Got my fisheye yesterday!

Started Jan 19, 2013 | Discussions
guidodg
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Re: Got my fisheye yesterday!
In reply to YuriS, Jan 20, 2013

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YuriS
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Re: Got my fisheye yesterday!
In reply to guidodg, Jan 20, 2013

Cool! Very very nice! I see you like it too...
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Francis Carver
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Which particular Rokinon fisheye did you get?
In reply to clengman, Jan 20, 2013

Thank you so much for posting these pix, if I may ask you, which particular Rokinon fisheye optic did you get, the native M4/3 mount 7.5mm, or the 8mm version with a M4/3 lens mount adapter?

I noticed some of your shots were labeled "inverted," I could not see much difference between those and the non-inverted ones, so what does it mean when you say you had "inverted" these shots? Thanks again!

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Anders W
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Re: Which particular Rokinon fisheye did you get?
In reply to Francis Carver, Jan 20, 2013

Francis Carver wrote:

Thank you so much for posting these pix, if I may ask you, which particular Rokinon fisheye optic did you get, the native M4/3 mount 7.5mm, or the 8mm version with a M4/3 lens mount adapter?

It's the native MFT lens that we are talking about.



I noticed some of your shots were labeled "inverted," I could not see much difference between those and the non-inverted ones, so what does it mean when you say you had "inverted" these shots? Thanks again!

See here:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50694364

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Francis Carver
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Which Rokinon lens is it -- 7.5mm or 8mm?
In reply to Pedagydusz, Jan 20, 2013

Pedagydusz wrote:

Apparently, everybody knows which lens the OP (clengman) and fish monkey are using. But I haven't a clue, and would like to know, given the obvious interest of theses photos!

(I know what a "fisheye" is, I am asking making and model )

Could you please clarify?

I think it is a ROKINON 7.5mm M4/3, but it could also be a ROKINON 8mm with a Canon, Nikon, etc. mount and a M4/3rd lens mount adapter. Just asked the same thing from the OP.

http://www.rokinon.com/subcategory.php?subcatId=20

http://www.rokinon.com/subcategory.php?subcatId=1

As you can tell, the 8mm variant can also be ordered as a CINEMA LENS which in this case mostly means that you can manually adjust the iris on it in totally smooth fashion, i.e. the aperture ring had been "de-clicked." Comes into the picture mostly (i.e. makes more sense) for videography apps, of course.

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clengman
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Re: Which particular Rokinon fisheye did you get?
In reply to Francis Carver, Jan 20, 2013

Francis Carver wrote:

Thank you so much for posting these pix, if I may ask you, which particular Rokinon fisheye optic did you get, the native M4/3 mount 7.5mm, or the 8mm version with a M4/3 lens mount adapter?

I noticed some of your shots were labeled "inverted," I could not see much difference between those and the non-inverted ones, so what does it mean when you say you had "inverted" these shots? Thanks again!

My pleasure glad you found them helpful. As Anders wrote, these are from the 7.5mm lens with native m4/3 mount. I see he also pointed to a quick explanation of the inverted vs not inverted business. I just wanted to point out though that I mislabeled the photos. Those taken with the camera in the regular orientation are labeled "inverted" and those taken with the camera upside down are not.

I'm not sure about any of the other versions of this and similar lenses made by Samyang for other mounts, but one really nice thing about the m4/3 version is the size. It has an integrated petal-type hood and with the hood and a lens cap fitted over the end of the hood, it's barely any larger than the collapsible oly kit zooms are when collapsed. It is also rather heavy and feels well-built with a metal mount.

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Geodesiq
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Re: Which particular Rokinon fisheye did you get?
In reply to clengman, Jan 21, 2013

Is it possible to mount a filter? Since it's almost impossible outdoors to exclude sky, it just begs for a polarizer.

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Anders W
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Re: Which particular Rokinon fisheye did you get?
In reply to Geodesiq, Jan 21, 2013

Geodesiq wrote:

Is it possible to mount a filter? Since it's almost impossible outdoors to exclude sky, it just begs for a polarizer.

