NEC monitors

Started Jan 19, 2013 | Discussions
Zee Char
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NEC monitors
Jan 19, 2013

I know this may not be the correct forum for this but after days of internet and searches here I have come across monitor threads on the camera forums so here it goes.

I have a 6 year old NEC Multisync 2490WUXi. It has 40,000 hrs on it. NEC told me 50,000 is about the life cycle. They can last much longer but 50,000 is the cutoff point.

I have been using Spyder 3 pro and upgraded to Elite. Had elite for about 3 years. I have always noticed a blue tint or a better word might be the whites look almost too cool. When I reset the monitor to factory the whites are very yellow.

Now I'm comparing this to a new iMac. It is not the screen I want to edit from but when I dragged an image over the whites looked white. Very yellow on the factory preset NEC.

I contacted DataColor and they were very patient and they told me I was doing everything correctly but I just kept getting this blue cast so I was not really getting anywhere. The brightness test showed I'm getting 226 cd/m2 at 100%

Next I downloaded Coloreyes Display Pro trial as you can use it with the Spyder Puck. After calibrating it looked similar to the NEC native or factory reset. So I'm getting two extremes, too cool using Datacolor and too warm using ColorEyes. Could not figure this one out. Trial is over for the coloreyes so that is done.

At this point I'm thinking I need to replace the monitor which I have no problem doing if I need to. I also decided I may as well go with NEC calibration so I ordered the Spectraview II from B&H which I received yesterday. I calibrated my current monitor with great anticipation and I got the cool blue tint again.

I spent some time with NEC support. We tried the brightness test and also got 226 at 100%. The tech guy was getting 300 at 100% so basically it is pointing to a tired monitor but he did not really want to suggest that.

Just to point out out all the settings were 2.2, 120 and 6500 for all calibrators. Spyder always took the white point down to 5800 when I included the ambient reading.

So using NEC I tried intensities of 140 and 160 and @160 it started getting acceptable. I dragged an image over to the iMAC and turned the brightness down and they are pretty close now. NEC a little greyer but that is because of the anti glare.

So I sprung $1000 on a new monitor from B&H yesterday. PA241W-BK. I'm still on the fence because I recall that I always had this blue tint. A friend came over a few years ago and asked why the screen looked blue. Internet searches have shown others seeing this but no real resolution.

The images in PS and LR seem to look OK but internet pages have this blue cast so I'm wondering if it is there in PS and LR and I can't see it. Colour to the human eye is subjective so we rely on calibration. I have been looking at this screen for too long as well I thnk. My concern is I get this new monitor and the same thing happens. I hate returning stuff. I'm hoping this is just due to the monitors age as a person cannot tell over a long slow deterioration.

I'm also wondering about Mountain Lion 10.8.2. I loved my MAC's until this version which I find pretty unstable. I am going to us the new DVI cable and buy a new thunderbolt adapter just to rule anything out if I get the new monitor.

So any other advice, experiences, pointers would be very helpful as I'm on the verge of cancelling the order, returning NEC calibration stuff and looking at other monitor options. The only reason is I have read about this blue tint on the net.

Thanks in advance.

Robert Schoner
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 19, 2013

Hi,

You might try posting on the printer forum. Lots of discussion there on color management etc.

I suspect the "too cool-blue", "too warm-yellow" is comong from where you are setting the white point: 6500K(cool-blue), 5800K(warm-yellow). The Spyder is measuring your ambient light and trying to get the monitor to give something comparable to the surroundings. Incandescent lights are "warm", flourescents are "cool". What the Spyder is trying to do is to calibrate your monitor so the monitor matches printed images which will look different depending on what kind of light they are viewed in.

Try having the Spyder calibrate to different white points (if possible) and see which one you like. It may take some time for your eye/brain to adjust to new settings.

Hth,

Bob Schoner

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Sailor Blue
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 20, 2013

Since you have the Spyder3Elite you should be using the Advanced calibration mode.  In this mode you are given on-screen guidance to help you manually adjust the control on the monitor in order to get the right values for brightness, contrast, and the individual R, G, and B values before the software takes over.  Doing this manual adjustment of the monitor will give you the best calibration.

Start the Spyder3Elite software.  Use the Go/Preferences command and click on Advanced Settings.  In the User Interface box select Advanced then check the box next to Show RGB Sliders as an option in the Identify Color Controls screen before clicking OK.  Click  OK in the Preferences pop-up box.

Now when you do your calibration you will see a graph showing your current setting for brightness, contrast, or R, G, B and the suggested range.  Manually adjust the monitor controls until the values fall within the suggested range before letting the software finish the calibration.  You can get the screen to renew by clicking on the command at the bottom of the instructions box.

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ronzie
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 20, 2013

I think this review will help you find the problem:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/nec_2490wwuxi.htm#spectraview

Out of the box the illumination was measured at 380 ft/cd/m2 or nits. It was way too bright and blue difference from the sRGB color space standard was way too high out of permissible spec. Taken down to 140 nits it was well within tolerance.

You also need to decide on what you are going to use for calibration software. The Spectraview products communicate with the controls anf color look up table. You first set the video card for its standard defaults. Set the monitor for user RGB default reset. Any auto contrast, etc., should be disabled. Then you run the SV software choosing your illumination (best around 120 if you are going to print) and reference color temperature. D65 is common. You make sure ambient light minimally falls on the screen. (On my NEC P221W I have that compensation for brightness disabled.) Then the software will set brightness (of the backlight), and then the LUT's (color look up table in the monitor itself) and create a color profile for your operating system to use as well. The software if you wish can load the monitor LUTs and settings every time you start up your PC.

With 40,000 hours on the monitor you might be getting the aging CCFL backlights to dimming color temperature shifting point easily over driven at too high brightness. You also have to watch out that you are not having the video driver color settings fighting the monitor settings and backlight aging so that the color channels in each are not being over driven. The fact that your color shifts as illumination is reduced indicates one or both of these is taking place.

The Spyder series just adjusts the video card, thus the monitor needs to be manually set up correctly first.

Finally the review shows the monitor should fit very nicely the sRGB color space.

I suggest you look at the color management topics in the printer forum.

I can't find the monitor on the NEC site but from that review it looks like it is not a wide gamut monitor but standard intended for sRGB color space.

As I recall from the Spectraview II FAQ NEC does not recommend using the Spyder measuring devices with their Spectraview software having found to many discrepancies if that was your plan.

The review article uses different calibration software that does communicate with the monitor LUT as well as Spectraview.

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Zee Char
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to ronzie, Jan 20, 2013

ronzie wrote:

I think this review will help you find the problem:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/nec_2490wwuxi.htm#spectraview

Out of the box the illumination was measured at 380 ft/cd/m2 or nits. It was way too bright and blue difference from the sRGB color space standard was way too high out of permissible spec. Taken down to 140 nits it was well within tolerance.

You also need to decide on what you are going to use for calibration software. The Spectraview products communicate with the controls anf color look up table. You first set the video card for its standard defaults. Set the monitor for user RGB default reset. Any auto contrast, etc., should be disabled. Then you run the SV software choosing your illumination (best around 120 if you are going to print) and reference color temperature. D65 is common. You make sure ambient light minimally falls on the screen. (On my NEC P221W I have that compensation for brightness disabled.) Then the software will set brightness (of the backlight), and then the LUT's (color look up table in the monitor itself) and create a color profile for your operating system to use as well. The software if you wish can load the monitor LUTs and settings every time you start up your PC.

With 40,000 hours on the monitor you might be getting the aging CCFL backlights to dimming color temperature shifting point easily over driven at too high brightness. You also have to watch out that you are not having the video driver color settings fighting the monitor settings and backlight aging so that the color channels in each are not being over driven. The fact that your color shifts as illumination is reduced indicates one or both of these is taking place.

I think aging is not helping here. I have read that there is a video LUT and a monitor LUT. I'm
not sure how to prevent or where to look if the monitor and video are fighting each other. I thought this may be an issue before you mentioned it from all the reading I have been doing.

The Spyder series just adjusts the video card, thus the monitor needs to be manually set up correctly first.

This is something I was not aware of. I just set the monitor to factory before calibrating.

Finally the review shows the monitor should fit very nicely the sRGB color space.

I suggest you look at the color management topics in the printer forum.

I can't find the monitor on the NEC site but from that review it looks like it is not a wide gamut monitor but standard intended for sRGB color space.

As I recall from the Spectraview II FAQ NEC does not recommend using the Spyder measuring devices with their Spectraview software having found to many discrepancies if that was your plan.

I'm going to use Spectraview II from now on as it sets the monitor as well.

The review article uses different calibration software that does communicate with the monitor LUT as well as Spectraview.

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Ron Ginsberg
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Zee Char
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Sailor Blue, Jan 20, 2013

Sailor Blue wrote:

Since you have the Spyder3Elite you should be using the Advanced calibration mode. In this mode you are given on-screen guidance to help you manually adjust the control on the monitor in order to get the right values for brightness, contrast, and the individual R, G, and B values before the software takes over. Doing this manual adjustment of the monitor will give you the best calibration.

Start the Spyder3Elite software. Use the Go/Preferences command and click on Advanced Settings. In the User Interface box select Advanced then check the box next to Show RGB Sliders as an option in the Identify Color Controls screen before clicking OK. Click OK in the Preferences pop-up box.

Now when you do your calibration you will see a graph showing your current setting for brightness, contrast, or R, G, B and the suggested range. Manually adjust the monitor controls until the values fall within the suggested range before letting the software finish the calibration. You can get the screen to renew by clicking on the command at the bottom of the instructions box.

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There are a few things I was not doing here with my Spyder. I'm surprised several people here offered more information than the support person did at Datacolor.

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Zee Char
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 20, 2013

Thanks for your help everyone. I posted this on another forum (POTN) and between the both got some very helpful info.

I have to have really push the intensity which is showing my unit is aging. I think I'll get a new one and use Spectraview II from day one.

I must have been doing something right as clients ( the few I have) were happy with the results and when I did do some tests at a local print service they looked good.

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Zee Char
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Re: An update
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 20, 2013

When I woke up this morning and headed to the system the iMac screen was asleep and the NEC was screen saver as usual.

I woke the iMac and the NEC looked excellent. The whites were perfect IMO. Best I have seen so far. Sat down with my wife had some coffee and chatted. Came back to the some scenario, woke up the iMac and now the whites have that cool/blue look again.

Before using Spectraview I went into the libraries and deleted all the previous profiles I created using Spyder.

A screen shot of displays and colorsync utility. They look normal. The LCD2490WUXi- 000038A3 (and so on) is the original NEC profile and the one LCD2490WUXi 7Z103071is the one Spectraview created is selected.

Image #1

This is a screen shot of the colorsync utility in the bottom tray when I click on it. The red dots represent all the profiles I deleted. I cannot find them in the 3 libraries I have looked in yet they show up here. Even apple support could not figure this one out.

NEC LCD2490WUX-1 and NEC2490WUX-2 were named by Spyder and new/new test I named.

Image #2

One last thing. My Mac was wonderful until Mountain Lion 10.8.2. I'm finding it very unstable with other things than this as well. When I wake up them monitor the screens flash back and forth until they settle. On occasion about (1 time out of 20) the displays reverse on their own.

This is what I have it set at.

Image #3

This is what I get from time to time. I wonder if it is picking a different profile when I wake it up. One the colorsync displays in image #2 that I can't find anywhere. I am using a DVI cable with a thunderbolt adapter for the iMac output.

Image #4

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Zee Char
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Re: An update
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 20, 2013

Oh yes. I have read you can clean or scrub the LUT. Not sure if it is on the monitor/video only or both. I tried to find software but could not.

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ronzie
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Re: An update
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 21, 2013

Are you aware that it takes a long time for the CCFL backlights to stabilize? If you allow your monitor to sleep it will drift over at least a thirty minute period after the video port is activated. Allowing the sleep mode to shut down the backlight is a no go.

If you calibrate before the backlight has stabilized then your calibration curve is off.

I have regular soft white florescent lighting in a cool laundry room. If I go back later leaving them on I notice the brightness increase and it seems the light is cooler in temperature.

In several CFL fixtures they start off as a "pink" dim light and get brighter drifting to cooler color.

On my NEC monitor (the desktop is spread across two monitors) when I power it up and enable the dual view video card function, I can see the desktop background (tiled red bricks) get brighter as I frequently look over two it. I allow at least thirty minutes before using it and to be sure one hour before calibrating it.

The backlight is off in NEC monitors until the video card port is activated (on mine the indicator goes from yellow-standby to blue-getting video.

Disable the sleep settings in your pc operating system and just keep the NEC powered down until the stabilization period needed before you start using it. (I am not talking about the NEC master power "vacation" switch.) My monitors and pcs are on a standby (UPS) conditioning power unit and I turn off that master when not using anything.

FWIW I also have the Econo-mode set on the NEC at 75% limit for the backlight range although at 110 nits I am only running about 36% of the rated brightness of 300 nits.

Unlike CRT units the brightness control only affects the backlight. The rest affect the LCD panel pixel transparency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TFT_LCD might herlp you to understand how these LCD panels word. Note the section on panel types. My NEC P221W is an S-PVA and Spectraview measures it at 98% Adobe 1998 RGB. This NEC is wide gamut. My day to day monitor is an sRGB S_IPS from Viewsonic and measures at 96% sRGB coverage (VP2365-LED) as profiled\measured by a Color Munki Photo. The LED backlight quickly stabilizes.

There do not appear to be many wide gamut monitors using LED backlighting so if you want Adobe 1998 RGB you may have to stick with CCFL backlighting.

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Ron Ginsberg
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Zee Char
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Re: An update
In reply to ronzie, Jan 21, 2013

Yes I know you need to wait 1/2 hr before calibrating. The iMac goes to sleep but the NEC runs with a screen saver because I also run a PC on it. When the Mac sleeps the PC does the screen saver.

As I said when I woke up the MAC thing morning it looked great. Let it go to sleep and woke it up again a few hrs later it had that blue tint.

I spent about an hour with Apple support. I found out that the profiles I deleted are actually not there. Made sense as I could not open them but wanted to be sure some old profile was not being picked up. We basically deleted a bunch of playlists. Things are looking much better now although I still think the monitor is getting a little old. It cannot hit 300 cd/m2 any longer, only about 226.

I think getting better results had a lot to do with the Spectraview II. I'm pretty impressed with it. Easy to use, great tests and reports. Doing better than Spyder did but then again I did not preset the monitor. I prefer Spectaview to do it all.

Ones dotted red are ones actually deleted but still show up as ones I previously opened. Now I know they are not being picked up.

I have until the morning to decide. I have gone into my account at B&H 3 times today and almost cancelled the order because now I'm wondering if it is worth it. My current one is pretty old and I have a little extra cash coming in. I know I will be able to get the new one right so that is not a concern any longer. I'll see in the morning.

Thanks for the help.

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ronzie
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Re: An update
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 21, 2013

If the monitor is in dim ambient light for editing you only need 110 to 130 nits. If you were constantly running at 300 it could be at end of usable life if you try to maintain that.

Most of the Pro line NEC monitors are still CCFL, not LED, backlight including the sRGB gamut ones. I am looking at the P241W  which is quite expensive without Spectraview on the NEC site at USD$749. There is a discrepancy on the NEC site that states the P241W is sRGB but the listing for the same model with Spectraview II is Adobe RGB at 96%. The description for both is color critical but I think you should get clarification.

I am looking at Provantage for example and they offer it at about USD$890 with Spectraview and 576 without.

Amazon has the models listed duplicated lowest price at $635 without SV and $1163 with SVII.

Be aware that these might have the old NEC customized I1D2 sensor instead of the newer I1 Display unit which may be on newer models. They still are CCFL backlights.

If you only need sRGB gamut just for web use than look at an LED sRGB rated model. My Viewsonic 2365 LED I purchased at $299 from Amazon. There is a bit of blue backlight leakage on the right side but well out of an editor's canvas area. It is 96% sRGB.

Now some printers on some colors can exceed the sRGB gamut limits and if you wish to print these than you will need an Adobe 1998 RGB wider gamut monitor.

Again, look in the printer forum for the topic of sRGB or Adobe RGB gamut and printing range. This has to do with soft proofing.

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Ron Ginsberg
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Zee Char
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Re: An update
In reply to ronzie, Jan 21, 2013

ronzie wrote:

If the monitor is in dim ambient light for editing you only need 110 to 130 nits. If you were constantly running at 300 it could be at end of usable life if you try to maintain that.

I never ran it that bright. I would have burned out my pupils I just can't get it that bright any longer. I can only get to 226 and NEC support told me that was acceptable.

Most of the Pro line NEC monitors are still CCFL, not LED, backlight including the sRGB gamut ones. I am looking at the P241W which is quite expensive without Spectraview on the NEC site at USD$749. There is a discrepancy on the NEC site that states the P241W is sRGB but the listing for the same model with Spectraview II is Adobe RGB at 96%. The description for both is color critical but I think you should get clarification.

I am looking at Provantage for example and they offer it at about USD$890 with Spectraview and 576 without.

Amazon has the models listed duplicated lowest price at $635 without SV and $1163 with SVII.

Be aware that these might have the old NEC customized I1D2 sensor instead of the newer I1 Display unit which may be on newer models. They still are CCFL backlights.

If you only need sRGB gamut just for web use than look at an LED sRGB rated model. My Viewsonic 2365 LED I purchased at $299 from Amazon. There is a bit of blue backlight leakage on the right side but well out of an editor's canvas area. It is 96% sRGB.

Now some printers on some colors can exceed the sRGB gamut limits and if you wish to print these than you will need an Adobe 1998 RGB wider gamut monitor.

Again, look in the printer forum for the topic of sRGB or Adobe RGB gamut and printing range. This has to do with soft proofing.

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Ron Ginsberg
Minneapolis, MN
Land of 10,000 Puddles

I cancelled the order because my monitor looks very good right now. Excellent actually. Gonna set up a fund and replace it in the next year. NEC 50,000 hrs is about the life expectancy and I'm at 40, 457. So far I have nothing but good things to say about Spectraview, NEC support and B&H. No hassle cancellations or returns at B&H.

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ronzie
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Re: An update
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 21, 2013

A quick explanation of what I meant by conflicting LUTs. If in the process say a video card is set to produce a higher video output on a certain channel because a monitor is suppressing that video in its circuitry that card channel output could be overloading the monitor channel. That is why it is important to set up the card to an initial default standard if you are going to make monitor adjustments via its LUTs.

I am a retired TV Broadcast Tech and occasionally I would see a higher video channel output cranked up because a monitor or other device channel gain was set too low and at the destination device input stage it was driven to a non-linear overload situation. This applies to digital as well.

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Ron Ginsberg
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Zee Char
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Re: An update
In reply to ronzie, Jan 22, 2013

Thanks. I have been searching for that info. That is the closest explanation to what I have trying to figure out.

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summitphotographer
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 22, 2013

I've had good results with Dell UltraSharp IPS models, offer stable colors at reasonable prices, check techbargains.com for sales.

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bronxbombers4
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to Zee Char, Jan 22, 2013

Zee Char wrote:

I know this may not be the correct forum for this but after days of internet and searches here I have come across monitor threads on the camera forums so here it goes.

I have a 6 year old NEC Multisync 2490WUXi. It has 40,000 hrs on it. NEC told me 50,000 is about the life cycle. They can last much longer but 50,000 is the cutoff point.

I have been using Spyder 3 pro and upgraded to Elite. Had elite for about 3 years. I have always noticed a blue tint or a better word might be the whites look almost too cool. When I reset the monitor to factory the whites are very yellow.

Now I'm comparing this to a new iMac. It is not the screen I want to edit from but when I dragged an image over the whites looked white. Very yellow on the factory preset NEC.

I contacted DataColor and they were very patient and they told me I was doing everything correctly but I just kept getting this blue cast so I was not really getting anywhere. The brightness test showed I'm getting 226 cd/m2 at 100%

Next I downloaded Coloreyes Display Pro trial as you can use it with the Spyder Puck. After calibrating it looked similar to the NEC native or factory reset. So I'm getting two extremes, too cool using Datacolor and too warm using ColorEyes. Could not figure this one out. Trial is over for the coloreyes so that is done.

At this point I'm thinking I need to replace the monitor which I have no problem doing if I need to. I also decided I may as well go with NEC calibration so I ordered the Spectraview II from B&H which I received yesterday. I calibrated my current monitor with great anticipation and I got the cool blue tint again.

I spent some time with NEC support. We tried the brightness test and also got 226 at 100%. The tech guy was getting 300 at 100% so basically it is pointing to a tired monitor but he did not really want to suggest that.

Just to point out out all the settings were 2.2, 120 and 6500 for all calibrators. Spyder always took the white point down to 5800 when I included the ambient reading.

So using NEC I tried intensities of 140 and 160 and @160 it started getting acceptable. I dragged an image over to the iMAC and turned the brightness down and they are pretty close now. NEC a little greyer but that is because of the anti glare.

So I sprung $1000 on a new monitor from B&H yesterday. PA241W-BK. I'm still on the fence because I recall that I always had this blue tint. A friend came over a few years ago and asked why the screen looked blue. Internet searches have shown others seeing this but no real resolution.

The images in PS and LR seem to look OK but internet pages have this blue cast so I'm wondering if it is there in PS and LR and I can't see it. Colour to the human eye is subjective so we rely on calibration. I have been looking at this screen for too long as well I thnk. My concern is I get this new monitor and the same thing happens. I hate returning stuff. I'm hoping this is just due to the monitors age as a person cannot tell over a long slow deterioration.

I'm also wondering about Mountain Lion 10.8.2. I loved my MAC's until this version which I find pretty unstable. I am going to us the new DVI cable and buy a new thunderbolt adapter just to rule anything out if I get the new monitor.

So any other advice, experiences, pointers would be very helpful as I'm on the verge of cancelling the order, returning NEC calibration stuff and looking at other monitor options. The only reason is I have read about this blue tint on the net.

Thanks in advance.

Like my PA241 a lot. There have been LOTS of monitor threads in the PC Forum section here. I think is where by far the most of them have been.

No blue tints. I used the custom NEC i1D2, an i1 Pro spectro and an i1Display Pro (which is what the current SV II kit should come with).

Did you order just the SV II software and use the same Spyder 3 puck again or did you get the one that comes with the i1Pro Display puck? (for i1D2 is was vastly better to get it from NEC, since those were custom calibrated and off the sheld i1D2 were random junk AND unable to calibrate wide gamut). Currently it is better to get SV II software only and then an xrite i1 Display Pro off the shelf since the one from NEC is locked out of third party software usage I believe and the off the shelf ones for this puck were tuned to the exact NEC PA241W for their wide gamut table and they have very, very low copy to copy variability.

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bronxbombers4
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to bronxbombers4, Jan 22, 2013

If you use an i1 Display Pro make sure to let it warm up for 20 minutes. Open the probe window with SV II and put it to continuous read and just let it read non-stop like that for 20 minutes, also make sure ot have had the monitor contrinuously on for a good 30 minutes.

You may want to turn off metamerism correction if it got toggled on by accident (multiprofiler has the control).

For photo editing you want native gamut as the SV II basis. For TV/DVD you want the Broadcast basis (sRGB gamut plus gamma 2.2). For web-viewing and sRGB images to look perfect in non-color managed software the sRGB basis worsks (sRGB gamut plus sRGB TRC, note that sRGB images DO NOT use gamma 2.2 and if you have the monitor set to gamma 2.2 then images will look different in manged vs non-managed software such as using IE vs Firefox).

The 14bit internal LUT in the PA series is great.

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Zee Char
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to bronxbombers4, Jan 22, 2013

bronxbombers4 wrote:

Zee Char wrote:

I know this may not be the correct forum for this but after days of internet and searches here I have come across monitor threads on the camera forums so here it goes.

I have a 6 year old NEC Multisync 2490WUXi. It has 40,000 hrs on it. NEC told me 50,000 is about the life cycle. They can last much longer but 50,000 is the cutoff point.

I have been using Spyder 3 pro and upgraded to Elite. Had elite for about 3 years. I have always noticed a blue tint or a better word might be the whites look almost too cool. When I reset the monitor to factory the whites are very yellow.

Now I'm comparing this to a new iMac. It is not the screen I want to edit from but when I dragged an image over the whites looked white. Very yellow on the factory preset NEC.

