Attention Tamron 24-70 VC owners

Started Jul 28, 2012 | Discussions
HSway
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Re: Attention Tamron 24-70 VC owners
In reply to joonee1988, Aug 1, 2012

The VC not functioning at 1/60 is a bit disappointing.

You can try what results you are getting in Q mode. this can also change the VC response. I shoot handheld all the time in Q mode and actually love it for more reasons and the sharpness I get (on d7000). I'd recommend trying it out if you decide to keep it, or better before that.

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joonee1988
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Re: VC works - turn off VC at shutter speeds above 1/60s
In reply to inasir1971, Aug 2, 2012

I think it is stupid that the user has to check the shutter speed constantly and turn the VC on or off. I contacted the Tamron distributor here, and they said that a firmware update is coming in a few weeks. Hopefully, the issue will be worked out through it.

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inasir1971
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Another issue - with D4's
In reply to joonee1988, Aug 2, 2012

How are they going to update the firmware on existing lenses - is it possible?

The Tamron's VC plays nice with the D800 (tested with grip) at shutter speeds below 1/60s.

However, it doesn't work well with the D4. There is always a small amount of motion blur (say 1 pixel).

I like the lens optically.

However - they NEED to sort this out as the VC was what I was after.

joonee1988 wrote:

I think it is stupid that the user has to check the shutter speed constantly and turn the VC on or off. I contacted the Tamron distributor here, and they said that a firmware update is coming in a few weeks. Hopefully, the issue will be worked out through it.

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inasir1971
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speed to switch VC off is 1/40s not 1/60s
In reply to inasir1971, Aug 2, 2012

Speed to switch VC off is 1/40s. So if using the auto minimum shutter speed function on the D800/E & D4 auto should be set to -1 notch (actually -2 notches works fine).

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Mako2011
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often
In reply to inasir1971, Aug 2, 2012

inasir1971 wrote:

How are they going to update the firmware on existing lenses - is it possible?

Done a lot as new bodies come out. If the 3rd party lens makers couldn't do it...they would quickly lose customers I think as bodies change so often.

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Mako2011
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epic fail
In reply to inasir1971, Aug 2, 2012

inasir1971 wrote:

Speed to switch VC off is 1/40s. So if using the auto minimum shutter speed function on the D800/E & D4 auto should be set to -1 notch (actually -2 notches works fine).

If the required technique is to turn off VC at faster than 1/60s....I really can't see buying this lens when a VR lens is an option. Blurring due to VC faster than 1/60s is not a con...it's a failure in design and completely unacceptable, IMO.

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Leonard Migliore
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That's the way to look at it
In reply to Mako2011, Aug 2, 2012

Mako2011 wrote:

inasir1971 wrote:

Speed to switch VC off is 1/40s. So if using the auto minimum shutter speed function on the D800/E & D4 auto should be set to -1 notch (actually -2 notches works fine).

If the required technique is to turn off VC at faster than 1/60s....I really can't see buying this lens when a VR lens is an option. Blurring due to VC faster than 1/60s is not a con...it's a failure in design and completely unacceptable, IMO.

You are so right. This stuff is supposed to help you, not make your life harder. I understand VC is not going to be helpful above a certain shutter speed but it shouldn't introduce more blur than if you had it off.
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inasir1971
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Re: That's the way to look at it
In reply to Leonard Migliore, Aug 2, 2012

Leonard Migliore wrote:

You are so right. This stuff is supposed to help you, not make your life harder. I understand VC is not going to be helpful above a certain shutter speed but it shouldn't introduce more blur than if you had it off.
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Yes - this is a failure. What I don't understand is that it functions incredibly well below that. At some point it should disable itself (above certain certain shutter speeds etc.). Most VR/IS systems do this (on tripods etc.) and Tamron have been making VC lenses for a while so this shouldn't be a new problem.

You can get pixel sharp images of really distant subjects handheld at 1/20s at 70mm, and it can't handle this. Optically, I like it. And when the VC works it is really really good.

Anyway, I have emailed Tamron seeking to contact their technical side as it is obviously a design aspect, hopefully firmware fix will be available.

Hopefully a fix will be out soon.

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alex111
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Re: That's the way to look at it
In reply to inasir1971, Oct 23, 2012

I am  about to receive this lens.  Could some one tell me if the issues with aperture and VR have been resolved?

Thanks

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beast625
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Re: That's the way to look at it
In reply to Leonard Migliore, Oct 23, 2012

Shot an outdoor birthday party with the Tamron 24-70 this weekend.  D600, VC on, handheld, bright sun, and all with shutter speeds in excess of 1/60.  I did not see any hint of image degradation due to VC being on at higher shutter speeds.

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alex111
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Re: That's the way to look at it
In reply to beast625, Oct 23, 2012

Thank you for the repliy.  Beautiful pictures.  I just got the lens and have done some testing.  I do not see any problems with vc at any shutter speed with my copy.  I did noticed that my aperture is slightly off.  From f2.8 to f3.2  there is very slight difference in exposure.  From there one it behaves normal.  Also there is smallt play in the zoomin ring.  Does any one else's copy exhibits this?

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amateurtony
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Re: Problem #2: Aperture lever miscalibration
In reply to Horshack, Jan 26, 2013

I too recently bought this lens (1 week ago). I found it has the lever miscalibrated also. I can tell from running the tests suggest here as well as actually physicall looking at the aperture blades moving. When I move the lever handle, the aperture blades do not immediately move. It only moves after I move the lever about 1mm then does the aperture blades make a noticeable movement.

HERES THE GOOD NEWS! ITS EASY TO FIX!

Being somewhat handy myself, I decided to see if I can manually calibrate it myself so I don't have to waste time sending it anywhere. After spending an hour (learning, reading http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2013/01/24-70mm-f2-8-lens-teardown-comparison) and then finally got the courage to do it, spent about 10 minutes getting it fixed.

HERES HOW!

Disclaimer: Try at your own risk! I take absolutely NO responsibility for what you do with this information. You CAN break your lens. Don't blame me if you try it.

Tools: Philips screwdriver, smallest possible. flat head may work too, its what I used.

Philips screwdriver, small size, but bigger than the first one.

Being handy with tools is a plus.

Note: Do not touch the rear lens element throughout this entire process please. You don't want to dirty it up.

Step 1: The mount is metal and inside that mount is the plastic rear with the electrical contacts. There are 4 tiny screws holding this plastic ring in place. Theres also 1 tiny screw that sticks out of the metal mount (ignore this one, don't take it out). Take those 4 screws holding the inner plastic piece out with a tiny eyeglass screw driver. You'll need the smallest possible screw driver you can find to do it. It can also be screwed in quite tight, so be careful not to strip it. The 2 that connects to the electrical contacts are ever so slightly longer than the other two screws, so just remember and keep that separate.

Step 2: Once unscrewed, carefully take the plastic piece on out. The electrical contact piece is free from the plastic ring, but is attached to the lens. Do not take out this electrical contact piece! Just take the ring out.

Once the ring is out, you will see the aperture lever arm attached with 2 screws. These screws are what you need to adjust. Loosen these two screws so you can adjust the lever arm. They are designed to be movable so that it can be calibrated!

step 3: The way I did the calibration is this: loosen the screws

Pull the lever arm on the mount to the end so it contacts the stopper. Keep it in this position with your left thumb the entire time, this is your maximum aperture state. Now you want to move the bottom piece of the arm using the screws. I push the arm ever so slightly at the screws until the aperture blade starts moving. It helps to see the aperture blade if you take the lens cap off, and keep the shade petal on. Once you see the aperture blade start moving, move the screws back slightly so its JUST back to the maximum aperture, and tighten the screws! This part is trick, as you tighten the first screw, the arm will move slightly, so make sure to carefully do this part to prevent moving the arm at all. If you see any movement of the aperture blades, then your maximum aperture will not be 2.8 anymore. If the blades move, just loosen the screws ever so slightly again and adjust again. Do this step right or else you will not have the best results!

Once you get the screws tighten, just fit the plastic ring and electrical contact back the way it was before and screw it back together. You're almost done!

Test the camera and aperture to see if everything works, and if the aperture is correct now!

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Daniel Lauring
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Re: Problem #2: Aperture lever miscalibration
In reply to amateurtony, Jan 29, 2013

amateurtony wrote:

I too recently bought this lens (1 week ago). I found it has the lever miscalibrated also. I can tell from running the tests suggest here as well as actually physicall looking at the aperture blades moving. When I move the lever handle, the aperture blades do not immediately move. It only moves after I move the lever about 1mm then does the aperture blades make a noticeable movement.

HERES THE GOOD NEWS! ITS EASY TO FIX!

Being somewhat handy myself, I decided to see if I can manually calibrate it myself so I don't have to waste time sending it anywhere. After spending an hour (learning, reading http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2013/01/24-70mm-f2-8-lens-teardown-comparison) and then finally got the courage to do it, spent about 10 minutes getting it fixed.

HERES HOW!

Disclaimer: Try at your own risk! I take absolutely NO responsibility for what you do with this information. You CAN break your lens. Don't blame me if you try it.

Tools: Philips screwdriver, smallest possible. flat head may work too, its what I used.

Philips screwdriver, small size, but bigger than the first one.

Being handy with tools is a plus.

Note: Do not touch the rear lens element throughout this entire process please. You don't want to dirty it up.

Step 1: The mount is metal and inside that mount is the plastic rear with the electrical contacts. There are 4 tiny screws holding this plastic ring in place. Theres also 1 tiny screw that sticks out of the metal mount (ignore this one, don't take it out). Take those 4 screws holding the inner plastic piece out with a tiny eyeglass screw driver. You'll need the smallest possible screw driver you can find to do it. It can also be screwed in quite tight, so be careful not to strip it. The 2 that connects to the electrical contacts are ever so slightly longer than the other two screws, so just remember and keep that separate.

Step 2: Once unscrewed, carefully take the plastic piece on out. The electrical contact piece is free from the plastic ring, but is attached to the lens. Do not take out this electrical contact piece! Just take the ring out.

Once the ring is out, you will see the aperture lever arm attached with 2 screws. These screws are what you need to adjust. Loosen these two screws so you can adjust the lever arm. They are designed to be movable so that it can be calibrated!

step 3: The way I did the calibration is this: loosen the screws

Pull the lever arm on the mount to the end so it contacts the stopper. Keep it in this position with your left thumb the entire time, this is your maximum aperture state. Now you want to move the bottom piece of the arm using the screws. I push the arm ever so slightly at the screws until the aperture blade starts moving. It helps to see the aperture blade if you take the lens cap off, and keep the shade petal on. Once you see the aperture blade start moving, move the screws back slightly so its JUST back to the maximum aperture, and tighten the screws! This part is trick, as you tighten the first screw, the arm will move slightly, so make sure to carefully do this part to prevent moving the arm at all. If you see any movement of the aperture blades, then your maximum aperture will not be 2.8 anymore. If the blades move, just loosen the screws ever so slightly again and adjust again. Do this step right or else you will not have the best results!

Once you get the screws tighten, just fit the plastic ring and electrical contact back the way it was before and screw it back together. You're almost done!

Test the camera and aperture to see if everything works, and if the aperture is correct now!

Thank you. I would like to add what I found with my lens which exhibited similar behavior, and some more do-it-yourself tips.