No, it doesn't take filters. But I don't think you would want to use a polarizer with this lens even if it could take one. The polarizing effects depends on the angle to the sun and would therefore be very uneven across the sky for such a wide FoV (180 degrees diagonally, 132 horizontally). Conventionally, an FL of 28 mm (FF equivalent) is thought of as the limit for the use of a polarizer if you want a reasonably even effect on the sky. Beyond that, it gets tricky even with ordinary WAs, let alone fisheyes.

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micksh6
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to RoelHendrickx, Jan 21, 2013

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

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SW Anderson
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Re: Got my fisheye yesterday!
In reply to clengman, Jan 21, 2013

That second trees photo is strongly reminiscent of Van Gogh. A delightful image and good use of the fisheye lens.

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Francis Carver
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De-fishing techniques for fisheye videos
In reply to micksh6, Jan 21, 2013

micksh6 wrote:

You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

Okay, sounds good. Do you perhaps know of any "de-fisheye" plug-ins or programs for de-fishing videos shot with fisheye optics? Something that perhaps can be used with Lightworks, Sony Vegas and/or Grass Valley Edius NLEs.

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clengman
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to micksh6, Jan 21, 2013

micksh6 wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

So far I've downloaded Kenw's lens profiles for lightroom, and I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Hugin. I know you like the Hemi Defish plugin for PS, but I'm wondering if you're aware of other software packages that can perform these image transforms.

As I was searching around I saw a demo of a perspective/distortion correction tool on youtube. This software included a kind of a "brush tool" to make local adjustments. (e.g. to straighten barrel distortion where it's really obvious like a on a tile floor without affecting the rest of the image) That seemed like it might be useful for some images, but I can't for the life of me relocate that video or the name of the software package used in the video. I'm starting to think I imagined it.

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brentbrent
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to clengman, Jan 21, 2013

I love my Rokinon and use it a lot.  Perhaps someday I'll splurge on the 7-14, but for now the wide angle possibilities of the 7.5 are great.  I sometimes use KenW's lens profiles in LR to defish, but I think I more often use Image Trend's Fisheye-Hemi plugin for Photoshop: http://www.imagetrendsinc.com/products/prodpage_hemi.asp  Right now they have a 40% off sale (use the discount code New40 ) til Feb. 11, so that takes the price down to $18.  It corrects vertical lines that are distorted, but not horizontal ones (at least not much), and it does it without cropping much of the image and without creating a lot of width distortion.

This one I'm pretty sure I corrected with Fisheye-Hemi:



Sunset hot tub

Of course, some images are fine just left all fishy!



Moonbathing

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Anders W
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to clengman, Jan 22, 2013

clengman wrote:

micksh6 wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

So far I've downloaded Kenw's lens profiles for lightroom, and I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Hugin. I know you like the Hemi Defish plugin for PS, but I'm wondering if you're aware of other software packages that can perform these image transforms.

As I was searching around I saw a demo of a perspective/distortion correction tool on youtube. This software included a kind of a "brush tool" to make local adjustments. (e.g. to straighten barrel distortion where it's really obvious like a on a tile floor without affecting the rest of the image) That seemed like it might be useful for some images, but I can't for the life of me relocate that video or the name of the software package used in the video. I'm starting to think I imagined it.

I doubt that it is possible to really make "local adjustments" of distortion. Ends have to meet somewhere in the picture.

What you probably saw was some tool that allows you to reduce distortion of a certain kind and in a certain place where it's really evident at the expense of more distortion of a another kind and/or in another place where it's less evident. Hugin will let you do that with the general Panini projection. There are a lot of parameters to play with to get things just right.

Not that you always have to. The little experiments I have so far performed suggests, as I expected, that regular Panini works surprisingly well for many of those shots where the really wide FoV is desirable but where the fisheye distortion detracts from rather than adds to the composition.

