Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!

Started Mar 30, 2013 | Discussions
Sovern
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Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
Mar 30, 2013

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

apaflo
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Sovern, Mar 30, 2013

Sovern wrote:

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

Your blog article lists 5  supposed reasons that ETTR is bad, but all 5 are invalid, and simply wrong to the point of being ridiculous.

Not a good start on trying to teach.

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cjnielsen_nz
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to apaflo, Mar 30, 2013

apaflo wrote:

Sovern wrote:

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

Your blog article lists 5  supposed reasons that ETTR is bad, but all 5 are invalid, and simply wrong to the point of being ridiculous.

Not a good start on trying to teach.

That should have been titled "why trying to teach photography when you have no idea what you are talking about is BAD"

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to apaflo, Mar 31, 2013

apaflo wrote:

Sovern wrote:

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

Your blog article lists 5  supposed reasons that ETTR is bad, but all 5 are invalid, and simply wrong to the point of being ridiculous.

Not a good start on trying to teach.

Can you back up your statement of why my 5 points are wrong?

When shooting a portrait where the sky is involved wouldn't you agree that shooting to the right is bad as your neglecting the lighter details in the photo that are naturally bright such as clouds and the blue sky?

How about flash photography and it creating bad habits?

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to cjnielsen_nz, Mar 31, 2013

Ignorance is bliss. Neither you nor the last poster obviously read the full article as shooting to the right would have resulted in photos with boring over exposed skys that are unrecoverable.

I'd advise beginners to learn how to expose a picture correctly the first time around on a consistent basis than worry about a little noise.

There are many other photographers that would agree that for the most part ETTR is bad on the whole and that shooting with proper exposure the first time around outweighs the +'s of ETTR.

But thanks for voicing your opinions guys.

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Ysarex
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Sovern, Mar 31, 2013

Sovern wrote:

Can you back up your statement of why my 5 points are wrong?

When shooting a portrait where the sky is involved wouldn't you agree that shooting to the right is bad as your neglecting the lighter details in the photo that are naturally bright such as clouds and the blue sky?

How about flash photography and it creating bad habits?

"1. ETTR teaches you how to overexpose an image on a consistent basis leading you more prone to blow highlights that are unrecoverable unintentionally."

Start by getting a proof reader; you mean "leaving" not "leading."

ETTR does not teach you to overexpose. Those of us who practice ETTR are very careful to never blow highlights. I do not clip the highlights in my photos and therefore my photos are not overexposed. By shifting the exposure right to the point just short of overexposure we get best possible results.

"2. ETTR makes pulling down natural bright’s to their proper exposure (the brighter parts of your scene) impossible in most cases."

You need a proof reader if you can't spell. You meant "brights" not "bright's."

No. Again the point of ETTR is to expose so the brights are exposed to just below the sensor's clipping point but never overexposed.

3. ETTR is a one way ride. Always overexposing your photos means that you’re focused on making the dark’s/shadows brighter than they are in reality leading to blown highlights and unrecoverable brights such as a beautiful sky/sunset/or anything else which is naturally bright.

You really need a proof reader; there are multiple errors in item #3.

ETTR is not overexposing. We don't blow highlights. We don't have unrecoverable brights in our photos.

4. ETTR makes flash photography more complicated and even impossible in some cases without blowing the highlights.

No. ETTR applies equally to flash exposure as it does to ambient light exposure.

5. ETTR does not teach you how to read a histogram properly as you’re always focused on overexposing and pulling all of your naturally dark/shadow sections of the histogram to the right neglecting what the proper exposure should be and denying the knowledge that comes from learning how the histogram should look for a specific location/lighting/shot.

No. I'm very clear on what information to take from a histogram and once again ETTR is not overexposing. I do not clip highlights in my photos. ETTR practice does not require overexposing highlights.

___________________________

You should learn how to spell and you should understand what you're criticizing [Mod Edit:  Removed Ad Hominem]. Good luck to you.

Joe

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MarkInSF
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Sovern, Mar 31, 2013

Sovern wrote:

apaflo wrote:

Sovern wrote:

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

Your blog article lists 5  supposed reasons that ETTR is bad, but all 5 are invalid, and simply wrong to the point of being ridiculous.

Not a good start on trying to teach.

Can you back up your statement of why my 5 points are wrong?

When shooting a portrait where the sky is involved wouldn't you agree that shooting to the right is bad as your neglecting the lighter details in the photo that are naturally bright such as clouds and the blue sky?

How about flash photography and it creating bad habits?

I couldn't even find five points.   It's one point repeated, with #4 being slightly different, but so vague I don't even know what it's about.  I may even partially agree with you, but this reads like religious mania, not photography advice.   No beginning photographer is going to be able to make any sense of what you're saying, even if they have been somehow indoctrinated into the ettr cult.  Not that many are.   It's a fairly minor cult.

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bugzie
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Ysarex, Mar 31, 2013

Yes, exposing to the right does not mean blowing the highlights! The problem with the internet is [Mod Edit:  Ad Hominem removed] can write an article without understanding the basic principles of what they're attacking. He is correct however in that if you don't understand how ETTR should work and when it works, you should avoid it. Especially if you think it means over-exposing the highlights!

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Guidenet
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Sovern, Mar 31, 2013

First of all, let me apologize for the name calling. That's just plain mean spirited.

Now, you really should also be more careful about how you go about posting a blog on another site which looks to me as if you don't completely understand what you're attacking. Like Mark, I don't really disagree with ETTR but for somewhat different reasons than you profess. They don't blow highlights for starters and that seems to be a lot of what you're saying.

Also, it's pretty much impossible to "get it right" in the camera. That's an old cliched statement that doesn't really mean much in a digital world where the data is stored as zeros and ones. ETTR people claim they're getting it right. Getting is as close as you can, while understanding your post workflow might be closer to correct, but it doesn't sound as good. It's more accurate though.

Take care and good luck.

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MarkInSF
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Guidenet, Mar 31, 2013

Guidenet wrote:

First of all, let me apologize for the name calling. That's just plain mean spirited.

Now, you really should also be more careful about how you go about posting a blog on another site which looks to me as if you don't completely understand what you're attacking. Like Mark, I don't really disagree with ETTR but for somewhat different reasons than you profess. They don't blow highlights for starters and that seems to be a lot of what you're saying.

Also, it's pretty much impossible to "get it right" in the camera. That's an old cliched statement that doesn't really mean much in a digital world where the data is stored as zeros and ones. ETTR people claim they're getting it right. Getting is as close as you can, while understanding your post workflow might be closer to correct, but it doesn't sound as good. It's more accurate though.

I suppose I should play nicer, too.   I'm sure you are trying to be helpful in writing this article (this is addressed at the OP, not Craig.)   I do think there are legitimate issues to be raised with turning ETTR into a belief system, but it's more like a harmless eccentricity than a cult.  If photographers take good pictures, it doesn't matter much how.

If they have enough time to spend messing with getting the least possible noise, I envy them.   It doesn't look productive to me.  Great images are great because of composition, subject, color relationships, etc. - the same stuff artists were worrying about 500 years ago.   Slightly less noisy shadows are not going to make or break an image for me.  If I were a pro fashion photographer I might feel differently.

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Ysarex, Mar 31, 2013

Ysarex wrote:

Sovern wrote:

Can you back up your statement of why my 5 points are wrong?

When shooting a portrait where the sky is involved wouldn't you agree that shooting to the right is bad as your neglecting the lighter details in the photo that are naturally bright such as clouds and the blue sky?

How about flash photography and it creating bad habits?

"1. ETTR teaches you how to overexpose an image on a consistent basis leading you more prone to blow highlights that are unrecoverable unintentionally."

Start by getting a proof reader; you mean "leaving" not "leading."

ETTR does not teach you to overexpose. Those of us who practice ETTR are very careful to never blow highlights. I do not clip the highlights in my photos and therefore my photos are not overexposed. By shifting the exposure right to the point just short of overexposure we get best possible results.

"2. ETTR makes pulling down natural bright’s to their proper exposure (the brighter parts of your scene) impossible in most cases."

You need a proof reader if you can't spell. You meant "brights" not "bright's."

No. Again the point of ETTR is to expose so the brights are exposed to just below the sensor's clipping point but never overexposed.

3. ETTR is a one way ride. Always overexposing your photos means that you’re focused on making the dark’s/shadows brighter than they are in reality leading to blown highlights and unrecoverable brights such as a beautiful sky/sunset/or anything else which is naturally bright.

You really need a proof reader; there are multiple errors in item #3.

ETTR is not overexposing. We don't blow highlights. We don't have unrecoverable brights in our photos.

4. ETTR makes flash photography more complicated and even impossible in some cases without blowing the highlights.

No. ETTR applies equally to flash exposure as it does to ambient light exposure.

5. ETTR does not teach you how to read a histogram properly as you’re always focused on overexposing and pulling all of your naturally dark/shadow sections of the histogram to the right neglecting what the proper exposure should be and denying the knowledge that comes from learning how the histogram should look for a specific location/lighting/shot.

No. I'm very clear on what information to take from a histogram and once again ETTR is not overexposing. I do not clip highlights in my photos. ETTR practice does not require overexposing highlights.

___________________________

You should learn how to spell and you should understand what you're criticizing before you make a public fool of yourself. Good luck to you.

Joe

Sorry I'm more focused on the discussion of photography and ETTR than grammar.

The problem with ETTR is that when you aim to expose to the right what if you screw up a candid photo due to aiming to shoot ETTR and you blew highlights in your new scene whereas if you stuck with exposing properly you wouldn't have blown anything out?

Also, how would a photographer going about shooting/printing on location and having to shoot right the first time go about using ETTR??? It wouldn;t make any sense because clients would look at their just taken photo and ask you why it's so bright and you don't have the time to worry about not clipping or bringing down the exposure before printing.

Also, how would you mix in ambient and strobes while using ETTR without clipping highlights (especially while using flash) as it would become way more difficult vs getting everything correct on the histogram and the back of the LCD as using ETTR you are bringing up thre ambient right to below clipping point meaning flash enters clipping terrority and trying to figure it all out would lead to nothing but headaches.

I agree that ETTR does have it's place in controlled photography and controlled environments but overall I just stated my personal opinion of why for me ETTR is no good and makes no sense. I prefer consistency in my ability to expose without worrying about other factors.

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to bugzie, Mar 31, 2013

bugzie wrote:

Yes, exposing to the right does not mean blowing the highlights! The problem with the internet is any idiot can write an article without understanding the basic principles of what they're attacking. He is correct however in that if you don't understand how ETTR should work and when it works, you should avoid it. Especially if you think it means over-exposing the highlights!

You forgot to read the part where I mentioned printing on location, showing your photos to your model or client as you're shooting them (they would be too bright to show if shot in RAW and way too bright), you also forgot to mention that shooting in a non controlled environment ETTR becomes a risk especially an event such as a wedding, you also forgot to mention how I mentioned that ETTR can mean making flash photography over complicated.

Sure ETTR does have it's place in controlled environments when you can set the exposure (without worryying about strobes and balancing ambient) and don;t have to change it BUT when shooting with flash or at events or places where exposure needs to be constantly changing in camera and there are candid shots to be taken FOR ME ETTR makes no sense.

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apaflo
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Guidenet, Mar 31, 2013

Guidenet wrote:

First of all, let me apologize for the name calling. That's just plain mean spirited.

I agree with that statement, and would also add that name calling is a violation of the rules we are asked to follow when posting to the DPReview forums.

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/forum-rules

Also, just to let everyone know, it really does have an effect when you click on the complain button.  Moderators see a red flag for that thread, and can then check the specific article and decide how to react.  It's a great help.

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apaflo
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Sovern, Mar 31, 2013

Sovern wrote:

Sorry I'm more focused on the discussion of photography and ETTR than grammar.

That is very reasonable for articles posted to forums... but not for tutorials posted to a blog with the claim that it is instructional for beginners.

The problem with ETTR is that when you aim to expose to the right what if you screw up a candid photo due to aiming to shoot ETTR and you blew highlights in your new scene whereas if you stuck with exposing properly you wouldn't have blown anything out?

No system works if "you screw up".  ETTR is a complex system that targets the idea that, with knowledge and effort in the right circumstance, the results are very precise.

The ETTR method, as a system, is not arbitrary and can very easily produce results that are more accurate than any other system.  However, it requires complex knowledge and it of course only works in the right circumstances.

Acquiring the knowledge is not always possible, and part of that knowledge is knowing when to use ETTR and when not to.

Also, how would a photographer going about shooting/printing on location and having to shoot right the first time go about using ETTR??? It wouldn;t make any sense because clients would look at their just taken photo and ask you why it's so bright and you don't have the time to worry about not clipping or bringing down the exposure before printing.

Shooting "on location" 1) does not mean you have to get it right on the first shutter release, and 2) does not mean clients should be shown partially processed results.

Of course there are situations where those are valid concerns.  And ETTR would not necessarily be appropriate when that is so.  That does not make ETTR the wrong system to use when it is appropriate...

Also, how would you mix in ambient and strobes while using ETTR without clipping highlights (especially while using flash) as it would become way more difficult vs getting everything correct on the histogram and the back of the LCD

Eh?  Using ETTR is "getting everything correct on the histogram".  Doing it without clipping highlights is exactly the purpose!

as using ETTR you are bringing up thre ambient right to below clipping point meaning flash enters clipping terrority and trying to figure it all out would lead to nothing but headaches.

That is not true.  ETTR is not exclusive to ambient light as opposed to flash.  The resulting histogram shows data from flash as well as ambient...

I agree that ETTR does have it's place in controlled photography and controlled environments but overall I just stated my personal opinion of why for me ETTR is no good and makes no sense. I prefer consistency in my ability to expose without worrying about other factors.

There is no doubt whatever that ETTR makes no sense to you.  And without understanding how it works it certainly would not be a good system for you to use.

However, if you would like greater consistency than can be obtained in any other way, try learning how ETTR actually works, and apply it!  It simply amounts to a way to make the most use possible of the technology that is available with a digital camera.  It allows nailing exposure to within 1/10th of an fstop, and short of fudging your definition of "exposure" that cannot be done any other way.

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drh681
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Re: (ETTR) is BAD! But saying so is going to get you a lot of flack
In reply to Sovern, Mar 31, 2013

As you have found.

ETTR was a good Idea back in the early days of digital imaging.

I was there. It was a fair solution.

But that was then, this is now.

And imaging sensors and the accompanying Processing Engines are many, many times better. There has also been an equal improvement in noise reduction capability in our editing programs.

All that adds up to ETTR being a technique that has outlived its practical life.

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to apaflo, Mar 31, 2013

apaflo wrote:

Sovern wrote:

Sorry I'm more focused on the discussion of photography and ETTR than grammar.

That is very reasonable for articles posted to forums... but not for tutorials posted to a blog with the claim that it is instructional for beginners.

The problem with ETTR is that when you aim to expose to the right what if you screw up a candid photo due to aiming to shoot ETTR and you blew highlights in your new scene whereas if you stuck with exposing properly you wouldn't have blown anything out?

No system works if "you screw up".  ETTR is a complex system that targets the idea that, with knowledge and effort in the right circumstance, the results are very precise.

The ETTR method, as a system, is not arbitrary and can very easily produce results that are more accurate than any other system.  However, it requires complex knowledge and it of course only works in the right circumstances.

Acquiring the knowledge is not always possible, and part of that knowledge is knowing when to use ETTR and when not to.

Also, how would a photographer going about shooting/printing on location and having to shoot right the first time go about using ETTR??? It wouldn;t make any sense because clients would look at their just taken photo and ask you why it's so bright and you don't have the time to worry about not clipping or bringing down the exposure before printing.

Shooting "on location" 1) does not mean you have to get it right on the first shutter release, and 2) does not mean clients should be shown partially processed results.

Of course there are situations where those are valid concerns.  And ETTR would not necessarily be appropriate when that is so.  That does not make ETTR the wrong system to use when it is appropriate...

Also, how would you mix in ambient and strobes while using ETTR without clipping highlights (especially while using flash) as it would become way more difficult vs getting everything correct on the histogram and the back of the LCD

Eh?  Using ETTR is "getting everything correct on the histogram".  Doing it without clipping highlights is exactly the purpose!

as using ETTR you are bringing up thre ambient right to below clipping point meaning flash enters clipping terrority and trying to figure it all out would lead to nothing but headaches.

That is not true.  ETTR is not exclusive to ambient light as opposed to flash.  The resulting histogram shows data from flash as well as ambient...

I agree that ETTR does have it's place in controlled photography and controlled environments but overall I just stated my personal opinion of why for me ETTR is no good and makes no sense. I prefer consistency in my ability to expose without worrying about other factors.

There is no doubt whatever that ETTR makes no sense to you.  And without understanding how it works it certainly would not be a good system for you to use.

However, if you would like greater consistency than can be obtained in any other way, try learning how ETTR actually works, and apply it!  It simply amounts to a way to make the most use possible of the technology that is available with a digital camera.  It allows nailing exposure to within 1/10th of an fstop, and short of fudging your definition of "exposure" that cannot be done any other way.

Thanks for the response. I photograph a lot of models, if I showed the overexposed photos using the ETTR technique they would question my ability which could screw with the whole photoshoot.

Also, using ETTR getting a proper ambient and then dialing in your flash to your taste makes everything more complicated as most photographers that use strobes dial in their ambient to what looks good to them on the LCD/Histogram and then they dial in the flash.