Couldn't measure a difference between F2.8 all the way to F3.5 with my lens. I took it apart, per instructions and adjusted it, and it was much better, but it still seemed like there wasn't as much difference in exposure, between F2.8 and F3.2, as there was between F3.2 and F3.5, or F3.5 and F4, so I opened it up again and this time I really biased it towards the open aperture side. The result was worse yet. No difference at all between F2.8 and F4. So I went back in and biased it the other way...to opening less, and it worked the best. There is something going on with the calibration that requires the lever to be adjusted in the proper range. It might have to do with the stackup (engineering term) between the base lever, the window in the plastic piece you remove to adjust it, and the camera body's aperture tab.

So, here are my tips.

Tip #1: Before you remove the plastic ring, make note of where the lever is working in the range of the window. If it is moving the blades immediately, and having lots of room on the other end, where the blades stop opening, but the lever keeps traveling, you have an adjustment issue. If it doesn't move the blades for a bit of travel, you probably also have an adjustment issue. You want the entire blade movement to work inside the range of the window.

Tip #2: The screws are small and easy to lose, so work on a white surface. Laying out a white sheet is a good way to go.

Tip #3: A magnetized screwdriver will help you get the loosened screws out, and help hold them in alignment when you put them back in. If you don't have a magnetized screwdriver you can make one by attaching a small magnet to the shaft of your screwdriver...a strong kitchen magnet works.

Tip #4: Zooming to 70mm will move the rear lens element out of your way and you will be less likely to smudge it.

Tip #5: Take a picture of the position of the adjustment screws before you close it back up. If you have to readjust it will help to know where you started from last time, because as soon as you loosen the screws the assembly can move and you won't know which way to move it.

Tip #5: To check your work, use manual mode (M) and switch to manual ISO. Then set the camera up on a tripod and take pictures from F2.8 to F5.6. View the histogram. You should see it moving from light to dark at every aperture change. If it stays the same through the first few apertures you need to readjust it. Test at the wide side (24mm.) It isn't uncommon for constant aperture lenses to not meet there widest aperture at the long end of their range. The Tamron is no exception. There is a much bigger histogram difference between F2.8 and F3.2 at 24mm than at 70mm because the lens is aperture limited at 70mm.

Or...just send it back to Tamron for them to service it.

Good luck.

P.S.  This lens is amazingly sharp even wide open....once you get it there.

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Daniel Lauring
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Aperture recalibration before and after
In reply to Daniel Lauring, Jan 30, 2013

Album showing before and after pics of calibration

Unfortunately, I don't have the exact same settings before and after, but you can see the difference change as the aperture is stepped through F2.8 to F4

Before (notice how the histogram doesn't move.)

After:

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Daniel Lauring
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Aperture change comparing 70mm to 24mm
In reply to Daniel Lauring, Jan 30, 2013

Here is a set comparing the change in aperture at 70mm to the change in aperture at 24mm.

70mm:

24mm (the histogram starts out different because it is zoomed out with more dark in the frame):

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Daniel Lauring
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Photos of screws that get removed and piece that stays with lens.
In reply to Daniel Lauring, Jan 31, 2013

Here is a photo of the 4 screws that need to be removed.

Here is a photo wth the electrical contact piece that remains with the lens.  The plastic ring behind the contact lifts out.  It is under the contact piece but the contact piece will rock out of the way.

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pipee
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Re: Photos of screws that get removed and piece that stays with lens.
In reply to Daniel Lauring, Mar 5, 2013

Just wondering, if Tamron has fixed the issue on the current production batches.

Has anybody bought the 24-70 Nikon mount and NOT have the aperture issue?

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Bram1982
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Re: Photos of screws that get removed and piece that stays with lens.
In reply to pipee, Mar 18, 2013

pipee wrote:

Just wondering, if Tamron has fixed the issue on the current production batches.

Has anybody bought the 24-70 Nikon mount and NOT have the aperture issue?

Tamron 24-70 on D800 user reporting: Still not fixed. Can't tell for sure how long it's been on the store shelves though. Don't have any issues with the VC btw.

Fix above is real easy though... Unless you're a real idiot when it comes to screwdrivers it'a not really worth the hassle to send it back to Tamron.

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