"Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo

Started May 21, 2012 | Discussions
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
"Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo
May 21, 2012

I currently own a set of Cactus V4 triggers (1 transmitter, 2 receivers). They seem to work fine and they aren't bad but I'm not terribly happy with their design. Im also getting sick of the unreliable line-of-sight IR shutter remote for my D7000.

So I decided to order two sets (4 total) of Aputure* TrigMaster Plus triggers (Nikon cable version) that are supposed to be able to act as radio shutter releases AND flash triggers, or both at the same time. So with 4 transcievers you get:

  • One is the handheld shutter remote transmitter

  • One on the camera for rx/tx flash triggering AND (with proper cable) shutter triggering

  • Two for actual strobe receivers

I looked at the latest Yongnuo triggers and the Cactus V5 and they seemed to be lacking one thing or another that I wanted.

Did I make the right decision? Opinions?

Yes, the company name is really spelled "Aputure" not aperture. This by itself is enough to make me instantly skeptical because it looks as though some company that's too cheap to hire an English translator to spell their company name properly decided to make some flash triggers. The reviews look good though so I decided to overlook this but still... seems like they need to fix their name because it might have caused me to skip over them altogether.

victorian squid
Senior MemberPosts: 1,937Gear list
Like?
I love the trigmasters
In reply to ComputerDork, May 21, 2012

and have had them for several months. They are well build, with a great feature set. Worth the extra price IMHO.

If there was one complaint it would be the configuration - you can't put one in the flash shoe of your camera and one on top (like Yongnuo). They're more like PW's in that regard. Then again, I've never had need to do that - I just like to complain!

The things come with every cable you could possibly want or need (for a Canon shooter) as I wasn't sure what model I would upgrade to.

The range is insane on the things. At first I though I'd never use it - but now I've found all kinds of things to do with them. I have had them at and over 100 yards (they're rated for 100M) and even stood on a hill with one behind a house.

One other complaint (as long as I'm trying to think one up) - is how snug they fit on the camera. It takes some "coaxing" to get off. I keep forgetting to try some dry graphite or something like that. I guess they had problems with the old design, and then changed to the clip layout. You might not have that issue - it's worse on my 60D than my 350D, and no problem at all on my light stand swivel.

Enjoy them, they're great!

BTW, the Trigmaster Plus 2.6 transceiver will trigger the 2.6 "receiver only" units if you want to use some just as receivers and save money.

 victorian squid's gear list:victorian squid's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM +27 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
The A-Team
Regular MemberPosts: 351
Like?
Re: "Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo
In reply to ComputerDork, May 21, 2012

Although I agree with you that 'Aputure' sounds silly, there are plenty of company names and products out there that are "misspellings" of actual words. Just think how ubiquitous our precious "speedlites" are. I also think naming a company "Aperture" is pretty strange, especially considering the software.

ComputerDork wrote:

Yes, the company name is really spelled "Aputure" not aperture. This by itself is enough to make me instantly skeptical because it looks as though some company that's too cheap to hire an English translator to spell their company name properly decided to make some flash triggers. The reviews look good though so I decided to overlook this but still... seems like they need to fix their name because it might have caused me to skip over them altogether.

-- hide signature --
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Suntan
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,117
Like?
Re: "Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo
In reply to ComputerDork, May 21, 2012

ComputerDork wrote:

I looked at the latest Yongnuo triggers and the Cactus V5 and they seemed to be lacking one thing or another that I wanted.

Just out of curiosity, what did you find lacking in the Yongnuo triggers?

-Suntan

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
victorian squid
Senior MemberPosts: 1,937Gear list
Like?
As an old marketing guy
In reply to The A-Team, May 22, 2012

I could probably guess that (aside from the possibility of twisted translation) this was an attempt to fuse 2 words as so often is the case in marketing. This would be "aperture + future" as one possibility. It never really bothered me too much at all.

For an example of really bad marketing + translation I can tell you about doing advertising for a company that came out with a frozen yogurt back in the early 90's from Japan. They thought they were really clever. Their product was called "FroGloo", fro for frozen, and gloo from igloo. WTF? We tried to get them to "frogurt" or something that made you think "tasty" instead of "school paste".

No, no they wouldn't listen.
And you can tell what a success it was!

 victorian squid's gear list:victorian squid's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM +27 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Sailor Blue
Senior MemberPosts: 6,109Gear list
Like?
Re: "Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo
In reply to ComputerDork, May 22, 2012

I have two Yongnuo RF-602 transmitters and six receivers - plenty of backup. I bought before the newer RF-603 became available. The receivers came with the LS-02/3.5 Connection cable. I added a LS-02/C3 Shutter Release Cable so I can use one of the receivers to remotely trigger my camera as well as fire my strobes.

The newer RF-603's are transceivers so you only need one type. They do NOT come with connection cables. You will need to buy the cables to connect the transceivers to your strobes and camera.

I have been very happy with the Yongnuo triggers. The only problem is that when the receiver batteries are nearly exhausted the trigger starts firing the attached strobe as fast as it can partially recharge. That is cured by simply replacing the batteries. I use Eneloop AAA batteries with no problems.

 Sailor Blue's gear list:Sailor Blue's gear list
Canon EOS 7D +10 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Suntan
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,117
Like?
Re: "Aputure" Trigmaster Plus vs. Cactus V5 vs Yongnuo
In reply to Sailor Blue, May 22, 2012

Sailor Blue wrote:

The newer RF-603's are transceivers so you only need one type. They do NOT come with connection cables. You will need to buy the cables to connect the transceivers to your strobes and camera.

The 603s can be bought in a kit that comes with two transceivers and a cable to trigger the camera shutter.

Amazon has them for most every configuration of Nikon and Canon camera.

-Suntan

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Aputure name
In reply to The A-Team, May 22, 2012

Sorry, not trying to pointlessly bash your company name, I was just mentioning my initial impression while stating that my initial impression was wrong. What ultimately matters is that the products are good, but when I told someone about the triggers and that they needed to search for "aputure" I got a bit of a skeptical reaction when I told them the spelling they should search for. I told them "just search for 'apUture' and see the reviews."

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Yongnuo trigger shortcomings
In reply to Suntan, May 22, 2012

Basically the things about the Yongnuo triggers that I didn't like and would keep them from working for me:

  • Most importantly: The transceivers try to auto-detect whether they should transmit or receive, and there would seem to be no sync input for transmit mode other than the hotshoe. This is a problem for me because I want to plug a transmitter into my light meter for "corded" flash metering mode. If this is possible it's not clear from the manual.

  • It sounds like the transceiver has to be in the hot shoe on the camera for the remote shutter release to work, if I can believe the manual. If this is necessary, I'm guessing it has to do with this autodetection stuff. I'd rather have manual control over tx, rx, or tx/rx mode as I don't know how these things are autodetecting or what they'll do in various situations.

  • The output sync connector is a PC connector and I'd rather have a 3.5mm connector since that would work better with the sync cables I have right now.

  • Not coming with any sync cables is a problem for me and not a good product decision on their part. They seem to assume that you should always be able to place a flash in the hotshoe when this is obviously not the case all the time. Generally I'd rather not do this in a light stand even if I can.

  • It sounds like the actual Yongnuo transceiver units differ for Canon and Nikon. Not sure why. The Trigmaster Plus units seem to be the same and only the shutter release cable differs by camera model.

  • Aputure's manual is better designed, the English is better though not perfect, and it describes the specific types of scenarios that I'm concerned about. (For example, it shows the trigger plugged into a hasselblad or something with no hotshoe, suggesting that "sync in" from cameras and light meters should work.) The quality of the English is just important because it shows more effort and inspires more confidence, and reduces the chance of misunderstanding the docs. Yongnuo's manual has not only rather bad English, but the manual is just plain designed poorly in terms of diagrams, organization, etc, in any language. Normally I don't care about the manual, but Aputure certainly gives the impression that they know more about what they're doing, and if somehow the Yongnuo triggers can even do what i want (triiggering by a light meter or anything with no output hotshoe) then I'd never be able to tell from the manual. It still isn't clear to me if the youngnuo transceiver has to be in the camera hot shoe to be used as a shutter release.