You might have to dial in local exposure (on your subject or background) using ETTR making you have to do more PP work.

I agree that ETTR has it's spot and some might prefer it but like I said I do not prefer it.

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to MarkInSF, Mar 31, 2013

MarkInSF wrote:

Sovern wrote:

apaflo wrote:

Sovern wrote:

I see a lot of new photographers learning about exposure and then quickly being told that they should use a method of exposure called Exposing to the Right (or rather, ETTL). I went into depth as to why in my opinion, ETTR is bad, and especially bad for new photographers that want to develop a consistent base for their ability to get correct exposure correctly the first time around with worrying about losing highlights.

Me personally, I believe in getting the exposure/shot correct the first time in the camera and exposing properly versus to the right as many benefits as shown in the article presented below.

http://warrenjrphotography.com/blogs/

This is also the beginning of articles that are aimed at enthusiast/beginning photographers that want to learn more and discuss various techniques, philosophies regarding what gear you need, lighting, and so on.

Thanks for viewing all the best.

Your blog article lists 5  supposed reasons that ETTR is bad, but all 5 are invalid, and simply wrong to the point of being ridiculous.

Not a good start on trying to teach.

Can you back up your statement of why my 5 points are wrong?

When shooting a portrait where the sky is involved wouldn't you agree that shooting to the right is bad as your neglecting the lighter details in the photo that are naturally bright such as clouds and the blue sky?

How about flash photography and it creating bad habits?

I couldn't even find five points.   It's one point repeated, with #4 being slightly different, but so vague I don't even know what it's about.  I may even partially agree with you, but this reads like religious mania, not photography advice.   No beginning photographer is going to be able to make any sense of what you're saying, even if they have been somehow indoctrinated into the ettr cult.  Not that many are.   It's a fairly minor cult.

You must not understand strobe photography than. Many other people understood the article you're one of the first that could not comprehend my points.

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apaflo
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Re: (ETTR) is BAD! But saying so is going to get you a lot of flack
In reply to drh681, Mar 31, 2013

drh681 wrote:

As you have found.

ETTR was a good Idea back in the early days of digital imaging.

I was there. It was a fair solution.

But that was then, this is now.

And imaging sensors and the accompanying Processing Engines are many, many times better. There has also been an equal improvement in noise reduction capability in our editing programs.

All that adds up to ETTR being a technique that has outlived its practical life.

It has exactly the same significance today that it did with earlier DSLR designs.

No matter how good the precessing is for noise reduction, it does better when there is less noise to start with!

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Sovern
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Re: Why Exposing to the Right (ETTR) is BAD!
In reply to Guidenet, Mar 31, 2013

Guidenet wrote:

First of all, let me apologize for the name calling. That's just plain mean spirited.

Now, you really should also be more careful about how you go about posting a blog on another site which looks to me as if you don't completely understand what you're attacking. Like Mark, I don't really disagree with ETTR but for somewhat different reasons than you profess. They don't blow highlights for starters and that seems to be a lot of what you're saying.

Also, it's pretty much impossible to "get it right" in the camera. That's an old cliched statement that doesn't really mean much in a digital world where the data is stored as zeros and ones. ETTR people claim they're getting it right. Getting is as close as you can, while understanding your post workflow might be closer to correct, but it doesn't sound as good. It's more accurate though.

Take care and good luck.

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Cheers, Craig
Follow me on Twitter @craighardingsr : Equipment in Profile

I didn't read any name calling.

But anyways, getting it right to me means getting the exposure as correct as possible leading to less PP work needed. This also makes your workflow easier as you don;t need to fiddle around and figure out what the correct exposure is since you overexposed using ETTR.

I shot a paid event in NY on New Years where we had to print JPEG on location and we had to get it right in the camera....which I did succeed in.

If I shot ETTR I think that my partner managing the prints would have thrown me out and we would of had a lot of angry clients haha.

I'm not attacking it....I'm just stating my opinion of why I personally don't like ETTR that's all :).

All the best.

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Sovern
Contributing MemberPosts: 907
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Re: (ETTR) is BAD! But saying so is going to get you a lot of flack
In reply to drh681, Mar 31, 2013

I agree, I gave ETTR a try but honestly beginners are better off nailing the exposure in their camer as much as possible and learning how the histogram should look in camera for a specific scene vs worrying about keeping everything on the right.

This also keeps you safer from over exposing your photos which is the main thing that I mention that is a con from ETTR (You're more prone to losing your highlights).

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