Shutter release solution for Nikon P510

Started Jun 15, 2012 | Discussions
Raider70
Senior MemberPosts: 1,104
Like?
Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
Jun 15, 2012

I don't believe there is a Nikon remote cable release for the Nikon P510.

Anyone know if there is any remote shutter release available to capture a 'live' wildlife moment?

Or, is the only way to trigger the shutter is the timer on the camera?

I think I already know the answer to this question.

Thanks!

Skip

Nikon Coolpix P510
If you believe there are incorrect tags, please send us this post using our feedback form.
Denis247
Senior MemberPosts: 1,342Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Raider70, Jun 15, 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYhf1u1zs_s

Would this do it ?

Looks like it's only short range though (10m)

 Denis247's gear list:Denis247's gear list
Sony SLT-A55 Sony a77 II Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM Sony DT 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 ZA Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Sony 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Raider70
Senior MemberPosts: 1,104
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Denis247, Jun 15, 2012

I'll check it out. Thanks a lot for taking the time to help!

Skip

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Raider70
Senior MemberPosts: 1,104
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Denis247, Jun 16, 2012

I don't believe this would work because I think you have to depress the shutter half way for the focus to lock in. Just making the shutter snap without this step whould keep the camera from autofocusing.

Any further comments/suggestions would be appreciated.

Skip

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Michael Meissner
Forum ProPosts: 23,239Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Raider70, Jun 19, 2012

Raider70 wrote:

I don't believe this would work because I think you have to depress the shutter half way for the focus to lock in. Just making the shutter snap without this step whould keep the camera from autofocusing.

Any further comments/suggestions would be appreciated.

On many cameras if you mash the shutter down all the way without doing a 1/2 press of the shutter release, it will first focus and then take the shot. If that is the case, the remoteall would work. It might be that you need a particular setting to tell the camera to completely focus before taking the shot.

For instance, on my Olympus E-5, when I'm using live view mode instead of the optical view finder, the focus is kind of slow, and even if I have the setting to wait for a focus lock set, it sometimes shoots before it gets a complete focus lock.

If a wired control is sufficient, you can easily put together a housing to hold a film mechanical release. These come in two versions, one with a wire that runs all of the way through the cable and the other that uses a air tube and when you press the bellows it presses out a rod to take the picture. I made such a housing for my Olympus E-P2, that was in an enclosure where I couldn't use the normal wired shutter release with some wood, a drill, some glue, and a strip of hook & loop fabric (i.e. Velcro [tm]):

I've played around with recreating the remoteall with my Arduino and a hobby servo. I'm currently waiting for some parts for the servo to convert it into a straight up/down motion.

In doing a google, I noticed there is a site that seems to specialize talking about hacking cameras for use in trail photography ( http://www.diytrailcams.com ). You have to register and be approved by the moderators, so at present, I can't tell you if it is useful information or not.

 Michael Meissner's gear list:Michael Meissner's gear list
Olympus C-2100 UZ Olympus Tough TG-2 Olympus Stylus 1 Olympus E-5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 +19 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Denis247
Senior MemberPosts: 1,342Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Michael Meissner, Jun 19, 2012

Probably not with modern cameras that have an easy shutter release action, but on older film cameras back in the good 'ole days I played with solenoids for actuating the shutter, and found that a cam wheel mounted on a motor worked best. Solenoids, and perhaps you servo idea, just wouldn't provide the torque.

Indeed, Robot cameras had such a camwheel remote as an accessoriy.

And when I used a Konica slr which had a built in electric autowind, I made simple electronic triggers, working a relay with just one set of contacts, with the focus and shutter release wires commoned, and that seemed to focus first and the fire the shutter. I believe the camera knew what to do, ie focus then shoot.

And this device that I linked to is listed as being suitable for 'all' cameras, so you must be right assuming modern cameras will focus first before firing if the button is just mashed down all in one go.

Btw, that trials camera site you linked to looks interesting....

Michael Meissner wrote:

Raider70 wrote:

I don't believe this would work because I think you have to depress the shutter half way for the focus to lock in. Just making the shutter snap without this step whould keep the camera from autofocusing.

Any further comments/suggestions would be appreciated.

On many cameras if you mash the shutter down all the way without doing a 1/2 press of the shutter release, it will first focus and then take the shot. If that is the case, the remoteall would work. It might be that you need a particular setting to tell the camera to completely focus before taking the shot.

For instance, on my Olympus E-5, when I'm using live view mode instead of the optical view finder, the focus is kind of slow, and even if I have the setting to wait for a focus lock set, it sometimes shoots before it gets a complete focus lock.

If a wired control is sufficient, you can easily put together a housing to hold a film mechanical release. These come in two versions, one with a wire that runs all of the way through the cable and the other that uses a air tube and when you press the bellows it presses out a rod to take the picture. I made such a housing for my Olympus E-P2, that was in an enclosure where I couldn't use the normal wired shutter release with some wood, a drill, some glue, and a strip of hook & loop fabric (i.e. Velcro [tm]):

I've played around with recreating the remoteall with my Arduino and a hobby servo. I'm currently waiting for some parts for the servo to convert it into a straight up/down motion.

In doing a google, I noticed there is a site that seems to specialize talking about hacking cameras for use in trail photography ( http://www.diytrailcams.com ). You have to register and be approved by the moderators, so at present, I can't tell you if it is useful information or not.

 Denis247's gear list:Denis247's gear list
Sony SLT-A55 Sony a77 II Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM Sony DT 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 ZA Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Sony 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Michael Meissner
Forum ProPosts: 23,239Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Denis247, Jun 19, 2012

Denis247 wrote:

Probably not with modern cameras that have an easy shutter release action, but on older film cameras back in the good 'ole days I played with solenoids for actuating the shutter, and found that a cam wheel mounted on a motor worked best. Solenoids, and perhaps you servo idea, just wouldn't provide the torque.

The servo in this case is essentially a robot finger. Given you don't have to put tens of pounds of force to shoot with your camera, most hobby servos should be able to handle it. Obviously, you don't want so much force that it will break the camera, which is why when I'm playing with it, I'm using a camera I haven't shot with in 2 years, and not my current cameras.

I've played with the hobby servo that came with my Arduino kit, and it has enough torque to press down the button on my Olympus SP-550UZ. I'm currently waiting on some parts to convert the servo from a 180 degree sweep to pure in/out, and I need to properly mount the servo, so it doesn't move when doing the motion.

If you look at the ad for the remoteall, it is clear, that it is nothing but a microprocessor with an IR read sensor and a hobby servo.

If you are willing to open up the camera, and void the warranty, you will see that the average shutter is a fairly simple contraption. If it just fires, it will have 3 wires coming out of it, one is ground, one is the focus signal, and one is the fire signal. When you do a 1/2 press of the shutter, it connects the first two wires to make a circuit, and when you do a full press, it connects all 3 wires. Your average wired shutter release is the same thing.

Now, if the shutter has the wide angle and telephoto zoom attached, it will have 5 wires, with the extra two wires indicating that you are pressing the wide angle or telephoto options (and they would make a circuit with the common ground wire).

Indeed, Robot cameras had such a camwheel remote as an accessoriy.

And when I used a Konica slr which had a built in electric autowind, I made simple electronic triggers, working a relay with just one set of contacts, with the focus and shutter release wires commoned, and that seemed to focus first and the fire the shutter. I believe the camera knew what to do, ie focus then shoot.

And this device that I linked to is listed as being suitable for 'all' cameras, so you must be right assuming modern cameras will focus first before firing if the button is just mashed down all in one go.

Well as I said, there might be cases where the camera gives up and just shoots without achieving a focus lock in low light situations (like my E-5 example).

Btw, that trials camera site you linked to looks interesting....

Yep it does.

 Michael Meissner's gear list:Michael Meissner's gear list
Olympus C-2100 UZ Olympus Tough TG-2 Olympus Stylus 1 Olympus E-5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 +19 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Denis247
Senior MemberPosts: 1,342Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Michael Meissner, Jun 19, 2012

It's a whole lot easier in these days of electric shutters, as you said, they are just an electrical switch, the only torque needed is to overcome the spring return.

Mechanical shutters needed a harder press, hence the camwheel approach. They worked though, eventually.

Fun ain't it?

Btw, my timer and trip circuits I designed and built before the days of microprocessors. It was all logic then. Powered many a hold-up camera in those days ( better resolution than cctv then).

 Denis247's gear list:Denis247's gear list
Sony SLT-A55 Sony a77 II Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM Sony DT 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 ZA Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Sony 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Michael Meissner
Forum ProPosts: 23,239Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Denis247, Jun 19, 2012

Denis247 wrote:

It's a whole lot easier in these days of electric shutters, as you said, they are just an electrical switch, the only torque needed is to overcome the spring return.

Mechanical shutters needed a harder press, hence the camwheel approach. They worked though, eventually.

Fun ain't it?

And of course in 1878 when Eadweard Muybridge did his famous series of photographs that demonstrated that horses did have a period where all 4 feet are off of the ground that shutter mechanisms were even more phsyical, involving trip wires.

 Michael Meissner's gear list:Michael Meissner's gear list
Olympus C-2100 UZ Olympus Tough TG-2 Olympus Stylus 1 Olympus E-5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 +19 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Denis247
Senior MemberPosts: 1,342Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Michael Meissner, Jun 19, 2012

I bow to your knowledge, you're obviously a lot older than I.

Michael Meissner wrote:

Denis247 wrote:

It's a whole lot easier in these days of electric shutters, as you said, they are just an electrical switch, the only torque needed is to overcome the spring return.

Mechanical shutters needed a harder press, hence the camwheel approach. They worked though, eventually.

Fun ain't it?

And of course in 1878 when Eadweard Muybridge did his famous series of photographs that demonstrated that horses did have a period where all 4 feet are off of the ground that shutter mechanisms were even more phsyical, involving trip wires.

 Denis247's gear list:Denis247's gear list
Sony SLT-A55 Sony a77 II Sigma 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM Sony DT 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 ZA Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* Sony 70-400mm F4-5.6 G SSM +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Michael Meissner
Forum ProPosts: 23,239Gear list
Like?
Re: Shutter release solution for Nikon P510
In reply to Denis247, Jun 19, 2012

Denis247 wrote:

I bow to your knowledge, you're obviously a lot older than I.

Maybe I am, and maybe I'm not. The stuff about Eadweard Muybridge came from a lecture that an artist friend of mine gave about Eadweard a few weeks ago.

However, while I have three 4x5 and one 5x7 cameras lying about, I haven't actually run film through them. So your experience with the cams, etc. trumps mine, since what I've done shutter releases on have all been digital.

 Michael Meissner's gear list:Michael Meissner's gear list
Olympus C-2100 UZ Olympus Tough TG-2 Olympus Stylus 1 Olympus E-5 Olympus PEN E-PM2 +19 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads