Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640

Started Nov 28, 2012 | Discussions
Christopher D Mann
Regular MemberPosts: 356Gear list
Like?
Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
Nov 28, 2012

I am getting ready to Buy a Einstein 640 and have been taking a look at the Pocket wizard Flex TT5 unit and the power MC2 for the flash. Just want to know user opinions of indoor and outdoor use. I already have a Plus 3 that I want to use on a speedlite and liked how I could use camera for flash adjustment on Einstein flash. Thanks

 Christopher D Mann's gear list:Christopher D Mann's gear list
Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Nik Silver Efex Pro
Christopher D Mann
Regular MemberPosts: 356Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Christopher D Mann, Dec 1, 2012

Really, no answer from anyone.

 Christopher D Mann's gear list:Christopher D Mann's gear list
Tamron SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Nik Silver Efex Pro
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Tihomir
Junior MemberPosts: 40
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Christopher D Mann, Dec 3, 2012

You won't be able to control the power output of the Einstein with the PocketWizard MC2. It is only working with small flashes (as far as I know). I'm not sure if the  works for non-Canon or non-Nikon flashes, but for sure it worked with a 580ExII that I had a year ago.

The power of the Einstein can be controlled with the Paul C Buff's CyberSync transmitters and receivers. This means you may sell your PocketWizards and buy CyberSyncs.

Most flashes that allow remote power control have either a dedicated remote control (separate from the flash triggering devices) or the power control is built into their proprietary transmitter and receiver.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Tihomir, Dec 3, 2012

Tihomir wrote:

You won't be able to control the power output of the Einstein with the PocketWizard MC2. It is only working with small flashes (as far as I know). I'm not sure if the works for non-Canon or non-Nikon flashes, but for sure it worked with a 580ExII that I had a year ago.

The power of the Einstein can be controlled with the Paul C Buff's CyberSync transmitters and receivers. This means you may sell your PocketWizards and buy CyberSyncs.

Most flashes that allow remote power control have either a dedicated remote control (separate from the flash triggering devices) or the power control is built into their proprietary transmitter and receiver.

you can control power on the einstein with the powermc2 module. The problem is that you can only set a 6 stop range with it so you cannot use the full range of the flash unit.

Until they fix this, I'll continue to use the Cyber Commander and CSXCV receiver

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Nikonparrothead
Veteran MemberPosts: 4,101Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 3, 2012

Jack, I know it's another piece of gear but Sekonic came out with that new meter wth the built in module for the PW flex system, I haven't seen much om it (PW postponed its webinar because of Sandy) but perhaps that would go beyond the six stop range.

-- hide signature --

'Nice pen, bet you write good stories with it.'

 Nikonparrothead's gear list:Nikonparrothead's gear list
Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ1 Canon PowerShot S95 Fujifilm FinePix X100 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 Nikon D3S +11 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Nikonparrothead, Dec 3, 2012

Nikonparrothead wrote:

Jack, I know it's another piece of gear but Sekonic came out with that new meter wth the built in module for the PW flex system, I haven't seen much om it (PW postponed its webinar because of Sandy) but perhaps that would go beyond the six stop range.

-- hide signature --

'Nice pen, bet you write good stories with it.'

i'll have to keep an eye out for it. I actually love the cyber commander except outdoors in the sun. Other than that, the functionality is awesome. But I tried to use it in the sun for a session a few days ago and it was a disaster. It kept turning my light off because it was so bright I thought I was toggling the standby for the light and i was actually toggling the modeling light. Didn't realize it until I was indoors. As soon as I got out of the bright sun, I could see what it was doing. Argh...

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
John Deerfield
Senior MemberPosts: 2,131
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 3, 2012

I don't see how a light meter could extend the 6-stop range as the range is a function of the AC3? And 6-stops down from full power is 1/64th, which is near useless outside. Additionally, you could skip the AC3 controller and simply use a Nikon flash in the commander mode and this gets you down to 1/128th.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to John Deerfield, Dec 3, 2012

John Deerfield wrote:

I don't see how a light meter could extend the 6-stop range as the range is a function of the AC3? And 6-stops down from full power is 1/64th, which is near useless outside. Additionally, you could skip the AC3 controller and simply use a Nikon flash in the commander mode and this gets you down to 1/128th.

6 stops down from full power would give you around F4 to F5.6 depending on distance and modifier.

If you are shooting at F2.0 the lower power settings are really useful. That's what makes the einstein such a great system. You can overpower the sun or use it as fill light at wide apertures.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
John Deerfield
Senior MemberPosts: 2,131
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 3, 2012

6 stops down from full power would give you around F4 to F5.6 depending on distance and modifier.

