Future of Four-Thirds

Started Jan 21, 2013 | Questions
jkrumm
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Re: The future is MICRO-Four-Thirds
In reply to Everdog, Jan 23, 2013

CDAF is only more accurate under the right conditions. I was walking with my wife in the woods the other day, shooting with the EM5 and 45 1.8. Around 1/2 of the medium distance shots I took of my wife were focused on the trees behind her, something that would not have happened with my E5 and 12-60. CDAF has a ways to go before it competes with pdaf taking images with movement, pinpoint accuracy, and complex backgrounds.

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John Krumm
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dave gaines
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New adapter or new OM-D?
In reply to OM User, Jan 23, 2013

I've held the OM 350 mm f/2.8 mounted on a Nikon D3. The lens mount was changed by SK Grimes of Rhode Island. I held the rig by the lens and it had a lens collar on it. I wouldn't want a smaller camera for that lens. We were out shooting helicopters and I had more reach with the 50-200 on the E-3.

Yes, the BLM-5 is a good size and power level. Two of them in a grip is even better.

For all of the access buttons and large dials you need a larger body. That great 3" screen on the E-5 barely fits. They moved the buttons around from where they were on the E-3 to make the larger screen fit. For my big hands and long fingers I prefer a larger camera body too. I just don't see going smaller to an E-xxx or E-30 size. But anything new in a DSLR would be welcome news for a lot of impatient Olympus affecionados.

I don't see a more expensive adapter as an option for the EM-5. It's already priced at $1460 for the body, grip and MMF adapter. A better adapter, especially one that incorporates a mirror and/or PDAF sensor, would cost over $650. That prices any Pen or OM-D out of the market for a MILC and costs more than a lot of DSLRs.

A screw-on, semi-perminent adapter mount requires a new body. A dual flange mount, with concentric flanges, or one largr flange with the same lens/body connection points could be stronger. But that requires a new body.

I don't see an upgrade to the EM-5 or the EPL-5 by the end of this year. Sales of the OM-D are good. Why kill that cash cow with a better upgrade? Maybe in two to three years, but not now.

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eaa
eaa
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AF frame config
In reply to jkrumm, Jan 24, 2013

jkrumm wrote:

CDAF has a ways to go before it competes with pdaf taking images with movement, pinpoint accuracy, and complex backgrounds.

The AF frame matrix and their sizes/sensitivity must be better defined than in the E-M5. IOW, cross-sensitive frames widely distributed across the VF (not just a centered cluster ála Nikon), and configurable to small(er) sensitivity, for pinpoint aiming and precision.

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ctlow
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Re: Future of Four-Thirds, tea leaves and lottery numbers
In reply to erichK, Jan 28, 2013

erichK wrote:

ctlow wrote:

So, I think I'll go ahead with that Panasonic 25mm f1.4 lens if I can find one.

It is a great lens, and if you manage to snag one, then make sure that you get the Panasonic firmware update to improve LV performance. With that, it works quite well on my OM-D, too.

Thank you, erichK, and to the many others continuing to chime in. Very informative.

I did manage to "snag" one, and like it. Big and heavy but I'm strong. Very fast, a bit noticeably soft wide-open, as I already had read in various reviews.

This is f2.0, 1/60 hand-held, ISO 100 (not an immortal image, but illustrative that the lens does work):

I will check on the firmware update. Good reminder. Thank you.

Charles

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SirSeth
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Re: Future of Four-Thirds, tea leaves and lottery numbers
In reply to ctlow, Jan 29, 2013

ctlow wrote:

dave gaines wrote:

Did you copy something from this article? I only see your personal experiences here.

Sorry, I meant I copied it from my comments on a News article - didn't realize at first that I wasn't in a forum.

Anyway, thank for all of that, and to the many others with excellent observations and analysis. (Historicity Lawrence, for example.) I'm quite surprised at how busy this place is ... having visited dpreview.com for many years but "joining" just yesterday. What a lot of replies in a very short time!

I'm having difficulty finding out what kinds of sensors are in which cameras. I have found that the E-620 has a Panasonic Live MOS sensor. Is that good? What would be better? (Why?) Where would I find that? Apparently, all of the FT E-Series cameras use Panasonic sensors.

Is the small size of the Olympus E-Series sensor really not a limitation, compared with larger sensors with Nikon, Canon, etc.? Isn't there a correlation between sensor-size and low-light performance?

Compared with much larger sensors yes, but not slightly larger. People talk about APS-C as if it's a standard size but in actuality they very. Some sensors considered APS-C are closer to 4/3rds in size than other APS-C sensors. (Like Sigma APS-C). The size difference between 4/3rds and APS-C is often more in peoples heads who want to feel superior about their Rebel or what have you. But I understand this perception because Olympus bought noisy sensors from Panasonic for years. The OM-D is as good at high ISO as the best APS-C sensors, which to some is a miracle but it's more that they bought from Sony a much less noisy sensor. Of course when you start comparing to 35mm, we are talking a huge leap in area and there is a limitation (though not as much as you might think unless you really want to push RAW files in extreme situations). Basically, there is a correlation, but it's not linear. You have to increase the area very significantly to get small gains and there just isn't much in the size difference between APS-C and 4/3rds.

Cheers,

Seth

So, I think I'll go ahead with that Panasonic 25mm f1.4 lens if I can find one.

Thanks very much again.

Charles

P.S. Any idea how many E-Series cameras Olympus has made? It's not always even mentioned after Nikon and Canon, Pentax and several other "newer" camera-manufacturers.

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SirSeth
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Re: The future is MICRO-Four-Thirds
In reply to Everdog, Jan 29, 2013

Everdog wrote:

Micro 4/3rds will soon better support the 4/3rds PDAF lenses. Because CDAF is more accurate (LensRentals already proved this - see DPR article), combined with PDAF, the micro 4/3rds cameras will have superior focusing. They will also have more options in size, better sensors, better IBIS, more compatibility (virtually any lens works on M43), and so much more.

Keep your 4/3rds lenses, enjoy the E-620, and eventually make the switch when you are ready.

I agree with Everdog, but mostly because I'm an eternal optimist and don't really have the money dedicated to upgrading right now anyhow. If I did, I'd have a K30 or E-M5 already.

As it is, I'm holding out with my 11-22mm, 14-54mm, and 50-200mm and hoping that Olympus releases a cracking PDAF/CDAF proMD. Then it's a 2 year wait until I can afford one on the used market.

Cheers,

Seth

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djc1026
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Re: Future of Four-Thirds
In reply to ctlow, Jan 29, 2013

I don't know what the future holds, but just as an amateur who enjoys photography, I love Olympus gear.  Not being one for the latest greatest equipment, I'm very happy with my E-510 and just picked up an E-3 (with extras but no lens) for under $300.  Now I'm looking for a very good deal on 12-60

I guess this puts me in the cult following category

Dave

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ctlow
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Re: Future of Four-Thirds, tea leaves and lottery numbers
In reply to SirSeth, Jan 29, 2013

SirSeth wrote:

Compared with much larger sensors yes, but not slightly larger. People talk about APS-C as if it's a standard size but in actuality they very. Some sensors considered APS-C are closer to 4/3rds in size than other APS-C sensors. (Like Sigma APS-C). The size difference between 4/3rds and APS-C is often more in peoples heads who want to feel superior about their Rebel or what have you. But I understand this perception because Olympus bought noisy sensors from Panasonic for years. The OM-D is as good at high ISO as the best APS-C sensors, which to some is a miracle but it's more that they bought from Sony a much less noisy sensor. Of course when you start comparing to 35mm, we are talking a huge leap in area and there is a limitation (though not as much as you might think unless you really want to push RAW files in extreme situations). Basically, there is a correlation, but it's not linear. You have to increase the area very significantly to get small gains and there just isn't much in the size difference between APS-C and 4/3rds.

Cheers,

Seth

Thanks, Seth. Very helpful.

I've looked around the Net a bit and am having trouble coming up with references for the above.

Where did you learn that information?

The bit about sensor size I'm sure is verifiable from "technical information" available for various cameras. But what about sensor quality? I would like to read more about that.

Charles

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