First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm

Started Apr 4, 2013 | Discussions
richj20
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First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
Apr 4, 2013

I've had this lens for about a month, and just now had a chance to use it away from home.  I spent about 2 weeks in the Sequoia National Forest, California, up along the Kern River - North Fork. My goal with this lens was to find as many different types of scenes as possible to see how it would respond.

The lens balances very well on the Panasonic G3. The zooming action is damped nicely. The lens is a pleasure to use.

I hiked along some of the tributaries that feed into the Kern River. This one, Brush Creek, is near Johnsondale, north of Kernville, in the Sequoia National Forest. Spring has not yet shown its spectacular colors, and the brownish-wintry look of dormant grasses has special beauty all its own.

Late March is very early Spring up there, and I was anxious to see what was beginning to bloom.
The Fiddleneck -- named for the violin's neck shape of the plant -- is an early bloomer in the Sierras.

Fiddleneck, Amsinckia sp.

Emerging flower pods are always beautiful.

Milkweed,  Asclepias speciosas

This sparrow blended in with leaves of a similar color:

The popular California Poppy

Golden Poppy, Eschscholzia californica

One of the Cherry species in the area

Chokecherry,  Prunus sp.

Roots of Willows and a few other species turn reddish-brown in water. Here, a small stream flowing into a lake on a Ranch in the Sequoia National Forest.

Kids enjoying an outing on this lake.

California Gray Squirrels are all over the area.

Wrangler on the Ranch

Kayak enthusiast on the Kern River

Many species of Lichen are found on rocks and trees up here.

The entire collection is Here

- Richard

FrankParis
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 4, 2013

Really superb images! Love to see more.

I love this lens, also. Couldn't take it off my E-M5 for several days, then put it on my E-PM1 for more fun. How to you like the feel of the plastic mount? Smooth as silk! If it holds up, they should make all mounts out of plastic like Olympus does.

Edit: just noticed your HERE. I'm off to look!

2nd edit: as soon as I went HERE, I saw I was responding to the wrong lens! My comments are for the Olympus 40-150mm. I should trash this post, but I still really like your images, and now I'm back to HERE.

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Aleo Veuliah
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 4, 2013

Very good pictures, liked much. Good detail, composition is fine and colors are natural.

Well done.


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vincent filomena
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 4, 2013

Very nice presentation: Thanks !

Vjim 

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Peter Del
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 4, 2013

I particularly like the last one and played around with it in Elements, I hope you don't mind.

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GeorgianBay1939
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 5, 2013

richj20 wrote:

I've had this lens for about a month, and just now had a chance to use it away from home.  I spent about 2 weeks in the Sequoia National Forest, California, up along the Kern River - North Fork. My goal with this lens was to find as many different types of scenes as possible to see how it would respond.

The lens balances very well on the Panasonic G3. The zooming action is damped nicely. The lens is a pleasure to use.

I hiked along some of the tributaries that feed into the Kern River. This one, Brush Creek, is near Johnsondale, north of Kernville, in the Sequoia National Forest.
Emerging flower pods are always beautiful.

Milkweed,  Asclepias speciosas

The popular California Poppy

Golden Poppy, Eschscholzia californica

The entire collection is Here

- Richard

Thanks a lot for posting those great images!  It gives us, up North with snow tonight, hope that SPRING, must be coming one of these months!

The second reason is that it gives a learner , like myself, a set of standards to try for.

I went HERE and thoroughly enjoyed your work in all 4 collections.

Although I enjoyed your "people" images I am especially interested in your flower images, exemplified by the two above,  as I intend to learn how to do that this spring with my GH 2.  (I use my 14-140 mm a lot, but also use the PL 45mm, the Panny 20mm and the Panny 7-14 mm when appropriate.)

I took the liberty of downloading This Shot of Asclepias speciosas and checking the EXIF more fully.  We have several Asclepias spp here in (snowy) Northern Ontario and I hope to capture some pix of some that remain on my old farm.  From the EXIF of this shot and others I see that you (often) extend the lens to 150mm shoot around f/9 at (often) 1/640 sec in centre weighted exposure mode.  I assume RAW.

This shot, like many others, illustrates your fine control of focus and DOF.   In this case you nailed the buds with the open sepals as well as the fuzzy nature of the closed buds and leaves in the mid background.

I assume that you are using the EVF to expose, compose, focus and shoot.

Do you AFS then tweak it in MF using the half press?  1 Area (one spot) focus?

There is some sort of DOF preview on my GH 2 that I have never used.  Is that a worthwhile feature to  learn?

Many thanks for posting a bit of spring.  I look forward to your advice.

Tom

PS   I can remember driving from Mojave to Bakersfield in December 2005 and coming down from the hills towards Bakersfield.  A few hours drive south of your visit last week.  Beautiful country!!

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to FrankParis, Apr 5, 2013

FrankParis wrote:

Really superb images! Love to see more.

Hello, Frank,

Thanks for the compliment. I'm working on a short travelogue and may post some more later.

2nd edit: as soon as I went HERE, I saw I was responding to the wrong lens! My comments are for the Olympus 40-150mm. I should trash this post, but I still really like your images, and now I'm back to HERE.

Don't feel bad! I did the same thing a couple of months ago in another thread!

I had the Olympus 40-150mm lens prior to getting this Panasonic lens. I wanted OIS, which I've found useful.

- Richard

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to Aleo Veuliah, Apr 5, 2013

Aleo Veuliah wrote:

Very good pictures, liked much. Good detail, composition is fine and colors are natural.

Well done.

Thanks, Aleo. Yes, I like the "natural" (what ever that means!) of colors with the G3. This is a personal observation, of course.

- Richard

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to vincent filomena, Apr 5, 2013

vincent filomena wrote:

Very nice presentation: Thanks !

Vjim 

Thanks, Vincent. I'm glad you enjoyed them.

- Richard

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to Peter Del, Apr 5, 2013

Peter Del wrote:

I particularly like the last one and played around with it in Elements, I hope you don't mind.

Ha! Not at all. Abstractions work in many ways. Different "points of view," if you will.

When I first encountered the artwork of Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Joan Miró and others, I used to turn the book sideways and upside down to see the effects of viewing the painting from a different viewpoint.

- Richard

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to GeorgianBay1939, Apr 5, 2013

GeorgianBay1939 wrote:

Thanks a lot for posting those great images!  It gives us, up North with snow tonight, hope that SPRING, must be coming one of these months!

It will come, that's for sure -- Be patient!

I went HERE and thoroughly enjoyed your work in all 4 collections.

Thank you, Tom. I'm glad you enjoyed them. I had a lot of fun photographing up there.

Although I enjoyed your "people" images I am especially interested in your flower images, exemplified by the two above,  as I intend to learn how to do that this spring with my GH 2.  (I use my 14-140 mm a lot, but also use the PL 45mm, the Panny 20mm and the Panny 7-14 mm when appropriate.)

Flowers are my principal interest. I also use the PL 45mm macro, but now only for the tiny tots, or when wanting to magnify.

I took the liberty of downloading This Shot of Asclepias speciosas and checking the EXIF more fully.  We have several Asclepias spp here in (snowy) Northern Ontario and I hope to capture some pix of some that remain on my old farm.

Please post some. That genus is one of my favorites, and I'd like to see some different species!

From the EXIF of this shot and others I see that you (often) extend the lens to 150mm shoot around f/9 at (often) 1/640 sec in centre weighted exposure mode.  I assume RAW.

RAW + JPG. Most of the time with flowers, I use the JPG - the quality from today's cameras is wonderful. I'll use the RAW when needing to adjust white balance, or deal with noise, which isn't often with flowers.

I like the longer focal length because it affords a nicer control of separation of the flower from the background.

This shot, like many others, illustrates your fine control of focus and DOF.   In this case you nailed the buds with the open sepals as well as the fuzzy nature of the closed buds and leaves in the mid background. Do you AFS then tweak it in MF using the half press?  1 Area (one spot) focus?

For the Asclepias and a few other flowers where there is quite a distance from front to rear, I use MF, often on a tripod.

My tests revealed that the camera will often focus past the front element of the flower. So, I manually focus on the protruding element, using f/8 - f/10 to get everything within DOF, as in the buds, in the Asclepias, and the front petal in the Eschscholzia.

The common hibiscus can present this problem, where getting the protruding stamen in focus, and in this case, the leaves in the front, isn't always successful with AF:

A difficult scene is this tree orchid, Bauhinia purpurea. Several attemps with AF were not successtul:

I assume that you are using the EVF to expose, compose, focus and shoot.

Actually, not! I rarely use the EVF. I prefer holding the camera at chest or waist level, using the flipout LCD to compose. It just feels much more comfortable. When on a tripod, there is a lot of pleasure in taking time to compose with the LCD. I think this goes back to my years when I had a View Camera.

I have a small focusing cloth attached to my wide brim hat, and I can flip the cloth down over the LCD to block light. With no light hitting the screen, the image and colors display beautifully. It also aids in very precise manual focusing.

In non-flower work, for example, in the Kayak series on the Kern River: I positioned myself on the bank above the river, in front of white water areas. I was sitting on the ground with the camera resting on my knee and the LCD flipped open, just waiting for the right moment.

If I need to point and shoot quickly, I'll use the EVF. But that's not my favorite type of photography.

There is some sort of DOF preview on my GH 2 that I have never used.  Is that a worthwhile feature to  learn?

I've used the DOF preview, but now, I can pretty much know what the DOF will be for closeups of flowers. But it is a useful tool, that's for sure!

Having said all of the above in answer to your questions, I encourage you to experiment and develop your own methodology. You seem to have done that with your snow pictures, which are quite nice!

PS   I can remember driving from Mojave to Bakersfield in December 2005 and coming down from the hills towards Bakersfield.  A few hours drive south of your visit last week.  Beautiful country!!

Yes, indeed. The desert is a spectacular place.

Thanks again for taking the time to write your observations.

- Richard

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Guy Parsons
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 5, 2013

Same here, did first trip with 45-150mm on E-PL5 but spent most time with 14-45mm and did not work the 45-150mm much, but enough to see that it is a good lens.

Works fine for me because the E-PL5 can use the unswitched OIS. The better build and metal mount inspires a bit more confidence, plus the supplied lens hood and centre pinch lens cap and the fact it has 52mm filter thread makes it fit in with my other lenses better. (9-18mm and 14-45mm both 52mm threads).

Just now testing across the room and with E-PL5 custom menu item C lens IS priority = on plus SCP S-IS = 1 and I can get 8 out of 10 success with 1/15 and 1/20 sec shots hand-held at 150mm. Nice.

(Note to Oly E-PL5/E-PM2 users, you do need the IBIS on to then get the priority of the lens unswitched OIS working, the shaky preview at say 150mm and 2x digital  teleconverter turns to a nice steady display, so Oly E-PL5/E-PM2 users can get a stabilised preview which does not happen with any other Pen).

The Raynox 250 +8 dioptre works spectacularly well giving better than 1:1 macro plus no vignetting at all through the whole zoom range, but a saner +3 dioptre Nikon 4T is easier to use.

Plus of course in Australia the 45-150mm was cheaper than the Oly 40-150mm when I bought it last December.

Regards....... Guy

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Ulric
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 5, 2013

What lovely spring pictures.

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GeorgianBay1939
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 5, 2013

richj20 wrote:

GeorgianBay1939 wrote:

Thanks a lot for posting those great images!  It gives us, up North with snow tonight, hope that SPRING, must be coming one of these months!

It will come, that's for sure -- Be patient!

I went HERE and thoroughly enjoyed your work in all 4 collections.

Thank you, Tom. I'm glad you enjoyed them. I had a lot of fun photographing up there.

Although I enjoyed your "people" images I am especially interested in your flower images, exemplified by the two above,  as I intend to learn how to do that this spring with my GH 2.  (I use my 14-140 mm a lot, but also use the PL 45mm, the Panny 20mm and the Panny 7-14 mm when appropriate.)

Flowers are my principal interest. I also use the PL 45mm macro, but now only for the tiny tots, or when wanting to magnify.

I took the liberty of downloading This Shot of Asclepias speciosas and checking the EXIF more fully.  We have several Asclepias spp here in (snowy) Northern Ontario and I hope to capture some pix of some that remain on my old farm.

Please post some. That genus is one of my favorites, and I'd like to see some different species!

From the EXIF of this shot and others I see that you (often) extend the lens to 150mm shoot around f/9 at (often) 1/640 sec in centre weighted exposure mode.  I assume RAW.

RAW + JPG. Most of the time with flowers, I use the JPG - the quality from today's cameras is wonderful. I'll use the RAW when needing to adjust white balance, or deal with noise, which isn't often with flowers.

I like the longer focal length because it affords a nicer control of separation of the flower from the background.

This shot, like many others, illustrates your fine control of focus and DOF.   In this case you nailed the buds with the open sepals as well as the fuzzy nature of the closed buds and leaves in the mid background. Do you AFS then tweak it in MF using the half press?  1 Area (one spot) focus?

For the Asclepias and a few other flowers where there is quite a distance from front to rear, I use MF, often on a tripod.

My tests revealed that the camera will often focus past the front element of the flower. So, I manually focus on the protruding element, using f/8 - f/10 to get everything within DOF, as in the buds, in the Asclepias, and the front petal in the Eschscholzia.

The common hibiscus can present this problem, where getting the protruding stamen in focus, and in this case, the leaves in the front, isn't always successful with AF:

A difficult scene is this tree orchid, Bauhinia purpurea. Several attemps with AF were not successtul:

I assume that you are using the EVF to expose, compose, focus and shoot.

Actually, not! I rarely use the EVF. I prefer holding the camera at chest or waist level, using the flipout LCD to compose. It just feels much more comfortable. When on a tripod, there is a lot of pleasure in taking time to compose with the LCD. I think this goes back to my years when I had a View Camera.

I have a small focusing cloth attached to my wide brim hat, and I can flip the cloth down over the LCD to block light. With no light hitting the screen, the image and colors display beautifully. It also aids in very precise manual focusing.

In non-flower work, for example, in the Kayak series on the Kern River: I positioned myself on the bank above the river, in front of white water areas. I was sitting on the ground with the camera resting on my knee and the LCD flipped open, just waiting for the right moment.

If I need to point and shoot quickly, I'll use the EVF. But that's not my favorite type of photography.

There is some sort of DOF preview on my GH 2 that I have never used.  Is that a worthwhile feature to  learn?

I've used the DOF preview, but now, I can pretty much know what the DOF will be for closeups of flowers. But it is a useful tool, that's for sure!

Having said all of the above in answer to your questions, I encourage you to experiment and develop your own methodology. You seem to have done that with your snow pictures, which are quite nice!

PS   I can remember driving from Mojave to Bakersfield in December 2005 and coming down from the hills towards Bakersfield.  A few hours drive south of your visit last week.  Beautiful country!!

Yes, indeed. The desert is a spectacular place.

Thanks again for taking the time to write your observations.

- Richard

Thank you very much for your very useful comments, Richard!  Lots of new stuff to try.

I used the LCDs on my first digital cameras, then on the GF 1, but my eyes aren't as good as they used to be and I find that adjusting the dioptre on the EVF is more convenient that using my spectacles with the LCD.  But I am going to try again, especially with a tripod ... with a focusing cloth.

Thanks for your encouragement.   Yes, I tend to want to learn the basics and then to develop my personal techniques.  That kinda guy, I guess.

I also like milkweeds, especially when the Monarchs are about.  My son has a big patch on his property on Manitoulin Island.  I will get some images to you this summer.

In the meantime here are some shots from my property from last May. You will recognize the species.

Maybe not this particular species:

Aquilegia canadensis

Probably not this one also!

P. pennsylvanica

And probably not this one also ....

Corydalis sempervirens

I recall taking pix of monarchs last summer at my son's place.

Aha!  Not on milkweed but on Dogbane:

Apocynum cannabinum  I think.  With horsetails in the background.

I detect that you are a botanist in addition to being a photographer.  I had a devil of a time finding images in my collection that isolated the bloom from the rest of the plant.  From now on I will take two images of each plant ..... a botanical specimen shot c/w leaves etc and a  more artistic shot with good isolation of the inflorescence.

Thanks a lot for your help.  I will try to find some Ontario, Canada, milkweeds for you in a few months!!

Tom

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LudwigVB
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to FrankParis, Apr 6, 2013

FrankParis wrote:

Really superb images! Love to see more.

I love this lens, also. Couldn't take it off my E-M5 for several days, then put it on my E-PM1 for more fun. How to you like the feel of the plastic mount? Smooth as silk! If it holds up, they should make all mounts out of plastic like Olympus does.

Edit: just noticed your HERE. I'm off to look!

2nd edit: as soon as I went HERE, I saw I was responding to the wrong lens! My comments are for the Olympus 40-150mm. I should trash this post, but I still really like your images, and now I'm back to HERE.

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Frank Paris

I thought the mount of the 45-150mm lens was made of metal.

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tedolf
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Nicely done.....
In reply to richj20, Apr 6, 2013

I would crop out the top 1/5 of the first photo.

No 10 is the best by far.

Tedolph

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richj20
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to Ulric, Apr 6, 2013

Ulric wrote:

What lovely spring pictures.

Thanks, Ulric, it's a beautiful area in which to photograph.

- Richard

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Atwater
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Re: First trip with the Panasonic 45-150mm
In reply to richj20, Apr 6, 2013

Thanks for posting Richard.  I enjoyed the set.

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richj20
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Re: Nicely done.....
In reply to tedolf, Apr 6, 2013

tedolf wrote:

I would crop out the top 1/5 of the first photo.

I have several versions from this angle, including a crop of the lower level, from a couple of years ago in late summer:

No 10 is the best by far.

That is Sylvester, a very cooperative model. Sylvester lives high up in a Ponderosa Pine next to the cabin I was staying in, and in early morning when I went out, he would come down, hoping for a handout:

- Richard

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tedolf
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Re: Nicely done.....
In reply to richj20, Apr 6, 2013

richj20 wrote:

tedolf wrote:

I would crop out the top 1/5 of the first photo.

I have several versions from this angle, including a crop of the lower level, from a couple of years ago in late summer:

I lke this much better.

No 10 is the best by far.

That is Sylvester, a very cooperative model. Sylvester lives high up in a Ponderosa Pine next to the cabin I was staying in, and in early morning when I went out, he would come down, hoping for a handout:

- Richard

But does he have the Tedolph Mind Control Chip implant?

Tedolph

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