So in short, the Aputure Trigmaster Plus units seem like they should do what I want, and Aputure clearly expresses in the manual that they'll do what I need. The Yongnuos dont seem to do what I need, don't come with cables that this type of product is expected to come with, and the manual is so bad and lacking in detail that some things about how their triggers work are totally unclear.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Quicksilver
Contributing MemberPosts: 569
Like?
Not sure about Trigmaster or Cactus but YN 603s work well so far
In reply to Suntan, May 22, 2012

Are you using the Trigmasters you recently ordered? (YES)

Do they work? (YES)

Any problems so far? (NO)

If that sums up your experience, I think you are getting what you needed from them and that you made a good choice.

FWIW, I just got a set of YN 603s for my Canon G10 and they were inexpensive as far as radio triggers go. Well-built. Seem to work ok so far. Still playing with them.

I'll be honest, I never looked at the manual at all. Put the batteries in, put one on the camera and one with the speedlite, turned everything on and started snapping away. Wish everything was that easy! LOL

Biggest knock against them so far is lack of locking mechanism to keep a large speedlite securely mounted . Better for studio use than on a flash bracket for candid photography if you have to move around a lot.

Also wish they had drilled out a place in the bottom so you could easily attach them to a lightstand or tripod, etc.

Just ordered a set for my Nikon D300 and can't wait to try them out with it.

As mentioned before, they ship as 2 transceivers and a sync cord. The cord doesn't really go with the G10, but prob works with the higher end Canon DSLRs.

Haven't tried using a transceiver as a remote shutter release, will have to give it a shot.

Seem to be good value so far. Hope the Trigmasters are working well for you. Be interested in your experience with them.

DL

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Suntan
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,117
Like?
Re: Yongnuo trigger shortcomings
In reply to ComputerDork, May 22, 2012

Fair enough. I’d not heard of Aputure prior to your post. Let us know how they work out when you get some time with them.

Don’t take my comments below as rebuttals, but more just for general info in case someone else is pondering all their choices in low-cost RF triggers. As you said, the documentation that these Chinese companies give leaves a lot to be desired.

ComputerDork wrote:

Basically the things about the Yongnuo triggers that I didn't like and would keep them from working for me:

  • Most importantly: The transceivers try to auto-detect whether they should transmit or receive, and there would seem to be no sync input for transmit mode other than the hotshoe. This is a problem for me because I want to plug a transmitter into my light meter for "corded" flash metering mode. If this is possible it's not clear from the manual.

  • It sounds like the transceiver has to be in the hot shoe on the camera for the remote shutter release to work, if I can believe the manual. If this is necessary, I'm guessing it has to do with this autodetection stuff. I'd rather have manual control over tx, rx, or tx/rx mode as I don't know how these things are autodetecting or what they'll do in various situations.

In my experience, as long as one of the triggers is put into the hotshoe of the camera, any of the other triggers in range will trip all the other triggers. Whether it is a spare trigger in your hand or one already hooked to one of your lights. They will all trigger whenever one of the buttons is pressed.

As for hooking up a lightmeter, I don’t know if that is possible. I would agree that hooking up a 3rd party hotshoe-adapter type of cable would be too janky.

  • The output sync connector is a PC connector and I'd rather have a 3.5mm connector since that would work better with the sync cables I have right now.

I’d agree that a 3.5mm sync output would be better than PC. I wish PC connectors would have died decades ago. That said, there are a couple of good, screw-lock PC to 3.5mm connectors available on Ebay for about $5 or $6. For attaching to a monolight, they work well with the 603s.

  • Not coming with any sync cables is a problem for me and not a good product decision on their part. They seem to assume that you should always be able to place a flash in the hotshoe when this is obviously not the case all the time. Generally I'd rather not do this in a light stand even if I can.

I don’t know. For about $15 a trigger, there isn’t a lot of cost in there to include a bunch of cables. What sync cables should they include? Just a 3.5mm cable, or a PC cable, or others?

  • It sounds like the actual Yongnuo transceiver units differ for Canon and Nikon. Not sure why. The Trigmaster Plus units seem to be the same and only the shutter release cable differs by camera model.

I’m guessing it is the pinout on the hotshoe for allowing iTTL/ETTL passthrough. I know the iTTL doesn’t pass through, but I’m not sure about ETTL. In any case, I’d be interested to know if the two brands could be used interchangeably. I bet they would, at least for the triggering of flashes. Maybe not triggering the shutter.

  • Aputure's manual is better designed, the English is better though not perfect, and it describes the specific types of scenarios that I'm concerned about. (For example, it shows the trigger plugged into a hasselblad or something with no hotshoe, suggesting that "sync in" from cameras and light meters should work.) The quality of the English is just important because it shows more effort and inspires more confidence, and reduces the chance of misunderstanding the docs. Yongnuo's manual has not only rather bad English, but the manual is just plain designed poorly in terms of diagrams, organization, etc, in any language. Normally I don't care about the manual, but Aputure certainly gives the impression that they know more about what they're doing, and if somehow the Yongnuo triggers can even do what i want (triiggering by a light meter or anything with no output hotshoe) then I'd never be able to tell from the manual. It still isn't clear to me if the youngnuo transceiver has to be in the camera hot shoe to be used as a shutter release.

As far as I know, yes the trigger needs to be in the camera hotshoe to be the master and to trigger the camera shutter.

So in short, the Aputure Trigmaster Plus units seem like they should do what I want, and Aputure clearly expresses in the manual that they'll do what I need. The Yongnuos dont seem to do what I need, don't come with cables that this type of product is expected to come with, and the manual is so bad and lacking in detail that some things about how their triggers work are totally unclear.

-Suntan

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Suntan
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,117
Like?
One question
In reply to Suntan, May 22, 2012

Do the Trigmasters have a 1/4-20 tapped hole in the bottom for directly screwing to a lightstand?

The picture on Amazon doesn't show the bottom side.

-Suntan

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Re: Yongnuo trigger shortcomings
In reply to Suntan, May 23, 2012

Suntan wrote:

In my experience, as long as one of the triggers is put into the hotshoe of the camera, any of the other triggers in range will trip all the other triggers. Whether it is a spare trigger in your hand or one already hooked to one of your lights. They will all trigger whenever one of the buttons is pressed.

As for hooking up a lightmeter, I don’t know if that is possible. I would agree that hooking up a 3rd party hotshoe-adapter type of cable would be too janky.

Thanks for that info. Someone out there searching for info will find that useful.

  • The output sync connector is a PC connector and I'd rather have a 3.5mm connector since that would work better with the sync cables I have right now.

Actually, I thought the Trigmasters had 3.5mm connectors but they actually have 2.5mm connectors. Not a big deal since they came with both PC and 3.5mm cables, but I think 2.5mm cables are less common.

I don’t know. For about $15 a trigger, there isn’t a lot of cost in there to include a bunch of cables. What sync cables should they include? Just a 3.5mm cable, or a PC cable, or others?

That's a good point. The Yongnuos are like $33 for a set whereas Trigmsters are $60. So the Yongnuos make more sense when you don't need the cables and aren't worried about the tx/rx mode or ability to hook up a light meter.

  • It sounds like the actual Yongnuo transceiver units differ for Canon and Nikon. Not sure why. The Trigmaster Plus units seem to be the same and only the shutter release cable differs by camera model.

I’m guessing it is the pinout on the hotshoe for allowing iTTL/ETTL passthrough. I know the iTTL doesn’t pass through, but I’m not sure about ETTL. In any case, I’d be interested to know if the two brands could be used interchangeably. I bet they would, at least for the triggering of flashes. Maybe not triggering the shutter.

I don't think different brands are likely to be compatible but it seems like different models within the same brand often are.

Actually I'm not sure if the Trigmaster transcievers are all the same. Mine came with cables for both the 10-pin connector on the "pro" cameras and the rectangular "GPS" connector on the D7000, but the transcievers themselves have a little "for nikon" sticker on them. So perhaps it's not just the cables that differ.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Light stand screw
In reply to Suntan, May 23, 2012

Yes, they have a tapped brass fitting that's the same as the tripod mount hole on the bottom of cameras. I just screwed a light stand fitting into one to make sure it's the same. Only problem for me is that my umbrella holding brackets have only a cold shoe clamp and not the 1/4-20 stud. So I'll probably just hang them off the side for now.

I haven't had time to fully mess with them, but I turned all four of them on earlier, plugged one into my camera, and it worked nicely as a shutter release both for "half press" and bulb exposures. (It seems to lock open if held for more than 2 seconds or so.) Didn't plug in strobes yet but the LEDs on all four flash when the trigger goes off. They'll get full real-world use on Thursday.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
The A-Team
Regular MemberPosts: 351
Like?
Re: Yongnuo trigger shortcomings
In reply to ComputerDork, May 23, 2012

The only difference besides the cables are the hot-shoe connection pins, which are used to assist in waking up various branded flashes.

ComputerDork wrote:

Actually I'm not sure if the Trigmaster transcievers are all the same. Mine came with cables for both the 10-pin connector on the "pro" cameras and the rectangular "GPS" connector on the D7000, but the transcievers themselves have a little "for nikon" sticker on them. So perhaps it's not just the cables that differ.

-- hide signature --
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Aputure camera brand differences
In reply to The A-Team, May 24, 2012

So basically if you use the "for canon" unit on a Nikon with the proper Nikon cable, it will work as a shutter release. But if you put an auto sleep capable flash on any of the receivers then they won't wake from sleep when the camera becomes active due to a half-press etc? However if they aren't asleep for whatever reason then they still fire normally by the receivers when triggered?

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
The A-Team
Regular MemberPosts: 351
Like?
Re: Aputure camera brand differences
In reply to ComputerDork, May 25, 2012

That's correct, all receivers will work with all flashes, but only those specified for their brand will be able to wake up the same brand of flash.

ComputerDork wrote:

So basically if you use the "for canon" unit on a Nikon with the proper Nikon cable, it will work as a shutter release. But if you put an auto sleep capable flash on any of the receivers then they won't wake from sleep when the camera becomes active due to a half-press etc? However if they aren't asleep for whatever reason then they still fire normally by the receivers when triggered?

-- hide signature --
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Aputure TrigMaster Plus: bad PC cables in 4 units
In reply to The A-Team, May 26, 2012

I got my Trigmaster Plus transceiver units and tested them pretty extensively. Everything seems to work fine except that the included 2.5mm to PC cables included in all four boxes don't fit properly in their own transceiver's connectors. Using those cables the transceivers only trigger half the time or less.

After extensive testing with the 2.5mm-> 3.5mm cables I found no problems with them, and I noticed that the 2.5mm connectors on the PC cables didn't seem to fit very tightly. I also tested with all the transceivers and different devices with the PC sync output, so I'm sure there's nothing wrong with the transceivers or anything else, just the cables. The PC connectors on their cables fit very tightly in both devices so I'm pretty sure the problem is not with their PC connectors, just the out-of-spec 2.5mm connectors on their PC cables.

I measured the apparently defective connectors and found that they were more like 2mm wide (maybe even a hair less) and 12mm long while the working connectors seem to be 2.5mm (or very close to it) wide and 10mm long. Sure enough, if I pulled one of the defective male connectors out of the transceiver by about 2mm then the rate of successful triggerings became much more reliable.

Since four different cables included in four different boxes failed to work properly with four different transceivers, I'm sure this isn't a random defect. It seems that Aputure bought a bad batch of 2.5mm-> PC sync cables from some supplier and sent them out without testing them. Not sure I'd call that a design problem, but maybe a problem with their Quality Assurance process. (I have to admit it seems pretty nature to assume that when you buy 2.5mm connectors from a supplier, they're going to be 2.5mm instead of 2mm or 1.8mm.)

Anyway, I sent email using their support form on their web site, though I'm not sure the form worked so I also mailed sales@aputure.com to make sure. Hopefully they'll just send me new cables with properly manufactured connectors.

Other than this cable issue, which many people probably won't notice as it seems like the use of PC connectors is becoming less common, the triggers are pretty good. They trigger the shutter just fine and the transmitter seems to be pretty reliable about triggering the receivers when it does have a good connection to it's sync signal source. So they seem like good products that just got a bad batch of cables included with them due to some bad supplier and a QA oversight.

Only things that I wish were different about them:

  • The main button on the transceivers doesn't just test the flash when pressed by itself when the transceiver is in TX/RX mode. (In RX mode it triggers only it's own connected flash which is the right thing to do I think.) You can send a test flash trigger signal, but you have to hold the main button down halfway ("autofocus" position) and press the channel switching button. This isn't totally unreasonable though because when in TX/RX mode pressing the big button means "shutter release" and it would be impossible to distinguish between shutter release and "test flash" in TX/RX mode. Normally having to hold down this awkward combination of buttons to trigger the flash manually isn't so bad, but it could be annoying in some situations that involve frequently firing flashes manually (such as multiflash exposires or a flash at some point during a long exposure). A better solution would probably be to have seperate RX, TX, and "TX/RX" modes.

  • The 1/4-20 hole on the bottom is good but I wish it had a cold shoe on it too. Unfortunately my umbrella holders don't have a way to provide a 1/4-20 post (only a cold shoe) so i'd need a cold shoe adapter to use the hole with my deficient umbrella holders. I'd say this is really more of a problem with the umbrella brackets and that cold shoes on the transceivers along with the hole would just be a nice feature to have.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
victorian squid
Senior MemberPosts: 1,937Gear list
Like?
Re: Aputure TrigMaster Plus: bad PC cables in 4 units
In reply to ComputerDork, May 26, 2012

That's too bad about your cable - my PC cable is all fine and gets used frequently. That really was one of the selling points, so I hope they sort it out quickly!

Most of your observations are the ones that most people complain about (2 button test) and placement of hot shoe/cold shoe (or no shoe in this case!). I think they concentrated more on copying PW than coming up with some original ideas on their own.

Another minor annoyance is that since there's no cold shoe on the bottom, it would be nice if the bottom was flat (instead of curved), so it could be set on a solid surface with a flash on it.

I think your idea about a 3 position switch is a good one, the test fire still makes me crazy as I always have something else in one of my hands. Since they make such a nice big trigger button it would be nice to maximize its usefulness!

 victorian squid's gear list:victorian squid's gear list
Canon EOS 60D Canon EOS 6D Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM +27 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
ComputerDork
Regular MemberPosts: 225
Like?
Re: Aputure TrigMaster Plus: bad PC cables in 4 units
In reply to victorian squid, May 27, 2012

If you measure the 2.5mm connector on your PC cable, or compare it to the 2.5mm connectors on the other types of cables, is it the same size or is it thinner? When did you buy your triggers?

For the test button thing, I tried taping down the shutter button halfway but this doesn't work that well and it looks like it probably causes the transmitter to drain battery power as long as it's held down in a half press. So that doesn't exactly work too well.

From what I can tell though, a sync port on a camera just goes to a switch inside the camera that's either open or closed. On older mechanical cameras that's all it is. On newer electronic ones the "switch" is a transistor gated circuit (that can be fried if an older flash with some sort of 100V+ trigger voltage tries to blast current throught it). So it seems that it should be possible to just wire a 2.5mm connector to a pushbutton, stick it in the "PC Sync" (the "from camera" rather than "to flash" port), and have your own manual flash triggering button for the transmitter. I can't find any schematics for flash sync circuits so far, so I'm not entirely sure if this is true. So don't just take my word for ir, verify it somehow before doing anything like this.

As for the hot shoe, I've seen adapters for sale for $20/ea which seems too steep. (I could buy new umbrella holding flash brackets for that.) So I ordered this set of 5 annodized aluminum cold shoe adapters from an ebay vendor:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200686194209

Seems that on eBay these things sell for between $2-3 each. The ones with two nuts on them were only a few cents more (ea) than the lower quality ones with only one smaller nut, so I bought the better ones. I figure that aluminum ought to be sufficient for supporting the rather light flashes I have.

As with anything on ebay though, buy from some vendor that ships from within your own country or you'll be waiting a lot longer for your item, at best.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads