Novice looking for feedback

Started Jun 13, 2012 | Discussions
jmcalgary
New MemberPosts: 4
Like?
Novice looking for feedback
Jun 13, 2012

i am pretty new to being out of automatic mode. I rented a canon EF 70-200 IS 2.8 and thought i would play with shutter speeds and a tripod. Any suggestions or feedback is greatly appreciated.

trekkeruss
Senior MemberPosts: 3,564
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

I'd either like to see them in portrait orientation mode, or with the subject to the left of center.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
leno
Senior MemberPosts: 1,075Gear list
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to trekkeruss, Jun 13, 2012

Technically I would say well done. The framing could be tighter but a little croping would sort that. I would try to get a lower angle due to the hight of the subjects. Their eye level is what I would go for.

 leno's gear list:leno's gear list
Olympus XZ-1 Nikon D5100 Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G +2 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
hotdog321
Veteran MemberPosts: 9,088
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

Exposure and focus is fine. I would say:

1. Shoot much tighter. Use that 200 and either shoot tight vertical full length or, ideally, even tighter horizontal waist up.

2. If you are going to shoot full length, watch the cropping (feet cut off in second shot.)

3. Work on timing. Eventually you will reliably get the shot just as the bat impacts (or misses) the ball.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
jmcalgary
New MemberPosts: 4
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to hotdog321, Jun 13, 2012

Great tips everyone, thanks so much. When you say work on the height are you suggesting no tripod? I found the 70-200 pretty heavy, but i guess i would get used to it.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Alvatrus
Regular MemberPosts: 429
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

Shooting with such a heavy lens, you need a monopod/tripod, or you'll risk blurriness.

Also, try a longer focal length, and a lower aperture: that results in a blurry background, thus creating separation between the subject and the background.

If it's a cloudy/overcast day, don't leave your gear at home!

Edit: I see now that you already are at f/2.8. I would have expected a shallower depth of field!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
hotdog321
Veteran MemberPosts: 9,088
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

Oh, yeah. I meant to point out that aspect. Do not use a tripod for baseball unless you are in the dugout or a media pit. It is a positive danger to runners, distracted coaches and yourself if you need to dodge a foul ball.

I've gotten used to the weight of a 70-200 f/2.8 slug around my neck, but if you find it difficult, use a monopod--not a tripod.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
motobloat
Regular MemberPosts: 497
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

These are nice and sharp shots - high shutter speed (1/3200!) and using a tripod certainly helped with that. Most people don't bother with a tripod, and then they wonder why their 300mm shots aren't sharp!

Also, if you had been using a Canon 70-300 f/4-5.6 L IS USM lens (about $800 cheaper than the 70-200 f/2.8) you would have had a shutter speed of about 1/800 @ f/5.6 to get the same exposure, and you'd have a bit more reach (300mm) and a lighter weight lens (2.3lb instead of 3.3lb). Unless you are shooting indoor sports, or sports that go farther into the evening than this one, (i.e. where there is less light available) you may consider that lens instead. At least rent one and see if you like it better.

The images are also well exposed and the timing is pretty good (subject is swinging the bat), which can be the most challenging aspect of sports photography.

My advice would be:

  • try to position your subject off center for a more interesting composition. usually a subject walking into a frame (or looking into a frame) creates a more harmonious composition than if they are at the edge of the frame looking/moving out of the frame.

  • many sports photos often benefit from a vertical (portrait) orientation, because the subjects are usually vertical. baseball, football, basketball, golf, volleyball, etc. other sports, you end up using a horizontal (landscape) orientation more. wrestling, many track and field events, etc. in some sports, like baseball, you end up using both.

  • if you have a gimball head on your tripod (like the acratech GP or something) where you can quickly switch between portrait and landscape, that will help you a lot

  • if you are shooting the whole person, try to get their whole body in the frame - in the second one you cropped off his feet. if you are shooting NOT the whole person, GET CLOSER so you can really see the action. for baseballers at bat, a lot of times you don't need to see the legs - a portrait orientation at the belt-line or so gets you a really nice shot of the action. for someone sliding into home, a landscape orientation with the full body included well inside the frame would probably work better. remember, you can always crop later, but you can't un-crop...

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ptl-2010
Regular MemberPosts: 274Gear list
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to motobloat, Jun 13, 2012

I agree with most here. give your subject some nose room, and pay careful attention to framing. Try both portrait and landscape orientation. A longer lens would certainly help if you're shooting outdoor sports from this distance often. You can get a 70-300 USM IS lens for about $400 and it will produce some pretty nice images, and it will weigh less. You will lose the shallow DOF though.
--
-Paul

 ptl-2010's gear list:ptl-2010's gear list
Canon PowerShot SX230 HS Canon EOS 450D Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II +1 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
hotdog321
Veteran MemberPosts: 9,088
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to hotdog321, Jun 13, 2012

Errrr--I meant to say "slung" around my neck, not slug. Snort!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Hank3152
Forum ProPosts: 12,426Gear list
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to jmcalgary, Jun 13, 2012

Several people commented on timing the shot which is difficult to master.......better off shooting in continuous drive set at Hi rather than single shot and use AI Servo for your AF.
--
Regards,
Hank

 Hank3152's gear list:Hank3152's gear list
Canon PowerShot S95 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS-1D Mark IV Canon EF 300mm f/4.0L IS USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM +5 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
RobG67
Contributing MemberPosts: 818Gear list
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to hotdog321, Jun 14, 2012

I can't speak for the Canon version, but my Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 isn't really that heavy, even when coupled with a D700; perfectly hand holdable. It's my favourite walk-around/general purpose/use it for (almost) eveything lens.

Maybe you guys need to go to the gym a couple of afternoons a week and lift some weights...

-- hide signature --

Rob.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
kgbruce01
Senior MemberPosts: 1,245
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to Hank3152, Jun 14, 2012

Hank3152 wrote:

Several people commented on timing the shot which is difficult to master.......better off shooting in continuous drive set at Hi rather than single shot and use AI Servo for your AF.

Really, is it 'better'? Or is it just 'easier'?

I would argue that it's 'better' to work on your timing and skills then constantly relying on spray and pray.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Hank3152
Forum ProPosts: 12,426Gear list
Like?
Re: Novice looking for feedback
In reply to kgbruce01, Jun 14, 2012

kgbruce01 wrote:

Hank3152 wrote:

Several people commented on timing the shot which is difficult to master.......better off shooting in continuous drive set at Hi rather than single shot and use AI Servo for your AF.

Really, is it 'better'? Or is it just 'easier'?

Both........if your body has a frame rate capability above 6fps.......

I would argue that it's 'better' to work on your timing and skills then constantly relying on spray and pray.

Isn't that why BIF and pro sport shooters prefer bodies like the 1DmkIV with 10fps?

Action in sports is becoming so fast that timing in most cases is near impossible especially when the unexpected occurs which no one anticipates
--
Regards,
Hank

 Hank3152's gear list:Hank3152's gear list
Canon PowerShot S95 Canon EOS 5D Mark II Canon EOS-1D Mark IV Canon EF 300mm f/4.0L IS USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM +5 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads