Monitor Calibration question

Started Jul 19, 2012 | Discussions
digitalshooter
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Monitor Calibration question
Jul 19, 2012

OK as I understand it, if you have a dark print and your monitor pic looks GREAT your monitor is too bright, corrrect?

So here is my question: What do you do if your monitor is set to 0 brightness?

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Dennis Lathem
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Re: Monitor Calibration question
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 19, 2012

You answered you own question in the title of your post. You need to calibrate your monitor and use a printer profile to ensure your prints look like the monitor you have edited the photo on. Color management is not really difficult and will save you lots of time.

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digitalshooter
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Yeah I guess I did, currently my spyder 3 pro is reaking
In reply to Dennis Lathem, Jul 19, 2012

havoc on my systems, cant get it to calibrate correctly. Working with them on this but I think a new calibrating system may be in order.

I quess I was looking for some reassurance that calibration would resolve, since calibration is touchy.

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digitalshooter
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Thanks (nt)
In reply to Pictus, Jul 19, 2012
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Bob Collette
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Re: Monitor Calibration question
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 19, 2012

If the print looks good, as does the monitor, however the monitor is too bright, you need to reduce the monitor luminance (as you noted). If the Brightness control is already at zero, try reducing the Contrast control setting. The Contrast control has a large effect on the luminance.

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digitalshooter
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Thanks will check that also (nt)
In reply to Bob Collette, Jul 19, 2012
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Dennis Lathem
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Re: Yeah I guess I did, currently my spyder 3 pro is reaking
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 19, 2012

Sorry, I could not tell from your post that you had already attempted to use a hardware calibration system. I have had two different SYPDER devices over the last 5 years. The both worked well. Good luck on getting everything straightened out. I know how madding it can be.
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NewsyL
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Re: Monitor Calibration question
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 20, 2012

digitalshooter wrote:

OK as I understand it, if you have a dark print and your monitor pic looks GREAT your monitor is too bright, corrrect?

So here is my question: What do you do if your monitor is set to 0 brightness?

Increase the ambient lighting a bit.

Btw... what monitor do you have?

.

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Supr X
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Re: Monitor Calibration question
In reply to NewsyL, Jul 20, 2012

NewsyL wrote:

digitalshooter wrote:

OK as I understand it, if you have a dark print and your monitor pic looks GREAT your monitor is too bright, corrrect?

So here is my question: What do you do if your monitor is set to 0 brightness?

Increase the ambient lighting a bit.

-what I would suggest . . .

Btw... what monitor do you have?

Yes, what are you working on?

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digitalshooter
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monitor
In reply to NewsyL, Jul 20, 2012

How will increasing the ambient help?

Viewsonic VP950B

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Pictus
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Re: monitor
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 20, 2012

digitalshooter wrote:

How will increasing the ambient help?

To view a print as you can see in the previous links, is much better to just light the print and not the whole area, look at the Colour Confidence GrafiLite http://www.dpreview.com/articles/0967807691/buyers-guide-10-essential-color-management-devices/2

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NewsyL
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Re: monitor
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 20, 2012

digitalshooter wrote:

How will increasing the ambient help?

Viewsonic VP950B

re: Viewsonic VP950B

I was hoping it would be something more recent with test results from a review site that documents the back light brightness.

What I do know is that it uses a 19" "TN" tft LCD panel which offers a simulated 8bit color depth - it's actually a 6bit panel that uses an older version of Frame Rate Control (FRC) to simulate a color depth in excess of 16.2 million colors. The stated maximum brightness is 280 cd/m2 which is far far too bright for image work so like most monitors you need to adjust this into an area most appropriate in balance against the ambient lighting of the room you edit in.

A number of recently tested budget class monitors were shown to be unable to adjust their brightness below 130 cd/m2 of white luminance which is still too high for most home office dens/offices where people edit in the evening (i.e. no sunlight streaming in through windows) using one or two 800 lumen bulbs to light a room. Typically, most people will want a level between 100 and 120 cd/m2 though for a very dark room, maybe as low as 80 cd/m2.

The room you edit images in should have controlled lighting - i.e. no open windows that allow random light in from outside. Blinds are essential so that the ambient light in the room remains about the same as per when you calibrate your monitor.

You can use extra lamps to bring the ambient light level up to help prevent dark prints because what you are doing is addressing a perceptual weakness of the human eye/brain.

.
re: raising ambient lighting

You're likely aware of how the human eye can be fooled into thinking that certain shades of color or gray are different even though they are the same, depending on the shade placed alongside the swatch that you're examining. So it is with the brightness of your monitor in relation to the room around it.

Think of your back lit monitor as being something like a 19" diagonal spotlight shining in your eyes. If the room around the monitor is very dark, the monitor will appear brighter to your eye and any images on it will be perceived to be too bright so that they require that their levels be adjusted lower - hence when printed, you get dark prints.

If you raise the ambient light level, it will seem that the monitor is not as bright as before even though you have not touched the monitor's controls. If you raise the ambient room lighting too much, the monitor will appear dark in relation to the room lighting and you may actually be tempted to raise the levels of the image. If printed these images would appear too light.

I know with the Spyder 4 Pro that it reports the white luminance of the monitor at one point in the "advanced" mode of calibration. I can't recall if this is also shown in the Spyder 3 Pro's software.

What you can do is the following as a rough estimate of what the "balanced" ambient light level is for your monitor.

.
Eyeball Technique

A rough method of setting brightness is to grab a sheaf of white printer paper (several pages thick) and hold it up next to your monitor while it is displaying a white screen (full screen Notepad works well) and while the room has its' typical lighting used while you edit. If the paper looks brighter than your monitor, then your monitor is too dark. If the paper is darker, then the monitor is too bright or perhaps you need to increase the ambient lighting of the room. Imho, it is less than ideal to edit in a near pitch black room.

Most LCD monitors have a native color temperature somewhere near 6500K in order to have whites appear like they would in natural sunlight. Most people still use incandescent or CFL bulbs with a color temperature near 2800K for their room lighting.

Under this traditional lighting the reflected room light off the paper will, in comparison to the monitor screen, appear more yellow (warmer) and this may make you think it is a little darker. You may want to buy some 6000 to 6500K compact fluorescent bulbs, of equal lumen output, for the lighting in your room and use them while attempting this paper method. If these are too blue (cool) for day to day use in your editing room, 5000K bulbs may be a workable compromise.

Try this and let us know what your initial results are.

PS... dark prints can also be the result of a mismatch with printer ICC profiles and paper and/or how the printer is set up to use these - we sometimes see the term "double profiling" use in reference to this.

.

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bronxbombers
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Re: monitor
In reply to digitalshooter, Jul 20, 2012

digitalshooter wrote:

How will increasing the ambient help?

makes the prints look less dark, shadow details that were hard to see are suddenly easy to see

if no amount of ambient light increase makes things look right then either your monitor's tone response is not properly calibrated or the programs being used are not using the profile or not using it properly or the printer's profile is not so good

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Pictus
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**Update** Monitor Calibration question
In reply to Pictus, 3 months ago

Some interesting links: *Update*

Practical guidelines and references for digital photographers
http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/WGuidelines.pdf

Everything you thought you wanted to know about Color Gamut and RGB Working Spaces
High resolution: http://digitaldog.net/files/ColorGamut.mov
Low Res (YouTube): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0bxSD-Xx-Q

COLOR MANAGEMENT & PRINTING
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/color-management-printing.htm
Soft Proofing with Lightroom 4
http://digitaldog.net/files/LR4_softproof.mov
http://digitaldog.net/files/LR4_softproof2.mov

Using Printer Profiles with Digital Labs
http://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/using_printer_profiles.htm

Why are my prints too dark?
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/why_are_my_prints_too_dark.shtml

DPI, PPI, printer resolution
http://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-forum/digital-post-processing-forum/115989-digital-printing-pixels-resolution-resampling.html
http://www.rags-int-inc.com/PhotoTechStuff/Epson2200/

http://www.digitalphotopro.com/technique/workflow/the-right-resolution.html
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=54798.msg446993#msg446993
"here's a simpler guideline for Epson printers; if your image's native size is less than 360PPI, set the resolution in LR to 360 for the output resolution, if the image's native size is above 360 but less than 720PPI, set the resolution to 720PPI in LR.
For Canon and HP the numbers are 300/600PPI..."

Beyond Adobe RGB
http://www.naturephotographers.net/articles1203/mh1203-1.html

Monitor Luminance Sensitivity
http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/monitor_sensitivity.html
http://www.photofriday.com/calibrate.php

Monitor sharpness test
http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/sharpness.php

Lighting Your Workspace
http://www.creativepro.com/article/the-darkroom-makes-a-comeback
http://www.color-image.com/2012/02/monitor-calibration-d65-white-point-soft-proofing/

Display Calibration Hardware Capabilities
http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/Calibration/MonitorCalibrationHardware.html

Spyder4 vs i1Display Pro
http://www.gamutprints.com/2012/04/i1display-pro-vs-spyder-4-and-spyder-4-quick-review/

http://nativedigital.co.uk/site/2013/04/i1display-pro-vs-spyder4elite/

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