D600 . AF in tungsten light

Started Feb 7, 2013 | Discussions
papparazzi
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D600 . AF in tungsten light
Feb 7, 2013

Hi there, need some input from D600 owners...

Have been using a D600 3 days now an noticed something strange, in *warm/tungsten* light it back

focus! when I micro adjust to -17 it resolves the issue.... is this normal?

This happens with every lens :\

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Nikonfan99
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

I would say you just asked a forbidden question. Let the arguments begin. I own a d600/d7000 used focal software to fine tune my large lens collection. I would say that this is a situation that under lower tungsten light, both my cameras do this a bit. My d90 works under low tungsten more accurately. I had two d90’s and neither did it. Sold one after I got the d600. You are going to get some people telling you that you are wrong and I am wrong. They should be here soon

BTW, all my nikon glass back focused during the test. The nikon 50 1.8g on the d600 did the least backfocus. My tamrons both back focused on both bodies the most.

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AllOtherNamesTaken
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

Both my D600's and my D300 focus bang-on under Tungsten light (or any other kind of light).  Doesn't matter what lens.

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papparazzi
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to Nikonfan99, Feb 7, 2013

Nikonfan99 wrote:

I would say you just asked a forbidden question. Let the arguments begin. I own a d600/d7000 used focal software to fine tune my large lens collection. I would say that this is a situation that under lower tungsten light, both my cameras do this a bit. My d90 works under low tungsten more accurately. I had two d90’s and neither did it. Sold one after I got the d600. You are going to get some people telling you that you are wrong and I am wrong. They should be here soon

BTW, all my nikon glass back focused during the test. The nikon 50 1.8g on the d600 did the least backfocus. My tamrons both back focused on both bodies the most.

Humm..yes I have heard people saying horrible stuff from the D7000, but most seem happy with the D600 so my question...

So you say...You have it, in normal light your's ok?

What is the adjustment you need to dial in to make spot on?

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papparazzi
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to AllOtherNamesTaken, Feb 7, 2013

AllOtherNamesTaken wrote:

Both my D600's and my D300 focus bang-on under Tungsten light (or any other kind of light). Doesn't matter what lens.

That's good news...so what do you think is  happening with this D600? Failure? In normal light it works ok...

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Nikonfan99
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

Yes I am not saying it is a deal breaker but I would say after using focal software, the cameras both still back focused in my living room (tungsten low light) by about 3-6 inches behind most objects at times. Would not do it if I shoot with daylight window or outside. I think the AF system is the same in both cameras. YMMV

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lock
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Minor differences in the angle of the secondary mirror.
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

Although likely there is a front or backfocus in any light, tungsten light may Af errors the most. It has been documented before that adjusmtentof this mirror did help (though I'm not sure if other causes may exist that are repairable).

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surrephoto
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

I think in time this will be the next "D800/D4 Left AF Saga"-type of defective camera saga. Wonder whether this is even a defect to begin with. No concrete evidence that this is beyond an inherent design limitation. Some have suggested a sub-mirror adjustment and I am in the midst of investigating that (nikon tech in my country are denying this possibility, AS ALWAYS!)

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50536972

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surrephoto
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to surrephoto, Feb 7, 2013

Food for thought about the seriousness of this problem;

1. Nikon showrooms are a great place to showcase this issue, just try it with a wide-angle lens on one of those big bright yellow nikon murals lighted by tungsten lamps.

2. It's not just the color temperature, any object that is significantly saturated red/orange will result in back-focus. I stay in Chinatown in Singapore, btw, and that 1 street photography session 2 days back was a good test.

3. If you're a wedding photographer who shoot in dim tungsten or 2800k lamps, your life is going to be difficult with the D600.

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papparazzi
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some samples...
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

in tungsten..

Last image corrected with -17 with micro adjustment.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8225/8454735966_175fa1fe10_o.jpg

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surrephoto
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Re: some samples...
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

What is the micro-adjustment value you prefer to use in broad-daylight?

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papparazzi
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to surrephoto, Feb 7, 2013

surrephoto wrote:

Food for thought about the seriousness of this problem;

1. Nikon showrooms are a great place to showcase this issue, just try it with a wide-angle lens on one of those big bright yellow nikon murals lighted by tungsten lamps.

2. It's not just the color temperature, any object that is significantly saturated red/orange will result in back-focus. I stay in Chinatown in Singapore, btw, and that 1 street photography session 2 days back was a good test.

3. If you're a wedding photographer who shoot in dim tungsten or 2800k lamps, your life is going to be difficult with the D600.

That is very upsetting indeed...I wonder how many have this...

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papparazzi
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Re: some samples...
In reply to surrephoto, Feb 7, 2013

surrephoto wrote:

What is the micro-adjustment value you prefer to use in broad-daylight?

With the 35 1.8G -2

and with the 50 1.8 D (zero).

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papparazzi
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Sample in normal daylight
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013
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surrephoto
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Re: some samples...
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

papparazzi wrote:

surrephoto wrote:

What is the micro-adjustment value you prefer to use in broad-daylight?

With the 35 1.8G -2

and with the 50 1.8 D (zero).

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Sounds quite serious to have a value difference of 15. I'm pretty sure that the warmness of the light also affect the severity of the problem so all is not abnormal. Anything below 2800k should result it horrendous back-focus, the problem will also accentuate as the focus distance increases.