I even think, again as I expected, that I will find it preferable to convert the rectilinear projection produced by my 7-14 to Panini. While the 7-14 works perfectly well at its short end for certain scenes, there are others where the stretching towards the edges looks pretty bad. It's partly a matter of whether there are objects in the scene whose dimensions are known/guessable (e.g., people), partly a matter of how flat the subject is. Shoot a wide, flat building parallel to the sensor and you'll have no trouble. Shoot down a hall and you will/might.

As to software, I downloaded a trial copy of Hemi too. While it's perhaps a tad more expedient than Hugin for converting a single image to standard Panini, Hugin is a) much more flexible, and b) offers a batch facility that you can use for expedient processing of many images in a standardized way. So my bets are on Hugin right now.

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clengman
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to Anders W, Jan 22, 2013

Anders W wrote:

clengman wrote:

micksh6 wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

So far I've downloaded Kenw's lens profiles for lightroom, and I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Hugin. I know you like the Hemi Defish plugin for PS, but I'm wondering if you're aware of other software packages that can perform these image transforms.

As I was searching around I saw a demo of a perspective/distortion correction tool on youtube. This software included a kind of a "brush tool" to make local adjustments. (e.g. to straighten barrel distortion where it's really obvious like a on a tile floor without affecting the rest of the image) That seemed like it might be useful for some images, but I can't for the life of me relocate that video or the name of the software package used in the video. I'm starting to think I imagined it.

I doubt that it is possible to really make "local adjustments" of distortion. Ends have to meet somewhere in the picture.

What you probably saw was some tool that allows you to reduce distortion of a certain kind and in a certain place where it's really evident at the expense of more distortion of a another kind and/or in another place where it's less evident. Hugin will let you do that with the general Panini projection. There are a lot of parameters to play with to get things just right.

Not that you always have to. The little experiments I have so far performed suggests, as I expected, that regular Panini works surprisingly well for many of those shots where the really wide FoV is desirable but where the fisheye distortion detracts from rather than adds to the composition.

I even think, again as I expected, that I will find it preferable to convert the rectilinear projection produced by my 7-14 to Panini. While the 7-14 works perfectly well at its short end for certain scenes, there are others where the stretching towards the edges looks pretty bad. It's partly a matter of whether there are objects in the scene whose dimensions are known/guessable (e.g., people), partly a matter of how flat the subject is. Shoot a wide, flat building parallel to the sensor and you'll have no trouble. Shoot down a hall and you will/might.

As to software, I downloaded a trial copy of Hemi too. While it's perhaps a tad more expedient than Hugin for converting a single image to standard Panini, Hugin is a) much more flexible, and b) offers a batch facility that you can use for expedient processing of many images in a standardized way. So my bets are on Hugin right now.

I know what you mean. Even as I watched the video I was wondering how that trick was accomplished or how well it could possibly work. There wasn't enough detail in a youtube video to check for artifacts.

I can tell you what I saw in the video though. The demonstrator used a photo taken in a small room using a fisheye lens. There was quite a bit of perspective skewing to correct as well as the obvious barrel distortion. He started by straightening and cropping the photo, but I don't think he used a full rectilinear conversion and there was a section of tile floor visible in the center of the photo with some obvious residual barrel distortion. The portion of floor was bounded by walls and people in the room to form a sort of irregular polygon. He used a round selection tool to select this area of the floor then in a few quick keystrokes the barrel distortion was gone from the tile pattern in the floor but the overall shape of the bounded area hadn't changed.

I have continued to search for this demonstration and still haven't been able to find it. I probably dreamed it.

 clengman's gear list:clengman's gear list
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Anders W
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to clengman, Jan 22, 2013

clengman wrote:

Anders W wrote:

clengman wrote:

micksh6 wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

So far I've downloaded Kenw's lens profiles for lightroom, and I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Hugin. I know you like the Hemi Defish plugin for PS, but I'm wondering if you're aware of other software packages that can perform these image transforms.

As I was searching around I saw a demo of a perspective/distortion correction tool on youtube. This software included a kind of a "brush tool" to make local adjustments. (e.g. to straighten barrel distortion where it's really obvious like a on a tile floor without affecting the rest of the image) That seemed like it might be useful for some images, but I can't for the life of me relocate that video or the name of the software package used in the video. I'm starting to think I imagined it.

I doubt that it is possible to really make "local adjustments" of distortion. Ends have to meet somewhere in the picture.

What you probably saw was some tool that allows you to reduce distortion of a certain kind and in a certain place where it's really evident at the expense of more distortion of a another kind and/or in another place where it's less evident. Hugin will let you do that with the general Panini projection. There are a lot of parameters to play with to get things just right.

Not that you always have to. The little experiments I have so far performed suggests, as I expected, that regular Panini works surprisingly well for many of those shots where the really wide FoV is desirable but where the fisheye distortion detracts from rather than adds to the composition.

I even think, again as I expected, that I will find it preferable to convert the rectilinear projection produced by my 7-14 to Panini. While the 7-14 works perfectly well at its short end for certain scenes, there are others where the stretching towards the edges looks pretty bad. It's partly a matter of whether there are objects in the scene whose dimensions are known/guessable (e.g., people), partly a matter of how flat the subject is. Shoot a wide, flat building parallel to the sensor and you'll have no trouble. Shoot down a hall and you will/might.

As to software, I downloaded a trial copy of Hemi too. While it's perhaps a tad more expedient than Hugin for converting a single image to standard Panini, Hugin is a) much more flexible, and b) offers a batch facility that you can use for expedient processing of many images in a standardized way. So my bets are on Hugin right now.

I know what you mean. Even as I watched the video I was wondering how that trick was accomplished or how well it could possibly work. There wasn't enough detail in a youtube video to check for artifacts.

I can tell you what I saw in the video though. The demonstrator used a photo taken in a small room using a fisheye lens. There was quite a bit of perspective skewing to correct as well as the obvious barrel distortion. He started by straightening and cropping the photo, but I don't think he used a full rectilinear conversion and there was a section of tile floor visible in the center of the photo with some obvious residual barrel distortion. The portion of floor was bounded by walls and people in the room to form a sort of irregular polygon. He used a round selection tool to select this area of the floor then in a few quick keystrokes the barrel distortion was gone from the tile pattern in the floor but the overall shape of the bounded area hadn't changed.

I have continued to search for this demonstration and still haven't been able to find it. I probably dreamed it.

Let me know when you find it.

 Anders W's gear list:Anders W's gear list
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clengman
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to Anders W, Jan 22, 2013

Anders W wrote:

clengman wrote:

Anders W wrote:

clengman wrote:

micksh6 wrote:

RoelHendrickx wrote:

This is a message from someone severely addicted to fisheye.

Trust me : you can use that lens creatively on more subjects than you would imagine at first.

Don't hesitate to get really really really close to stuff.


It's addictive, yes. One photographer that I know told me that the biggest danger with fisheye is to start shooting everything with fisheye. I found that it's true. Then I got a second body to mount non-fisheye lenses so I would use them too. You really can shoot anything with fisheye, even portraits, just need to explore various defishing options to make pictures more pleasant for wider audience.

So far I've downloaded Kenw's lens profiles for lightroom, and I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of Hugin. I know you like the Hemi Defish plugin for PS, but I'm wondering if you're aware of other software packages that can perform these image transforms.

As I was searching around I saw a demo of a perspective/distortion correction tool on youtube. This software included a kind of a "brush tool" to make local adjustments. (e.g. to straighten barrel distortion where it's really obvious like a on a tile floor without affecting the rest of the image) That seemed like it might be useful for some images, but I can't for the life of me relocate that video or the name of the software package used in the video. I'm starting to think I imagined it.

I doubt that it is possible to really make "local adjustments" of distortion. Ends have to meet somewhere in the picture.

What you probably saw was some tool that allows you to reduce distortion of a certain kind and in a certain place where it's really evident at the expense of more distortion of a another kind and/or in another place where it's less evident. Hugin will let you do that with the general Panini projection. There are a lot of parameters to play with to get things just right.

Not that you always have to. The little experiments I have so far performed suggests, as I expected, that regular Panini works surprisingly well for many of those shots where the really wide FoV is desirable but where the fisheye distortion detracts from rather than adds to the composition.

I even think, again as I expected, that I will find it preferable to convert the rectilinear projection produced by my 7-14 to Panini. While the 7-14 works perfectly well at its short end for certain scenes, there are others where the stretching towards the edges looks pretty bad. It's partly a matter of whether there are objects in the scene whose dimensions are known/guessable (e.g., people), partly a matter of how flat the subject is. Shoot a wide, flat building parallel to the sensor and you'll have no trouble. Shoot down a hall and you will/might.

As to software, I downloaded a trial copy of Hemi too. While it's perhaps a tad more expedient than Hugin for converting a single image to standard Panini, Hugin is a) much more flexible, and b) offers a batch facility that you can use for expedient processing of many images in a standardized way. So my bets are on Hugin right now.

I know what you mean. Even as I watched the video I was wondering how that trick was accomplished or how well it could possibly work. There wasn't enough detail in a youtube video to check for artifacts.

I can tell you what I saw in the video though. The demonstrator used a photo taken in a small room using a fisheye lens. There was quite a bit of perspective skewing to correct as well as the obvious barrel distortion. He started by straightening and cropping the photo, but I don't think he used a full rectilinear conversion and there was a section of tile floor visible in the center of the photo with some obvious residual barrel distortion. The portion of floor was bounded by walls and people in the room to form a sort of irregular polygon. He used a round selection tool to select this area of the floor then in a few quick keystrokes the barrel distortion was gone from the tile pattern in the floor but the overall shape of the bounded area hadn't changed.

I have continued to search for this demonstration and still haven't been able to find it. I probably dreamed it.

Let me know when you find it.

Still can't find the demo video, but I believe the software is called Panini-Pro .

In the documentation for the software it does talk about a spot-correction tool.

Edit: I just took a look at the hardware requirements for the software... I can't run it.

 clengman's gear list:clengman's gear list
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clengman
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to Anders W, Jan 22, 2013

Ah hah! Here is the demo . It's not exactly as I remembered it. The spot correction works on a circular area of the photo and does stretch or compress everything within that circle. Still, it looks like a nice piece of software.

 clengman's gear list:clengman's gear list
Olympus PEN E-PL1 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm 1:3.5-5.6 Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm 1:4-5.6 Rokinon 7.5mm 1:3.5 UMC Fisheye CS +4 more
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Anders W
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to clengman, Jan 22, 2013

clengman wrote:

Ah hah! Here is the demo . It's not exactly as I remembered it. The spot correction works on a circular area of the photo and does stretch or compress everything within that circle. Still, it looks like a nice piece of software.

Thanks! Will take a closer look as soon as I have a moment to spare.

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micksh6
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Re: Good for you! Enjoy it.
In reply to clengman, Jan 23, 2013

clengman wrote:

Ah hah! Here is the demo . It's not exactly as I remembered it. The spot correction works on a circular area of the photo and does stretch or compress everything within that circle. Still, it looks like a nice piece of software.

It's an interesting program, but I don't think it's still being developed, it's probably abandoned. There is similar mouse interface in Hugin, you probably can do everything what this program does in Hugin, except local corrections, perhaps. And I'm not sure about value of local corrections. Although, I only briefly tried Panini-Pro.

That projection rotation will be useful when during framing you fail to make straight horizontal line to go exactly through image center (when you wanted it to, in many cases it's a good thing).

Another very interesting software is adaptive wide angle filter in Photoshop CS6, but it's expensive. Don't know any direct substitutes for that. With this filter you can define which lines to straighten.

But, in most cases Hugin will be enough for everything. I use just Fisheye Hemy in Paint Shop Pro X4, and sometimes PSP built-in defishing just for simplicity and speed. Didn't research much more, except Hugin, which I rarely use only to correct framing mistakes - that horizontal line coming through center.

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