How to get prints that are like what you see on screen

Started Feb 19, 2013 | Discussions
GreenMountainGirl
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to MarkInSF, Feb 24, 2013

MarkInSF wrote:

'Adobe RGB (1998)' is the name of an ICC profile for your monitor, a common one promoted by Adobe for use in all their applications and elsewhere. It uses the Adobe RGB color space.

Thank you.  I did not realize that this was considered an ICC profile!  Lots to learn...

Susan

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GreenMountainGirl

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MrMojo
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to GreenMountainGirl, Feb 24, 2013

I use a Mac and I don't know how Windows handles printing. But in OS X a print window appears with basic settings. Accessing the paper profiles for my HP 8450 printer requires clicking a button that reveals 8 additional buttons including one labeled "Paper Type/Quality." The drop-down menu lists all the installed paper profiles; that is where I select the kind of paper that I have loaded in the printer.

Usually the printer paper profiles are installed when you install the printer software; sometimes it is necessary to download and install additional paper profiles if you use paper that isn't included with the printer software profiles.

As I wrote earlier, the print results that you describe are likely caused by not selecting an inappropriate paper profile and/or having the color management handled by the application that has opened the image and the printer software simultaneously. Since you used generic Staples paper it is very likely that you haven't selected a proper paper profile. If Staples doesn't have profiles available then you would select a generic profile, if one is listed. But you will get the best results a lot quicker and easier by using Canon paper/paper profiles.

You can also switch between application and printer software color management and see which one does the best job with printing.

There is a lot of info online regarding color management and printing. Here is a link to get you started; do your own Startpage.com search and you will turn up a bunch of hits: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/color-management1.htm.

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GreenMountainGirl
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to MrMojo, Feb 24, 2013

MrMojo wrote:

I use a Mac and I don't know how Windows handles printing. But in OS X a print window appears with basic settings. Accessing the paper profiles for my HP 8450 printer requires clicking a button that reveals 8 additional buttons including one labeled "Paper Type/Quality." The drop-down menu lists all the installed paper profiles; that is where I select the kind of paper that I have loaded in the printer.

Sounds like the Mac works very much like the Windows OS to handle printing.

Usually the printer paper profiles are installed when you install the printer software; sometimes it is necessary to download and install additional paper profiles if you use paper that isn't included with the printer software profiles.

Basic profiles are provided, but not specific ones.  Looking at the printer manual, apparently there is a way to upload additional ones using the original set-up CD.  I will have to get the CD out of my files and investigate further.  I will be buying some Canon paper this week to give it a try.

You can also switch between application and printer software color management and see which one does the best job with printing.

As a matter of fact, after being given some information by Petruska, I have been experimenting with that.  He gave me a link for a standard test photo, and I printed it from the image outside of LR and then imported it into LR, printing with color management on and off.  The best results were from within LR with color management on!  I am looking forward to trying with Canon paper.

There is a lot of info online regarding color management and printing. Here is a link to get you started; do your own Startpage.com search and you will turn up a bunch of hits: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/color-management1.htm.

I have been reading tutorials on CIC, after hearing about it from OP.  It is a good site.  I will have to look into Startpage.com, haven't heard of that one before.

Thanks for your suggestions.  The learning process is slow, but I feel like progress is happening!

Susan

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GreenMountainGirl

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Mark Scott Abeln
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to GreenMountainGirl, Feb 25, 2013

GreenMountainGirl wrote:

Your monitor also should have an ICC profile associated with it: this is created by the monitor calibrator and it too is used to translate sRGB to colors that the monitor can display.

I did discover where in my computer to do some calibration for the monitor, but there was no mention of ICC. It did offer AdobeRGB (1998).

AdobeRGB, sRGB, ProPhoto, and Wide Gamut RGB are all standard color spaces which are embedded inside of images, but none of them are actually a color profile which characterizes a physical device such as a camera, monitor, or printer. They are rather color standards.

Actual physical devices need ICC profiles that accurately describe them.

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MrMojo
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to GreenMountainGirl, Feb 25, 2013

GreenMountainGirl wrote: I will have to look into Startpage.com, haven't heard of that one before.

Startpage is an Internet search service that preserves user privacy.

Startpage.com is an Internet search engine that uses Google to obtain its results. But unlike Google it strips your IP address from your searches so Google cannot retain a record of your searches. DuckDuckGo likewise does not retain a record of your Internet searches but it does not use Google.

I've installed Glims in Safari so I can easily use Startpage instead of Google. There is a Firefox add-on too.

Glims  http://www.machangout.com

Startpage for Firefox https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/startpage-https-privacy-search/

Startpage Privacy Info  https://startpage.com/eng/protect-privacy.html

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kgbruce01
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Print on clear paper and backlight it (nt)
In reply to GreenMountainGirl, Feb 25, 2013

GreenMountainGirl wrote:

I know that my monitor is not the best, but my editing is done as soft proofing, so thought that would help. Example, I have a picture of a squirrel. Processed it from a copy of the original (a jpeg) - First in LR, then in PSE. I could see that my results were different, but both looked pretty much OK. When I printed, one was too green, the other was too yellow.

Of course I could tweak the images and keep printing until I got one I like, but that uses a lot of ink and paper. Any suggestions would be much appreciated so (hopefully) I can get it right without printing it over and over. I do have paper printable on two sides, which helps!

Always shoot in RAW now, but this still happens. These images are now in my gallery, if you want to see them. (I don't know how to insert them into this posting.) On the screen they don't look too bad. But printed there is green in the squirrel's tail in one, and in the other one the bird food is pretty yellow and the squirrel has brown/yellow patches on its face and ears.

Thanks for any suggestions!

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scorrpio
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Re: calibrate your images, too
In reply to MarkInSF, Feb 25, 2013

A lot of things can be off.   Monitor calibration. printer, ink, paper used, color space the picture is in and software used for printing.   Even with calibrated monitor, a photo-dedicated Epson printer, genuine ink and 5-star Epson paper, trying to print direct from LightRoom often resulted in horrible, greenish results.   Turned out to be a driver issue, something about 64-bit driver used  by LightRoom getting overriden, etc.    When I open same image in Photoshop CS6 and print from there, the results look perfect.   Even though CS6 supposedly uses same driver.  Go figure.

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