As of now the best we can do is to take sample images and seek address at the service centre. In singapore the technician has agreed to do an in-depth test with my D600 (a rather new serial, 3 weeks old) after next week. He has also agreed to test it under 3200k tungsten light.

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Steve Bingham
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Opinions or valuable information?
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

In tungsten the following lens seem to focus perfectly on my D600:

Nikon 24mm f1.4

Sigma 35mm f1.4

Nikon 70-200 f4

Imagine that! When I had the D7000 I read about people screaming about focus problems. I had none, as well as my many pro friends. Where the problems there for some? Sure. But I bet they were a small minority.

In general, forums such as this one are a terrible place to gather real information.

Let me offer some solid advice. ALWAYS check the source and qualifications of the person giving the information. If that is not possible than ignore the advice as worthless.

Everybody has an opinion!!!!!

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AllOtherNamesTaken
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Re: Opinions or valuable information?
In reply to Steve Bingham, Feb 7, 2013

Steve Bingham wrote:

In tungsten the following lens seem to focus perfectly on my D600:

Nikon 24mm f1.4

Sigma 35mm f1.4

Nikon 70-200 f4

Imagine that! When I had the D7000 I read about people screaming about focus problems. I had none, as well as my many pro friends. Where the problems there for some? Sure. But I bet they were a small minority.

In general, forums such as this one are a terrible place to gather real information.

Let me offer some solid advice. ALWAYS check the source and qualifications of the person giving the information. If that is not possible than ignore the advice as worthless.

Everybody has an opinion!!!!!

I've been telling people this for as long as I can remember. Unfortunately it usually falls on deaf ears. The conclusions some people come to on here (Not referring to the OP, just in general) are laughable.

I am also someone with many Nikon bodies, all functioning flawlessly with all lenses (which also function flawlessly). Never had a single warranty issue in 10 years. None of my friends, family members, colleagues, or shooting partners (all Nikon) have had a single issue either. Some people just find it impossible to believe that there is a lot of perfectly functioning gear out there. To be honest though, I think half the time it's the user, not the camera, that needs fixing.

Simple human nature makes forums a TERRIBLE source of reliable statistical information.  People post when they have a problem, never to say they are happy - that's how it works for just about everything.  Also, as you say, nobody knows the credentials of the poster in most cases.  Many of the D7000 "issues" turned out to be user error, but if you didn't read the threads and just scanned the thread titles, you'd think the D7000 was a lemon.

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AllOtherNamesTaken
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Re: D600 . AF in tungsten light
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 7, 2013

papparazzi wrote:

AllOtherNamesTaken wrote:

Both my D600's and my D300 focus bang-on under Tungsten light (or any other kind of light). Doesn't matter what lens.

That's good news...so what do you think is happening with this D600? Failure? In normal light it works ok...

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Honestly I have no idea why your camera would operate any differently, but mine will focus in any kind of lighting, including the worst light imaginable (Nocturnal exhibits at Zoo's, for example).  My keeper rate is higher than it's ever been.

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amobi
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Re: Opinions or valuable information?
In reply to AllOtherNamesTaken, Feb 7, 2013

AllOtherNamesTaken wrote:

Steve Bingham wrote:

In tungsten the following lens seem to focus perfectly on my D600:

Nikon 24mm f1.4

Sigma 35mm f1.4

Nikon 70-200 f4

Imagine that! When I had the D7000 I read about people screaming about focus problems. I had none, as well as my many pro friends. Where the problems there for some? Sure. But I bet they were a small minority.

In general, forums such as this one are a terrible place to gather real information.

Let me offer some solid advice. ALWAYS check the source and qualifications of the person giving the information. If that is not possible than ignore the advice as worthless.

Everybody has an opinion!!!!!

I've been telling people this for as long as I can remember. Unfortunately it usually falls on deaf ears. The conclusions some people come to on here (Not referring to the OP, just in general) are laughable.

I am also someone with many Nikon bodies, all functioning flawlessly with all lenses (which also function flawlessly). Never had a single warranty issue in 10 years. None of my friends, family members, colleagues, or shooting partners (all Nikon) have had a single issue either. Some people just find it impossible to believe that there is a lot of perfectly functioning gear out there. To be honest though, I think half the time it's the user, not the camera, that needs fixing.

Simple human nature makes forums a TERRIBLE source of reliable statistical information. People post when they have a problem, never to say they are happy - that's how it works for just about everything. Also, as you say, nobody knows the credentials of the poster in most cases. Many of the D7000 "issues" turned out to be user error, but if you didn't read the threads and just scanned the thread titles, you'd think the D7000 was a lemon.

Man you are one lucky individual. Everything you touch, turn into gold.  Everything you own function flawlessly. Nikon should shut down their customer service department. I'm sure your D600 has no oil spots on the sensor.

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Fayard
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Re: some samples...
In reply to papparazzi, Feb 8, 2013

I had the "left AF sensor" problem with my D800 and sent my camera for adjustement. It came back to me with autorocus problems which where not present before. The biggest of them is a strong front focus with some warm lights that I have in my house. These problems where not there before.

Therefore, I am getting convinced that focus issues depending on the color temperature might happen because of an adjustment problem in the camera. The only way to really know would be to check another D600 with the same light conditions and the same lens.

Unfortunately, you will have to figure out yourself as everybody has a body with different adjustements.

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