D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem

Started Apr 3, 2013 | Discussions
scokill
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Re: not a camera issue
In reply to Whalligeo, Apr 3, 2013

Whalligeo wrote:

The above is an old Jedi trick I was taught a long time ago. I was shown the dark side and mastered the art of color management and high end monitors. The light saver of adobe is useless without knowledge. Much study you must, books many will teach.

Regards the best of,

Yoda

All the best

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They said it couldn't be done, so I encouraged my peers not to bother.

Very nice.  Also if you are looking for a problem you will find it.  I'm reminded of a saying "the man who has limburger cheese under his nose thinks the whole world stinks"

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sandy b
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Monitors, just found something interesting
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 3, 2013

At work I have a 24"dell connected to my dell laptop, screen extended from my 24" to the laptop. If I hang the op pic so that is half on the 24 and half on the laptop, the 24 looks great and the laptop greenish. BTW, the laptop is coreI7 vPro with 16 gig, 2 months old. And it certainly need calibration.

Conclusion? Nothing wrong with the camera, calibrate the monitors.

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mosswings
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Re: not a camera issue
In reply to scokill, Apr 3, 2013

scokill wrote:

Whalligeo wrote:

The above is an old Jedi trick I was taught a long time ago. I was shown the dark side and mastered the art of color management and high end monitors. The light saver of adobe is useless without knowledge. Much study you must, books many will teach.

Regards the best of,

Yoda

All the best

-- hide signature --

They said it couldn't be done, so I encouraged my peers not to bother.

Very nice.  Also if you are looking for a problem you will find it.  I'm reminded of a saying "the man who has limburger cheese under his nose thinks the whole world stinks"

Yep. Nice.

The dark side it is that foiling you must be.

Rudy, do you have a White Balance card?  It's a very useful device for moving your investigations out of the world of cant and guesses into the world of science.  Whenever the light is questionable, it can give you a reference for the proper setting of your picture's color balance either in camera or in postprocessing.  All you do is take a picture of your subject with the white balance card in it, then sample the image of the white balance card, and define it as your reference tone.  The D7100 allows you to do this in a couple of ways - Liveview white balance sampling, and white balance reference image.  Really precise types will invest in a Colorchecker matrix and generate a camera color profile for their postprocessing program which goes even further.

All of this, of course, presumes that you do one essential thing: manually set white balance.  Automatic white balance is only accurate over a fairly narrow range of lighting conditions - roughly from 4000-6500 Kelvin, which encompasses flash, sunny daylight, and early morning or late afternoon.  Anything else, including incandescent light, reflected light off of colored walls, etc., needs your personal attention.

Your wife's picture is in very tricky lighting.  Direct sunlight off her hair, face in shadows, bright piece of furniture immediately behind her face.  What's the right thing for an AWB algorithm to choose here?  And further, the white balance for each of those areas can differ.

After a while, you get to recognize suitable portions of the scene for white balancing and metering, and don't usually need the aid of a white balance card.  I always carry one but have rarely had to use it. Once one gets the hang of the AWB algorithms in one's camera, or stores a set of custom white balance settings that one likes, it becomes less of an issue, and you can let the camera do its thing, knowing that you know how to correct it in post.

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RicohPentax
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Re: not a camera issue
In reply to mosswings, Apr 3, 2013

I have to ask, is this a joke? Nikons have a history of green shadows? This is the first I have heard of that one. Even a quick Google or Bing search will show that is not a common complaint by any means. Do you have Landscape mode on?

There is a certain hysteria that involves every digital camera that comes out. Oil splatters, bad for moving objects, hot pixels, hot metering, back focus, autofocus hunting, scratching the sensor, soft images, etc. Then there is the hysteria with future cameras and the photosite size and density.

If you do not like the color rendition of your camera, change it in the settings, or get a different brand.  Same with metering, handling, focus, or any other challenge anybody has. All cameras are a trade off between price, features, quality and handling. Find what makes you happy and go with it.

All that being said, your camera is fine. The pictures are fine.

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vkyr2
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Re: I do see a lot of green ...
In reply to sandy b, Apr 3, 2013

... but seriously not in the OP's image, his image looks pretty fine and common normal toned to me!

Well maybe I should stop drinking too much of that stuff in future!

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Valentino

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RyanBoston
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Re: D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem
In reply to RudyPohl, Apr 3, 2013

RudyPohl wrote:

UtenteMac wrote:

Same here, either the problem is in your eyes or your color managed workflow. 

