D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment

Started Nov 9, 2012 | Discussions
keyshore
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D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
Nov 9, 2012

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

D700man
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Great question!  I have a D700 that i shoot for weddings also and am looking at the D800E very closely.  I don't think moire is much of a problem and if/when it does arise, it can be corrected in post prepossessing.  Also I believe the D800E doesn't inherit the dreaded left AF issue.

I've read that the D800/E is too slow and files are too big for wedding/event photography.  I'm not sure about that myself but I do wish Nikon would had created a sRAW so that we could keep our full frame with lower Mp instead of giving us the crop options.

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JacquesC
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

I think the D800/E might be good for weddings not because of the higher pixel count, but because of the better dynamic range. Other than that I don't see the D800/E having a huge advantage over a D700.

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Gosman
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

If you are going to shoot any video (like most wedding photographers do these days) along with stills, you will want the D800.  Can you imagine correcting moire on video?!!

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mbecke
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos.    Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld.   This issue cannot be overstated.    This camera has a specific use; it is probably not a good choice for handheld general photography.    I know others have stated differently that they can consistently obtain sharp photos handheld, but, frankly, I do not believe them.     Too many experts (i.e., Mr. Bjorn Rorslett, et al.) have discussed the generally poor, out of focus results, when trying to handhold this camera during general photography sessions.

It does not appear that the moire issue is all that much to worry about.   It seems to appear infrequently.

I think that Nikon is finally resolving the AF left side focus issue which heretofore was fairly pervasive in the D800/E cameras.    I would make certain, however, that I purchase a D800/E camera manufactured after October 15 or so.

Finally, yes, large files can be an issue when taking numerous photographs.    They can be a bit unwieldy.

Good luck with your decision!

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John Motts
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos. Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld. This issue cannot be overstated. This camera has a specific use; it is probably not a good choice for handheld general photography. I know others have stated differently that they can consistently obtain sharp photos handheld, but, frankly, I do not believe them. Too many experts (i.e., Mr. Bjorn Rorslett, et al.) have discussed the generally poor, out of focus results, when trying to handhold this camera during general photography sessions.

This is a myth and is plain wrong. The D800 does not take take out of focus pictures due to high resolution. By that logic, the sharpest photographs would be from cameras like the D1.

The D800 is absolutely fine for hand held photography. Having a high resolution camera does not cause camera shake and high resolution certainly doesn't pictures to be out of focus.

Shots from a D800 won't be any worse than from any other camera. The only difference is that the extra detail means that you can enlarge it to much higher levels and therefore any issues can be seen more clearly. At any given size of reproduction, the D800 files will not be worse.

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Fred Braun
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

This guy might disagree with your statement.

http://billmcdad.com/

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mbecke
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to John Motts, Nov 9, 2012

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos. Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld. This issue cannot be overstated. This camera has a specific use; it is probably not a good choice for handheld general photography. I know others have stated differently that they can consistently obtain sharp photos handheld, but, frankly, I do not believe them. Too many experts (i.e., Mr. Bjorn Rorslett, et al.) have discussed the generally poor, out of focus results, when trying to handhold this camera during general photography sessions.

This is a myth and is plain wrong. The D800 does not take take out of focus pictures due to high resolution. By that logic, the sharpest photographs would be from cameras like the D1.

The D800 is absolutely fine for hand held photography. Having a high resolution camera does not cause camera shake and it certainly doesn't cause camera shake.

Shots from a D800 won't be any worse than from any other camera. The only difference is that the extra detail means that you can enlarge it to much higher levels and therefore any issues can be seen more clearly. At any given size of reproduction, the D800 files will not be worse.

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong.    When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above.    There will be no retraction from me on this issue.    In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains.    It is that simple.      This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

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Meganrogers
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

I went straight to the non-E's afraid that the E would show too much moire in lace etc. The D800 gives ample  sharpness and resolution (too much for  for most brides if you know what I mean) so I can't imagine ever needing the D800E.  I talked to a friend who uses an E and says moire is hardly ever an issue but he doesn't do weddings.  As for the left focus error, it seems to be present in some bodies to different degrees but Nikon has a fix. I had this problem with one body and had to work around it till I had a chance to send it in.

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John Motts
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos. Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld. This issue cannot be overstated. This camera has a specific use; it is probably not a good choice for handheld general photography. I know others have stated differently that they can consistently obtain sharp photos handheld, but, frankly, I do not believe them. Too many experts (i.e., Mr. Bjorn Rorslett, et al.) have discussed the generally poor, out of focus results, when trying to handhold this camera during general photography sessions.

This is a myth and is plain wrong. The D800 does not take take out of focus pictures due to high resolution. By that logic, the sharpest photographs would be from cameras like the D1.

The D800 is absolutely fine for hand held photography. Having a high resolution camera does not cause camera shake and it certainly doesn't cause camera shake.

Shots from a D800 won't be any worse than from any other camera. The only difference is that the extra detail means that you can enlarge it to much higher levels and therefore any issues can be seen more clearly. At any given size of reproduction, the D800 files will not be worse.

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue.

The experts all agree that if you want to take advantage of the high resolution of the D800, then obviously you have to work harder at it, but to suggest that the higher resolution causes a lot more photographs to be "out of focus" is complete nonsense.

For any given size of reproduction, particularly the kind of size that a wedding photographer is likely to produce, there is no difference. Produce a 16x12 or a 20x30 print from a D800 and you will not see any softer results than you would from a D700.

Do you honestly believe that it is more difficult to obtain sharp in-focus results from a 12mp D700 than it is from a 4mp D2H?

People who believe this are the people who compare images at 100% and wonder why they aren't as sharp.

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Mako2011
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In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E,.....

You seem to be mistaken:

it appears you may be wrong

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John Motts
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue. In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains. It is that simple. This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

Just to add to this, it's not the resolution of the camera that is the issue, but the size of reproduction that counts here. The D800 produces results that can be enlarged to a much greater extent.

An analogy: in the film days, a lower speed film would produce superior resolution to an equivalent higher speed film. Would you suggest that the higher resolution film would be more prone to "out of focus" results than the lower resolution film? Of course you wouldn't.

If you said that producing huge prints from that film would highlight any issues more than producing smaller prints, then you would be making sense.

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primeshooter
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos. Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld. This issue cannot be overstated. This camera has a specific use; it is probably not a good choice for handheld general photography. I know others have stated differently that they can consistently obtain sharp photos handheld, but, frankly, I do not believe them. Too many experts (i.e., Mr. Bjorn Rorslett, et al.) have discussed the generally poor, out of focus results, when trying to handhold this camera during general photography sessions.

This is a myth and is plain wrong. The D800 does not take take out of focus pictures due to high resolution. By that logic, the sharpest photographs would be from cameras like the D1.

The D800 is absolutely fine for hand held photography. Having a high resolution camera does not cause camera shake and it certainly doesn't cause camera shake.

Shots from a D800 won't be any worse than from any other camera. The only difference is that the extra detail means that you can enlarge it to much higher levels and therefore any issues can be seen more clearly. At any given size of reproduction, the D800 files will not be worse.

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue. In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains. It is that simple. This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

I'm sorry, you are wrong mbecke. I get perfectly sharp handheld shots at 100%. Technique will assist you in getting this if you are not already.

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primeshooter
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to John Motts, Nov 9, 2012

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue. In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains. It is that simple. This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

Just to add to this, it's not the resolution of the camera that is the issue, but the size of reproduction that counts here. The D800 produces results that can be enlarged to a much greater extent.

An analogy: in the film days, a lower speed film would produce superior resolution to an equivalent higher speed film. Would you suggest that the higher resolution film would be more prone to "out of focus" results than the lower resolution film? Of course you wouldn't.

If you said that producing huge prints from that film would highlight any issues more than producing smaller prints, then you would be making sense.

Well said. This myth is so old and boring now.

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mbecke
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to primeshooter, Nov 9, 2012

primeshooter wrote:

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue. In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains. It is that simple. This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

Just to add to this, it's not the resolution of the camera that is the issue, but the size of reproduction that counts here. The D800 produces results that can be enlarged to a much greater extent.

An analogy: in the film days, a lower speed film would produce superior resolution to an equivalent higher speed film. Would you suggest that the higher resolution film would be more prone to "out of focus" results than the lower resolution film? Of course you wouldn't.

If you said that producing huge prints from that film would highlight any issues more than producing smaller prints, then you would be making sense.

Well said. This myth is so old and boring now.

No, the "myth" is accurate.    Look folks, the OP's question relates to "wedding photography."    The recent posts above ignore how the OP's camera will be utilized.    Wedding photography is often done in low light conditions.    To avoid blurry handheld photos due to camera shake, a camera such as the D800/E absolutely needs to be used at much higher shutter speeds.    Thus, these higher shutter speed requirements in order to obtain sharp photographs handheld do not make this camera a particularly good candidate for low light wedding photos.    The alternative, I suppose, would be to jack up ISO (degrading picture quality) or going with wider apertures (reducing depth of field).    However, neither option is likely to be a good one for wedding photography.     If you cracker jacks above had properly considered how the OP was going to use his/her camera, you could have omitted your irrelevant comments.    You are going to get blurry photos hand holding the D800/E camera under these conditions.

