Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography

Started Jul 4, 2012 | Discussions
I Cant Believe Its Not Butter
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Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
Jul 4, 2012

I went to a local street fair this morning and was taking some pictures of some of the booths. One booth had a 'No Photography' sign at the bottom of the booth, but I took a picture anyway. I was not just taking a picture of his booth, but of others also.

Most people were nice about it. This one guy came over and yelled at me saying that I must delete the picture that I took. I then asked him to quote the law that I violated because I was on a public street.

He then cussed me out and told me to get lost. I just laughed and went on my merry way.

Why do these idiots think that they can control our rights to photography?

drh681
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

Well you were warned.

They can't keep you from makining photographs, but they absolutely can make it an unpleasant endevour; as you found.

Often these people are concerned with "copyright infringement" especially if they are some sort of art/crafts maker.
Or...
maybe the knuclehead was in a witness protection program.
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Craig Gillette
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

That's kind of like photographers placing watermarks across their images or enforcing their copyright when images are copied. Other artists also have the right to control the way their products are copied. Instead of supporting another artist, you just made photographers look hypocritical.

Think of it this way, if you had a booth and were selling prints, would you accept random photographers making copies of your prints? There is more than one set of laws out there.

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I Cant Believe Its Not Butter
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to Craig Gillette, Jul 5, 2012

Craig Gillette wrote:

That's kind of like photographers placing watermarks across their images or enforcing their copyright when images are copied. Other artists also have the right to control the way their products are copied. Instead of supporting another artist, you just made photographers look hypocritical.

Think of it this way, if you had a booth and were selling prints, would you accept random photographers making copies of your prints? There is more than one set of laws out there.

Of course I wouldn't want someone making copies of my prints and I see you point. I wasn't up close taking pictures of his products, but just taking a picture of the complete booth. I can see where he would be worried about it, but he came across as a jerk instead of asking politely.

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Deleted1929
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And you achieved what by doing this ?
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

Most people were nice about it.

Except you, I think.

This one guy came over and yelled at me saying that I must delete the picture that I took. I then asked him to quote the law that I violated because I was on a public street.

So someone expected you to not photograph them because they had a sign up saying "no photography", but you "struck a blow for freedom" ( check your ego at the entrance next time ) and did it anyway.

And he was angry because you ignored what he wanted and just did whatever made you happy.

And when he asked for you to delete that incredibly important snap, you said no.

Do the words "common courtesy" ring a bell ?

Ghandi would be so proud of you. Not.

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Doug J
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

I Cant Believe Its Not Butter wrote:

Craig Gillette wrote:

That's kind of like photographers placing watermarks across their images or enforcing their copyright when images are copied. Other artists also have the right to control the way their products are copied. Instead of supporting another artist, you just made photographers look hypocritical.

Think of it this way, if you had a booth and were selling prints, would you accept random photographers making copies of your prints? There is more than one set of laws out there.

Of course I wouldn't want someone making copies of my prints and I see you point. I wasn't up close taking pictures of his products, but just taking a picture of the complete booth. I can see where he would be worried about it, but he came across as a jerk instead of asking politely.

You chose to ignore his sign. You should have approached him and asked if you could take a snap or 2. I've rarely had issues when I approach and ask in situations like this.

The lack of politeness was on your side, not his.

Cheers,
Doug
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I Cant Believe Its Not Butter
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Re: And you achieved what by doing this ?
In reply to Deleted1929, Jul 5, 2012

sjgcit wrote:

Most people were nice about it.

Except you, I think.

This one guy came over and yelled at me saying that I must delete the picture that I took. I then asked him to quote the law that I violated because I was on a public street.

So someone expected you to not photograph them because they had a sign up saying "no photography", but you "struck a blow for freedom" ( check your ego at the entrance next time ) and did it anyway.

Maybe I would have deleted the picture if he had asked nicely. I didn't photograph "them", I took a photo of the booth he was in from a distance.

And he was angry because you ignored what he wanted and just did whatever made you happy.

He ordered me to delete the photo and was extremely rude. I'm sure in his eyes, I was rude by taking the picture, but it happened. If I told him that I had a rule that he couldn't walk on the sidewalk because I put up a sign, he would have told me to pound sand.

And when he asked for you to delete that incredibly important snap, you said no.

Read my above response as to why I said no.

Do the words "common courtesy" ring a bell ?

Sure it does, but it goes both ways.

Ghandi would be so proud of you. Not.

I guess it's a good thing that Ghadni wasn't there!

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StephenG

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I Cant Believe Its Not Butter
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to Doug J, Jul 5, 2012

Doug J wrote:

I Cant Believe Its Not Butter wrote:

Craig Gillette wrote:

That's kind of like photographers placing watermarks across their images or enforcing their copyright when images are copied. Other artists also have the right to control the way their products are copied. Instead of supporting another artist, you just made photographers look hypocritical.

Think of it this way, if you had a booth and were selling prints, would you accept random photographers making copies of your prints? There is more than one set of laws out there.

Of course I wouldn't want someone making copies of my prints and I see you point. I wasn't up close taking pictures of his products, but just taking a picture of the complete booth. I can see where he would be worried about it, but he came across as a jerk instead of asking politely.

You chose to ignore his sign. You should have approached him and asked if you could take a snap or 2. I've rarely had issues when I approach and ask in situations like this.

The lack of politeness was on your side, not his.

Cheers,
Doug

In hindsight, I guess it would have been a good idea, but I wasn't taking a picture of individual products, but of the complete booth, but if he had asked me in a nice tone, I would have been more accommodating to his wishes.

Next time, I will avoid the situation.

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Berghof
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if you sell prints out in the public eye then
In reply to Craig Gillette, Jul 5, 2012

if you sell prints out in the public eye and are paranoid about some guy with a camera copying your material then just maybe don't sell it out in the open market or cover partly the image just like watermarks are used on digital imaging,once you present any image ,audio, or pleasant taste or smell and people like it then people will come up with a way how to successfully copy the original,for instance the Chinese [greatest imitators but poor innovators ]are masters in that type of work, they will copy anything from a volkswagen ,an apple computer or latest missile given to our friend who sell it to the Commies in China , that definitely makes me more upset then some fellow with a camera outside a booth full of prints
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archiebald
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Re: if you sell prints out in the public eye then
In reply to Berghof, Jul 5, 2012

First point, where did the OP mention he was taking photos of prints? He mentioned "products".

Second point, I am not aware of any countyr where anyone has a right to erect or enforce a "no photography" sign unless you are standing on their private property. (excepting a military installation maybe)

The jerk on the booth should take a running jump. If he wants to bring his product out into a public location, then it is fair game. It's his choice and he has no right either morally or in law to insist on no photography.

I recommend that the OP goes back to the street fair with about 50 friends an mob shoots the guy and his products.

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Deleted1929
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Re: And you achieved what by doing this ?
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

The way to diffuse arguments is not to do what you did. Tit for tat doesn't work.

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StephenG

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Kenneth Sloan
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

He did ask politely (his sign). You decided to ignore his polite request, so he escalated to match your level of rudeness.

You may have been "in the right" - but you were still rude, and have no reason to complain about him yelling and screaming at you.
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Pimpleportrait
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to Kenneth Sloan, Jul 5, 2012

Just last weekend I went out to the markets. Walking down the street, I saw a Beagle Dog tethered to a tree, its ears lifting in the wind. I thought this was interesting so I positioned myself about 20 metres away, took out my bazooka lens and began shooting away each time the wind blew the little dog's ears.

Not two minutes into this, from the corner of my eye, I saw a woman, wearing a black apron and a black cafe style shirt, fast approaching me.

Lowering my "Professional" camera, I said to her, "Yes, can I help you" to which this cafe server girl replied, "Can I ask you to stop taking photos here. There are children here," to which I replied "This is a public space," to which she stormed off saying, "I'll check with my boss."

Honest to God, while I was photographing the Dog, I never did notice a child. I am now wondering, does anyone have a right to stop me, a photographer from going about my daily job?

Tomorrow, I will be holding my second public exhibition. There will be quite a crowd, amongst them, people who will happily be snapping away at my hard earned artistic photographic works and perhaps putting this up on facebook. Good luck to them, I have printed my work on glossy paper. They may as well take photos of mirrors.

Ben

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Graystar
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My take...
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

...is that the booth operator was wrong (and rude) for putting up a "no photography" sign in a place where people clearly have the right to photograph. We all get in an uproar when a cop tries to stop someone from taking pictures in a public place, but yet for some reason there are posters giving this guy a free pass at limiting our rights. I don't understand where this double standard comes from.

.

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tko
tko
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another opinion
In reply to I Cant Believe Its Not Butter, Jul 5, 2012

The guys in a public place. He's blocking the street. He made a choice to appear in public, conspicuously. He's trying to make money off the public, but putting rules and conditions on it.

Scr*w him. Putting up a stupid little sign doesn't give him any special rights. It doesn't give him the right to yell at people. And it doesn't give him the right to ask people to delete photos.

If he's a raving paranoid, stay out of public places, and don't do business with the public. Bet his little tantrum did his business a lot of good.

Tell you what. I'm going to put up a little sign stating all the condition you have to obey around me. Maybe make a t-shirt. No photography, no cell phones, no texting within 10-feet, no loud talking, no tattoos. Don't like it, I'll cuss you out. Because you're being rude by not following my rules, the ones I so clearly posted to the world.

I Cant Believe Its Not Butter wrote:

I went to a local street fair this morning and was taking some pictures of some of the booths. One booth had a 'No Photography' sign at the bottom of the booth, but I took a picture anyway. I was not just taking a picture of his booth, but of others also.

Most people were nice about it. This one guy came over and yelled at me saying that I must delete the picture that I took. I then asked him to quote the law that I violated because I was on a public street.

He then cussed me out and told me to get lost. I just laughed and went on my merry way.

Why do these idiots think that they can control our rights to photography?

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SteveJL
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Re: another opinion
In reply to tko, Jul 5, 2012

tko wrote:

Tell you what. I'm going to put up a little sign stating all the condition you have to obey around me. Maybe make a t-shirt. No photography, no cell phones, no texting within 10-feet, no loud talking, no tattoos. Don't like it, I'll cuss you out. Because you're being rude by not following my rules, the ones I so clearly posted to the world.

Great idea! Me Too!......but I think I'll add a "No punching me" to mine.....just in case, ya know? LOL

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aardvark7
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Re: Went to a local Street Fair - No Photography
In reply to Kenneth Sloan, Jul 5, 2012

As has been mentioned elsewhere, his sign was not 'polite'.

If he had written: 'Please do not photograph the booth', then it would have been a polite request, but 'NO PHOTOGRAPHS' is, in my opinion, extremely brusque.

Given that someone had decided to make such a sign, despite it being unenforceable, seems to suggest that they weren't likely to be very welcoming or accommodating.

That, in itself, would put the OP in a difficult position if his primary hobby, or job, is photography.

In hindsight, it may have been sensible to ask first, but would the reaction have been any more tolerant? I think a gentle, 'Sorry, I didn't mean to intrude or offend, but I just took a general shot of the bustling market scene. It's my hobby', would have worked best.

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osage_archer
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Re: My take...
In reply to Graystar, Jul 5, 2012

+1

Public space, no expectation of privacy, no right to demand or command people do as he wants them to. If he put up a sign saying "SILENCE! NO TALKING ALLOWED!" would people be obligated to obey it? Would people meekly obey the out-of-control cop who is beating the crap out of someone when he says "STOP RECORDING!" (maybe, unless you too want the crap beaten out of you) - I find it disheartening that not only are people more like sheep, but also that common courtesy seems to be disappearing - this situation perhaps could have been defused and handled better. There are already remedies under the law if any copyright laws are broken - do we just ignore the law now for a situation like this? If so, why?

Graystar wrote:

...is that the booth operator was wrong (and rude) for putting up a "no photography" sign in a place where people clearly have the right to photograph. We all get in an uproar when a cop tries to stop someone from taking pictures in a public place, but yet for some reason there are posters giving this guy a free pass at limiting our rights. I don't understand where this double standard comes from.

.

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ARShutterbug
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Just let them have their way with you
In reply to osage_archer, Jul 5, 2012

It's an attitude of letting people do stuff to you so that somehow you win by being abused. It doesn't work, and they know it. Give in to "no photos" demands, and next they'll decide to take other rights away to suit their own perverted desires. For example, I was involved in a verbal altercation with a driver who insisted that I wasn't allowed to drive on his street and demanded that I get away from his house. No, it's not your street because it doesn't belong to you! He used his vehicle to block me from leaving, and threatened me. He's lucky he didn't end up in jail.

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SteveS58
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Re: Just let them have their way with you
In reply to ARShutterbug, Jul 5, 2012

No doubt that photographing in public can be a confrontational activiity. Many pro photographers go by the rule of shoot first and answer questions later. I had a very uncomfortable run in with a lawyer type who demanded to know why I was photographing him in an outdoor drive in restaurant, even though I was 50 feet away.
He said his piece and stormed off like I had offended him in a grievous manner.

As others have suggested, I try to be polite when approached. I also carry a sample portfolio of 8.5 x 11's of my work with me in a backpack, with innocuos photos, in case anyone is curious about my intentions. When asked about what I do with my photos, I deflect the discussion by saying it's for a photography class assignment. When all else fails, just walk away rather than creating an incident.

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