees or Paul C Buff Einsteins is your way to go.

Here we agree.  The best bang for the buck, but get Einsteins if you can afford them.

If you want low price, learn from the strobist who uses inexpensive battery flashes. The modeling lights of strobes is an advantage, but one gets the hang of it with time - I hope.

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Bangkok, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

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Klaus dk
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Sailor Blue, Apr 10, 2013

Sailor Blue wrote:

Klaus dk wrote:

Barrie Davis wrote:

[...]
Note: It would be helpful if you went back to your DPR profile and entered your COUNTRY of residence. Then we could refer to it when considering which equipment would likely be available where you are.

As it is, you haven't given us a clue where you are in the world, so we have no idea what you might be able to buy locally

-- hide signature --

Regards,
Baz
:
"Ahh... But the thing is, these guys were no ORDINARY time travellers!"

Don't be silly Barrie, he's in the US. If he weren't, he would write where he is.

And from the "dk" in your user name I assume you are from Germany.

See why it is important to let us know where you are from?

+1 on flash.

-10 on hot-shoe flash.

Portraiture is all about highlights and shadows to give the face a 3D appearance and to flatter the subject by sculpting the face with light.

Studio strobes have modeling lights that lets the photographer "see the light".  Hot-shoe flash units don't.  Beginners NEED to be able to see the light - heck even the most experienced portrait photographers use studio strobes with modeling lights to make sure they get the lighting right.

Frankly, unless you have many years of experience you are kidding yourself if you think that you can set up a portrait session with hot-shoe flash units and hit the lighting without going through a dozen test shots.  Joe McNally might be able to do it but he is one of the very few in the world, and he uses studio strobes in his studio.

Joe McNally’s Blog

If you really are in the US, Alien Bees or Paul C Buff Einsteins is your way to go.

Here we agree.  The best bang for the buck, but get Einsteins if you can afford them.

If you want low price, learn from the strobist who uses inexpensive battery flashes. The modeling lights of strobes is an advantage, but one gets the hang of it with time - I hope.

-- hide signature --

Living and loving it in Bangkok, Thailand. Canon 7D - See the gear list for the rest.

Easy now, Sailor

If you would care to look up my profile, you would see I'm in Denmark, so there's no need to place me in Germany (which is de, btw). But sarcasm was once again misunderstood in a post - I thought it was so thick, that anybody would see it, but obviously that was not the case. I think that most members here, who does not disclose their country of residence, does not imagine there's a world outside of the US developed enough to know about photography

I use studio strobes myself for portraiture of exactly the reasons you mention. You always warn posters here against buying cheap strobes, and I totally agree, but if budget is an issue, you are IMHO better served with battery flashes than with continuous lights or cheap strobes. YMMV.

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Sailor Blue
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Re: lighting question
In reply to Klaus dk, Apr 11, 2013

Klaus dk wrote:

Easy now, Sailor

If you would care to look up my profile, you would see I'm in Denmark, so there's no need to place me in Germany (which is de, btw).

Guilty as charged.  My apology for getting your country wrong.  Your right, I should have checked your profile, not just relied on my memory for the country code.

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