An old D40x pic taken in 2007 ( caution if @ work )

Started Feb 26, 2013 | Discussions
pierre1
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An old D40x pic taken in 2007 ( caution if @ work )
Feb 26, 2013

This was taken @ Toronto Dundas Square during a public outdoor fashion event in artificial light.

D40x & 80-200 f2.8 af-s. I was fond of the D40x.

Exif can be found here.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8450532@N04/8509828089/in/photostream

PierreD

http://www.pbase.com/matrixone

Nikon D40X
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Deleted-pending
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Perfect skinn tones
In reply to pierre1, Feb 26, 2013

and color reproduction. I wish they kept making DSLRs with CCD sensors, a 18MP CCD FX camera would have been amazing.

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Jared Huntr
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Re: Perfect skinn tones
In reply to Deleted-pending, Feb 27, 2013

FTH wrote:

and color reproduction. I wish they kept making DSLRs with CCD sensors, a 18MP CCD FX camera would have been amazing.

I'm not understanding your statement. Are you commenting on color accuracy or color appeal? Unless you were actually there in person, how do you know the skin tones match reality? If you are referring to appealing skin tones, why can't you tailor your post-processing workflow to output whatever skin tones you prefer, regardless of the type of sensor. Sure, there may be slight differences between Nikon models but Nikon generally stays very consistent to it's particular palette of colors.

The distinction in skin tones that is often made of CCD vs CMOS reminds me of people who mistakenly spot CG created animals or effects in movies when in fact the animal or scene was shot live for real without the use of computers.

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Ricoh GR
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Deleted-pending
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Re: Perfect skinn tones
In reply to Jared Huntr, Feb 27, 2013

Jared Huntr wrote:

FTH wrote:

and color reproduction. I wish they kept making DSLRs with CCD sensors, a 18MP CCD FX camera would have been amazing.

I'm not understanding your statement. Are you commenting on color accuracy or color appeal? Unless you were actually there in person, how do you know the skin tones match reality? If you are referring to appealing skin tones, why can't you tailor your post-processing workflow to output whatever skin tones you prefer, regardless of the type of sensor. Sure, there may be slight differences between Nikon models but Nikon generally stays very consistent to it's particular palette of colors.

The distinction in skin tones that is often made of CCD vs CMOS reminds me of people who mistakenly spot CG created animals or effects in movies when in fact the animal or scene was shot live for real without the use of computers.

this is certainly the reason why all medium format cameras keep using latest CCD technology. Maybe you should read all the complaints in those forums about native cmos tones vs their older ccd cameras, it is a fact but naysayers will just argue against it without even comparing them.

Yes, if you shoot raw, you can apply settings to recover skin detail (blown by the over saturated red gammas), and recover tones, but you must know how to do it and this requires an extra step of work. Also, all my cmos DSLR show blue shadows when pushed, especially in the brown-red underexposed areas, this is typcial cmos behavior. CCD images, in comparison are pure, will not over-saturate any specific color, over or underexposure or shadow recovery are perfectly controlled when recovered.

cmos sensors are cheaper to produce, and better for live view, but also suffer from rolling shutter when recording motion, CCD dont.

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SiPat
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Re: Perfect skin tones
In reply to Jared Huntr, Feb 28, 2013

I have 2 x D40, a D200 (both CCD), a D5000 and D700 (both CMOS). In my experience, the CCD cameras out-perform the CMOS bodies for colour rendition and time saved in PP, for well lit scenes -- I very rarely go over ISO400 so noise is not a problem.

At the end of the day, you just have to get some hands-on experience and doing real-life comparisons before making a purchase.

A few links to the CCD-vs-CMOS debate:

http://www.teledynedalsa.com/imaging/knowledge-center/appnotes/ccd-vs-cmos/

http://dvxuser.com/jason/CMOS-CCD/

http://www.ptgrey.com/support/kb/index.asp?a=4&q=115


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