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OldDigiman
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

Based upon what I have read thus far, the D800/E is a camera that should be used on a tripod for portraiture and landscape photos. Apparently, the ultra-high megapixel count amplifies any defect in technique and can result in many out of focus photographs -- particularly when the camera is handheld.

I'm sorry, this is utter nonsense.  The high megapixel count cannot induce more image degradation as a result of camera shake or poor focus -- it merely makes those defects more apparent at 100% viewing.  Camera shake or poor focus will not be more apparent if the files are downsized to the resolution of a D700, or if printed.  Whether the D800 has focus issues is a question that is totally separate from the pixel count of the sensor.

More FUD from the uninformed.

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KnightPhoto2
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to keyshore, Nov 9, 2012

keyshore wrote:

Hi,

I shoot interiors and weddings using the D 700, I am now thinking of upgrading to the D 800 E, Wedding photographers do you encounter a lot of moire in a typical wedding situation? I am also reading some user reviews of the D 800 who report a left focusing problems.

Has this issue been sorted out in the D 800E? and is this a good choice for me over the D 800?

Please comment.

Regards,

Keyshore

More to the point... you will need a good skin softening PP technique as part of your standard workflow.  The camera is SHARP!

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OldDigiman
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

mbecke wrote:

primeshooter wrote:

John Motts wrote:

mbecke wrote:

Absolutely wrong, wrong, wrong. When many of the well known photography experts point out the difficulty of obtaining sharp handheld photos with the D800/E, the myth becomes your comment above. There will be no retraction from me on this issue. In any event, I would recommend that the OP attempt to use a D800/E handheld and see what type of results he/she obtains. It is that simple. This is indeed a portrait/landscape camera that should definitely be used on a tripod for good results.

Just to add to this, it's not the resolution of the camera that is the issue, but the size of reproduction that counts here. The D800 produces results that can be enlarged to a much greater extent.

An analogy: in the film days, a lower speed film would produce superior resolution to an equivalent higher speed film. Would you suggest that the higher resolution film would be more prone to "out of focus" results than the lower resolution film? Of course you wouldn't.

If you said that producing huge prints from that film would highlight any issues more than producing smaller prints, then you would be making sense.

Well said. This myth is so old and boring now.

No, the "myth" is accurate. Look folks, the OP's question relates to "wedding photography." The recent posts above ignore how the OP's camera will be utilized. Wedding photography is often done in low light conditions. To avoid blurry handheld photos due to camera shake, a camera such as the D800/E absolutely needs to be used at much higher shutter speeds. Thus, these higher shutter speed requirements in order to obtain sharp photographs handheld do not make this camera a particularly good candidate for low light wedding photos. The alternative, I suppose, would be to jack up ISO (degrading picture quality) or going with wider apertures (reducing depth of field). However, neither option is likely to be a good one for wedding photography. If you cracker jacks above had properly considered how the OP was going to use his/her camera, you could have omitted your irrelevant comments. You are going to get blurry photos hand holding the D800/E camera under these conditions.

Hello?  You are going to get blurry photos from ANY camera under those conditions.

DXOmark's highest ISO score is for the D3s at 3253, the D800E is third best at 2979.  The D700 is rated 2303.  So you don't have to shoot at a significantly lower ISO with the D800 than any other camera.

The idea that you have to shoot at higher shutter speed with the D800/E to avoid camera shake is just more stupidity.

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HarryBo
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to mbecke, Nov 9, 2012

John Mots is fully correct in his statements. The final enlargement is the determining factor. As long as the wedding photographer produces same size prints from D700 and D800e it won't make a difference. Viewing at 100% or printing larger than the D700 highest acceptable size might show a difference but hey, than you are a) not comparing same enlargement sizes...b) comparing different resolving power anyway

Otherwise would you suggest the OP wedding photographer suddenly would deliver bigger prints because he has a D800(e) ? Benefit would still be with the d800e and not with the D700 for again the same size of print

With respect strongly suggest you give it another thought and reconsider who is the cracker jack...:)

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fft81
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Re: D 800E Wedding Photographers please comment
In reply to HarryBo, Nov 9, 2012

I have D800. I find it hard to shoot indoors without a flash using nikon 24-70. Don't even think about shooting d800 freehand slower than 1/125th of a second without VR. Outside the 24-70 at 1/500th of a second or faster works very well. I absolutely love 70-200 VR2 on the d800. I still have not tried 14-24 on it, but that is not a lens you would use for most weddings anyways. If you going to shoot d800 get a mono-pod for indoor shots or 70-200 vr2 in decent light might cut it.

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