I contacted DataColor and they were very patient and they told me I was doing everything correctly but I just kept getting this blue cast so I was not really getting anywhere. The brightness test showed I'm getting 226 cd/m2 at 100%

Next I downloaded Coloreyes Display Pro trial as you can use it with the Spyder Puck. After calibrating it looked similar to the NEC native or factory reset. So I'm getting two extremes, too cool using Datacolor and too warm using ColorEyes. Could not figure this one out. Trial is over for the coloreyes so that is done.

At this point I'm thinking I need to replace the monitor which I have no problem doing if I need to. I also decided I may as well go with NEC calibration so I ordered the Spectraview II from B&H which I received yesterday. I calibrated my current monitor with great anticipation and I got the cool blue tint again.

I spent some time with NEC support. We tried the brightness test and also got 226 at 100%. The tech guy was getting 300 at 100% so basically it is pointing to a tired monitor but he did not really want to suggest that.

Just to point out out all the settings were 2.2, 120 and 6500 for all calibrators. Spyder always took the white point down to 5800 when I included the ambient reading.

So using NEC I tried intensities of 140 and 160 and @160 it started getting acceptable. I dragged an image over to the iMAC and turned the brightness down and they are pretty close now. NEC a little greyer but that is because of the anti glare.

So I sprung $1000 on a new monitor from B&H yesterday. PA241W-BK. I'm still on the fence because I recall that I always had this blue tint. A friend came over a few years ago and asked why the screen looked blue. Internet searches have shown others seeing this but no real resolution.

The images in PS and LR seem to look OK but internet pages have this blue cast so I'm wondering if it is there in PS and LR and I can't see it. Colour to the human eye is subjective so we rely on calibration. I have been looking at this screen for too long as well I thnk. My concern is I get this new monitor and the same thing happens. I hate returning stuff. I'm hoping this is just due to the monitors age as a person cannot tell over a long slow deterioration.

I'm also wondering about Mountain Lion 10.8.2. I loved my MAC's until this version which I find pretty unstable. I am going to us the new DVI cable and buy a new thunderbolt adapter just to rule anything out if I get the new monitor.

So any other advice, experiences, pointers would be very helpful as I'm on the verge of cancelling the order, returning NEC calibration stuff and looking at other monitor options. The only reason is I have read about this blue tint on the net.

Thanks in advance.

Like my PA241 a lot. There have been LOTS of monitor threads in the PC Forum section here. I think is where by far the most of them have been.

No blue tints. I used the custom NEC i1D2, an i1 Pro spectro and an i1Display Pro (which is what the current SV II kit should come with).

Did you order just the SV II software and use the same Spyder 3 puck again or did you get the one that comes with the i1Pro Display puck? (for i1D2 is was vastly better to get it from NEC, since those were custom calibrated and off the sheld i1D2 were random junk AND unable to calibrate wide gamut). Currently it is better to get SV II software only and then an xrite i1 Display Pro off the shelf since the one from NEC is locked out of third party software usage I believe and the off the shelf ones for this puck were tuned to the exact NEC PA241W for their wide gamut table and they have very, very low copy to copy variability.

I'm not using the Spyder puck. This is what I ordered.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/613707-REG/NEC_SVII_PRO_KIT_Color_Sensor_and_SpectraView.html

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Zee Char
Veteran MemberPosts: 8,230
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Re: NEC monitors
In reply to bronxbombers4, Jan 22, 2013

bronxbombers4 wrote:

If you use an i1 Display Pro make sure to let it warm up for 20 minutes. Open the probe window with SV II and put it to continuous read and just let it read non-stop like that for 20 minutes, also make sure ot have had the monitor contrinuously on for a good 30 minutes.

You may want to turn off metamerism correction if it got toggled on by accident (multiprofiler has the control).

For photo editing you want native gamut as the SV II basis. For TV/DVD you want the Broadcast basis (sRGB gamut plus gamma 2.2). For web-viewing and sRGB images to look perfect in non-color managed software the sRGB basis worsks (sRGB gamut plus sRGB TRC, note that sRGB images DO NOT use gamma 2.2 and if you have the monitor set to gamma 2.2 then images will look different in manged vs non-managed software such as using IE vs Firefox).

The 14bit internal LUT in the PA series is great.

My monitor is looking excellent right now. When I get home from work tonight I'll give this a good read. I never thought of warming up the sensor.

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