Thanks for your reply.

How do account for the fact that the same images viewed on the same monitor look great in Photoshop, but look terrible in View NX2 and on Flickr?

By the way, we own a desktop publishing/graphics/web design/video production company and work only on high-end, calibrated monitors.

Also, if it's not a problem why do so many people say it is?

Rudy

Sounds like you have AdobePro Photo on as a color space on in your camera. It should be on sRGB for the colors too look normal on VNX2 and Flickr.

I tested this issue years back.

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RudyPohl
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Re: D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem
In reply to RyanBoston, Apr 4, 2013

RyanBoston wrote:

RudyPohl wrote:

UtenteMac wrote:

Same here, either the problem is in your eyes or your color managed workflow. 

Thanks for your reply.

How do account for the fact that the same images viewed on the same monitor look great in Photoshop, but look terrible in View NX2 and on Flickr?

By the way, we own a desktop publishing/graphics/web design/video production company and work only on high-end, calibrated monitors.

Also, if it's not a problem why do so many people say it is?

Rudy

Sounds like you have AdobePro Photo on as a color space on in your camera. It should be on sRGB for the colors too look normal on VNX2 and Flickr.

I tested this issue years back.

Hi Ryan:

Yes, it appears that you have probably nailed it as did another member who sent me a private message earlier today suggesting the same thing. That is in fact the setting for the color space that I had selected thinking that this was the correct choice since I would be working in Adobe Photoshop. As I recall, this is what the manual instructed me to do in making this choice.

Thanks for this info.

Rudy

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Daniel R Ripplinger
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Re: ditto
In reply to fotolopithecus, Apr 4, 2013

I see the green and my monitor is usually ok. I have also noticed the green tint in other D7100 shots. I hope this gets resolved as I wish to purchase this camera, but that would break the deal.

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sandy b
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Its not the camera
In reply to Daniel R Ripplinger, Apr 4, 2013

I looked the image on two monitors at the same time,  a laptop and with the desktop extended on to a 24 inch dell. On the 24" the image looked great, no green at all. Drag it on to the laptop screen and it looked decidedly more green.

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mosswings
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Re: Its not the camera
In reply to sandy b, Apr 4, 2013

sandy b wrote:

I looked the image on two monitors at the same time,  a laptop and with the desktop extended on to a 24 inch dell. On the 24" the image looked great, no green at all. Drag it on to the laptop screen and it looked decidedly more green.

Sandy, rendering accuracy depends upon whether your monitors are calibrated properly and can handle the color space. Laptop monitors are usually SRGB and not color managed, so throwing an aRGB image at them will wind up with color errors.  Your 24" Dell is likely aRGB.

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vkyr2
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In reply to sandy b, Apr 4, 2013

The OP's image uses an embedded AdobeRGB color profile and thus has been created with that enhanced wider gamut color space! - So it's pretty normal that this image will look color wise slightly different on low gamut vs. wide gamut color space monitors.

Every body with a better monitor or bigger notebook screen (one with a wide gamut TFT panels which nearly or fully supports the AdobeRGB color space) will see probably a normal color toned image here. But those with plain sRGB gamut panels might see some tints due to the fact that their screen doesn't fully support that wider gamut color space.

If the OP would convert that image to sRGB then his color tint problems might have gone!

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sandy b
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You are right
In reply to vkyr2, Apr 4, 2013

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/51217548

I have to get my laptop sorted out, its running the 24" monitor on an Intel process and driver, and the 17" laptop on an Nvidia quadro under the montor setings. Need to get them matched.

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RyanBoston
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Re: D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem
In reply to RudyPohl, Apr 4, 2013

RudyPohl wrote:

RyanBoston wrote:

RudyPohl wrote:

UtenteMac wrote:

Same here, either the problem is in your eyes or your color managed workflow. 

Thanks for your reply.

How do account for the fact that the same images viewed on the same monitor look great in Photoshop, but look terrible in View NX2 and on Flickr?

By the way, we own a desktop publishing/graphics/web design/video production company and work only on high-end, calibrated monitors.

Also, if it's not a problem why do so many people say it is?

Rudy

Sounds like you have AdobePro Photo on as a color space on in your camera. It should be on sRGB for the colors too look normal on VNX2 and Flickr.

I tested this issue years back.

Hi Ryan:

Yes, it appears that you have probably nailed it as did another member who sent me a private message earlier today suggesting the same thing. That is in fact the setting for the color space that I had selected thinking that this was the correct choice since I would be working in Adobe Photoshop. As I recall, this is what the manual instructed me to do in making this choice.

Thanks for this info.

Rudy

No problem. I figured it was something simple.

Your pictures looked great and hopefully we don't lose you and see you back in the future!

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thomo
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Re: Set up
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 4, 2013

I think you are correct Mako. When I look at the sample image on my calibrated Eizo CG245W monitor it looks like the image is set for Adobe RGB even though when I switch to sRGB it still looks reasonable, nut compared to the aRGB the sRGB does have a slight cast to it (in comparison).

As you suggested the OP needs to sort out his colour management issues and if you're posting on the 'net then you're wasting your time with aRGB.

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thomo
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Re: Set up
In reply to thomo, Apr 4, 2013

I should have read all three pages of replies - I see it has already been sorted

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shetani
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Re: AdobeRGB
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 4, 2013

I think Mako is absolutly right. On my Laptop Screen , which is able to make use of Adobe RGB and also calibrated , i can not see any green cast in the Picture. When converting into a different colorspace like sRGB IEC you can clearly see how the green channel (and the others to) shifts to the left of the histogram .

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Aaron Shepard
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Re: D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem
In reply to RudyPohl, Apr 4, 2013

On my wide-gamut monitor, this looks greenish. I see it has an sRGB profile. When I downloaded it and assigned it an Adobe RGB profile to replace the sRGB, it looked beautiful.

So, apparently it's an Adobe RGB photo that has been assigned an sRGB profile by mistake. Perhaps the poster does not understand that you must use a Convert to Profile command instead of an Assign Profile command when you want to convert to sRGB for online posting. (At least, those are the names in Photoshop.)

So, to fix this, you would assign an Adobe RGB profile, then convert to sRGB for online posting.

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Whalligeo
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Re: D7100 - I need help solving the "green shadows" in skin tones problem
In reply to Aaron Shepard, Apr 4, 2013

Aaron Shepard wrote:

On my wide-gamut monitor, this looks greenish. I see it has an sRGB profile. When I downloaded it and assigned it an Adobe RGB profile to replace the sRGB, it looked beautiful.

So, apparently it's an Adobe RGB photo that has been assigned an sRGB profile by mistake. Perhaps the poster does not understand that you must use a Convert to Profile command instead of an Assign Profile command when you want to convert to sRGB for online posting. (At least, those are the names in Photoshop.)

So, to fix this, you would assign an Adobe RGB profile, then convert to sRGB for online posting.

It could also be incorrect use of or set-up of proofing. Who knows. But, the OP is accustomed to working with high end calibrated monitors. He says so HERE. I just think its a big mountain made out of a tiny molehill.

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They said it couldn't be done, so I encouraged my peers not to bother.

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Mako2011
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browser?
In reply to Aaron Shepard, Apr 4, 2013

Aaron Shepard wrote:

On my wide-gamut monitor, this looks greenish. I see it has an sRGB profile.

My Browser shows it as a AdobeRGB profile, same as the actual file. What browser are you using?

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mosswings
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In reply to RudyPohl, Apr 4, 2013

RudyPohl wrote:

RyanBoston wrote:

RudyPohl wrote:

UtenteMac wrote:

Same here, either the problem is in your eyes or your color managed workflow. 

Thanks for your reply.

How do account for the fact that the same images viewed on the same monitor look great in Photoshop, but look terrible in View NX2 and on Flickr?

By the way, we own a desktop publishing/graphics/web design/video production company and work only on high-end, calibrated monitors.

Also, if it's not a problem why do so many people say it is?

Rudy

Sounds like you have AdobePro Photo on as a color space on in your camera. It should be on sRGB for the colors too look normal on VNX2 and Flickr.

I tested this issue years back.

Hi Ryan:

Yes, it appears that you have probably nailed it as did another member who sent me a private message earlier today suggesting the same thing. That is in fact the setting for the color space that I had selected thinking that this was the correct choice since I would be working in Adobe Photoshop. As I recall, this is what the manual instructed me to do in making this choice.

Thanks for this info.

Rudy

So, Rudy, have you retrieved that D7100 from your camera store yet?

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