If you are shooting at F2.0 the lower power settings are really useful. That's what makes the einstein such a great system. You can overpower the sun or use it as fill light at wide apertures.

You are going to need to be pretty close to f/4 from 1/64th power. Regardless, the "easy" solution is a ND gel. Otherwise, you can program the MC2 to have a starting point lower than full power, giving you access to the minimum flash output. However, there isn't two customizable settings so you either need 2 MC2's (one for full power and one starting at say 1/4 power as the max) or you need the ability to change the MC2 in the field. I might think a ND filter is cheap, fast and easy. But that's me!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
pspentax
Regular MemberPosts: 278Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to John Deerfield, Dec 4, 2012

John Deerfield wrote:

6 stops down from full power would give you around F4 to F5.6 depending on distance and modifier.

If you are shooting at F2.0 the lower power settings are really useful. That's what makes the einstein such a great system. You can overpower the sun or use it as fill light at wide apertures.

You are going to need to be pretty close to f/4 from 1/64th power. Regardless, the "easy" solution is a ND gel. Otherwise, you can program the MC2 to have a starting point lower than full power, giving you access to the minimum flash output. However, there isn't two customizable settings so you either need 2 MC2's (one for full power and one starting at say 1/4 power as the max) or you need the ability to change the MC2 in the field. I might think a ND filter is cheap, fast and easy. But that's me!

No you don´t need two MC2.

You only need to put the AC3 in A mode and not in M mode and ad the flash +-2 stop compensatation in the camera to get the 8 full stop range of the Einstein.

PS - In the end you get 10 stops of variation

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

 pspentax's gear list:pspentax's gear list
Pentax K20D Pentax Q Canon EOS 5D Mark III Fujifilm X-E1 Sony Alpha 7R +13 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to pspentax, Dec 4, 2012

pspentax wrote:

John Deerfield wrote:

6 stops down from full power would give you around F4 to F5.6 depending on distance and modifier.

If you are shooting at F2.0 the lower power settings are really useful. That's what makes the einstein such a great system. You can overpower the sun or use it as fill light at wide apertures.

You are going to need to be pretty close to f/4 from 1/64th power. Regardless, the "easy" solution is a ND gel. Otherwise, you can program the MC2 to have a starting point lower than full power, giving you access to the minimum flash output. However, there isn't two customizable settings so you either need 2 MC2's (one for full power and one starting at say 1/4 power as the max) or you need the ability to change the MC2 in the field. I might think a ND filter is cheap, fast and easy. But that's me!

No you don´t need two MC2.

You only need to put the AC3 in A mode and not in M mode and ad the flash +-2 stop compensatation in the camera to get the 8 full stop range of the Einstein.

PS - In the end you get 10 stops of variation

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

what if you don't have the AC3? I think you're out of luck if you're shooting with the powermc2 and a miniTT1 and need the einstein's full range. For me personally, I decided to stick with the buff remotes.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
pspentax
Regular MemberPosts: 278Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 4, 2012

Jack A. Zucker wrote:

pspentax wrote:

John Deerfield wrote:

6 stops down from full power would give you around F4 to F5.6 depending on distance and modifier.

If you are shooting at F2.0 the lower power settings are really useful. That's what makes the einstein such a great system. You can overpower the sun or use it as fill light at wide apertures.

You are going to need to be pretty close to f/4 from 1/64th power. Regardless, the "easy" solution is a ND gel. Otherwise, you can program the MC2 to have a starting point lower than full power, giving you access to the minimum flash output. However, there isn't two customizable settings so you either need 2 MC2's (one for full power and one starting at say 1/4 power as the max) or you need the ability to change the MC2 in the field. I might think a ND filter is cheap, fast and easy. But that's me!

No you don´t need two MC2.

You only need to put the AC3 in A mode and not in M mode and ad the flash +-2 stop compensatation in the camera to get the 8 full stop range of the Einstein.

PS - In the end you get 10 stops of variation

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

what if you don't have the AC3? I think you're out of luck if you're shooting with the powermc2 and a miniTT1 and need the einstein's full range. For me personally, I decided to stick with the buff remotes.

I use the cybercomand in the studio/indoors and the Pocket wizard in the exterior.

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

 pspentax's gear list:pspentax's gear list
Pentax K20D Pentax Q Canon EOS 5D Mark III Fujifilm X-E1 Sony Alpha 7R +13 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Onetrack97
Senior MemberPosts: 1,928Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to pspentax, Dec 7, 2012

pspentax wrote:

I use the cybercomand in the studio/indoors and the Pocket wizard in the exterior.

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

I'm also thinking of switching to Pocket Wizard control for outdoor use.

From what I read, the way to do it is to use the MiniTT1 on the camera, set to only trigger.  Don't plug-in an AC3, use the Sekonic L-478DR for power control.  Power MC2 in the Einsten plus speedlights as needed.

I do need to understand if the Sekonic can control the full power range of the Einstein or if there is a work around.  Not sure which company of the three to ask but will start the process.

-- hide signature --

Scott

 Onetrack97's gear list:Onetrack97's gear list
Nikon D3 Nikon D7000 Nikon D800 Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Onetrack97, Dec 7, 2012

Onetrack97 wrote:

pspentax wrote:


I use the cybercomand in the studio/indoors and the Pocket wizard in the exterior.

-- hide signature --

Still shooting 35/120/220mm film

I'm also thinking of switching to Pocket Wizard control for outdoor use.

From what I read, the way to do it is to use the MiniTT1 on the camera, set to only trigger. Don't plug-in an AC3, use the Sekonic L-478DR for power control. Power MC2 in the Einsten plus speedlights as needed.

I do need to understand if the Sekonic can control the full power range of the Einstein or if there is a work around. Not sure which company of the three to ask but will start the process.

-- hide signature --

Scott

Please update us on this. I think the limitation on the power range is due to the useage of the flash exposure compensation range in the camera so hopefully the actual functionality of the interface within the PW supports a wider range. If not, that would really suck.

OTOH, I'm ok with using the cyber transmitter (sans commander) outside and manually adjusting the power. I don't like the idea of having to use multiple slave brands. Just another thing to worry about...

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Onetrack97
Senior MemberPosts: 1,928Gear list
Like?
Re: Pocket Wizard and Einstein 640
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 7, 2012

Here's what I got back from Pocket Wizard.  Pretty fast response.

Hi Scott,
Thank you for your inquiry. The Sekonic 478 has 6 stops of control. By default, this is the top six stops, starting at 1/1 power and down from there. You can connect the PowerMC2 to the PocketWizard Utility and adjust the Flash Exposure Compensation under the Flash tab. You can read more about this here: http://wiki.pocketwizard.com/index.php?title=Exposure_Tab
When using the AC3 to control power, you can actually use the mode switch in A to add the FEC from your camera body itself to your AC3 settings. This isn't a fully tested or verified method, but I tried it in the studio for a few minutes and it seems to work pretty well.
When replying to this email, please keep the case number in the subject line.

Best regards, Chris Valites
PocketWizard Support info@pocketwizard.com

 Onetrack97's gear list:Onetrack97's gear list
Nikon D3 Nikon D7000 Nikon D800 Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Jack A. Zucker
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,539
Like?
Too bad...They need to address this IMO
In reply to Onetrack97, Dec 7, 2012

Onetrack97 wrote:

Here's what I got back from Pocket Wizard. Pretty fast response.

Hi Scott,
Thank you for your inquiry. The Sekonic 478 has 6 stops of control. By default, this is the top six stops, starting at 1/1 power and down from there. You can connect the PowerMC2 to the PocketWizard Utility and adjust the Flash Exposure Compensation under the Flash tab. You can read more about this here: http://wiki.pocketwizard.com/index.php?title=Exposure_Tab
When using the AC3 to control power, you can actually use the mode switch in A to add the FEC from your camera body itself to your AC3 settings. This isn't a fully tested or verified method, but I tried it in the studio for a few minutes and it seems to work pretty well.
When replying to this email, please keep the case number in the subject line.

i did talk to buff and they have no plans to make an "outdoor" hardened commander.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Onetrack97
Senior MemberPosts: 1,928Gear list
Like?
Re: Too bad...They need to address this IMO
In reply to Jack A. Zucker, Dec 7, 2012

I'm OK with the CC outdoors.  I think in direct sun I can shield it enough.  Most of the time I'm not working in an open field and when I am, I'm probably working at or near full-power.

The newer one with the stubby antenna is much better than the original.

What I want with the Pocket Wizard solution is to be able to mix in speedlights with power control.  Most of the time, they have enough power plus I do want to be able to sync at higher speeds.  I'm considering two SB-910's on a stick as the main light.

Does anyone have recommendations on the best way to do the mounting?  I want to use shoot through umbrellas with closed back (Japanese Lantern).

I really wasn't that interested until the Sekonic 478 came out.  That makes things very interesting.  I can leave my camera on the tripod while I make measurements and adjustments from the subject's position.  The same things that I already do with the CyberCommander but with speedlight options.

-- hide signature --

Scott

 Onetrack97's gear list:Onetrack97's gear list
Nikon D3 Nikon D7000 Nikon D800 Nikon D7100
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads