NP-50 vs NP-50A batteries for Fuji 660EXR vs 550EXR

Started May 15, 2012 | Discussions
aniramca
Regular MemberPosts: 179
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NP-50 vs NP-50A batteries for Fuji 660EXR vs 550EXR
May 15, 2012

The older version of Fuji 550EXR point and shoot is using NP-50 battery, and this is similar to Fuji X10.

Initially, I was under the impression that the newer version Fuji 660EXR is using the same battery... but surprised to see that it needs an NP-50A battery.

When I visited Fuji official website under batteries, it indicated that NP-50 can be used for almost all Fuji point and shoot EXR cameras (including F550, 660, 770), as well as Fuji X10.

Anyone has experience of using both NP-50 and NP-50A interchangeably? The NP50 indicates 3.6V typ 1000mAh (whatever that means?). The NP-50A indicates 3.7V
Should I ignore and use my new F660EXR battery with my X10?
Thanks for info and discussion

Kim Letkeman
Forum ProPosts: 33,105Gear list
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Re: NP-50 vs NP-50A batteries for Fuji 660EXR vs 550EXR
In reply to aniramca, May 15, 2012

aniramca wrote:

Anyone has experience of using both NP-50 and NP-50A interchangeably? The NP50 indicates 3.6V typ 1000mAh (whatever that means?). The NP-50A indicates 3.7V

The F770EXR came with an NP50A and I shot whatever battery was charged in it. When I took it to Stockholm I carried 3 NP50s, two of which were cheap knock offs, and there were no problems at all. The camera performed flawlessly. I sent the NP50A back to Fuji with the camera and don't miss it at all. I see no real difference in performance.

 Kim Letkeman's gear list:Kim Letkeman's gear list
Nikon Coolpix 990 Fujifilm FinePix F200EXR Fujifilm FinePix F770EXR Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF3 +16 more
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Billx08
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NP-50 and NP-50A batteries all same same
In reply to aniramca, May 15, 2012

aniramca wrote:

The older version of Fuji 550EXR point and shoot is using NP-50 battery, and this is similar to Fuji X10.

Initially, I was under the impression that the newer version Fuji 660EXR is using the same battery... but surprised to see that it needs an NP-50A battery.

No, that's not correct. Neither the F660EXR nor the F770EXR " need " to use an NP-50A battery. That's simply the label that Fuji is putting on those batteries that it includes with some if its current model cameras. If you want to buy another battery for the F660, the F770 or the X10, you can only buy the NP-50, which by the way, now has on its label the same 3.7v rating as the NP-50A. Actually, as long as they're close, the voltage doesn't matter. Even Li-Ion batteries have voltage drops as they go from fully charged to depleted, so the cameras that they're used in are designed to operate over a fairly wide voltage range, not at a single voltage. The capacity is much more significant, and all that tells you is that a battery with a higher mAh rating will probably (but not necessarily) provide more shots per charge. Here's the NP-50 with its new label.

When I visited Fuji official website under batteries, it indicated that NP-50 can be used for almost all Fuji point and shoot EXR cameras (including F550, 660, 770), as well as Fuji X10.

That's correct, but unless Fuji changed things very recently, the X10 still ships with the same old NP-50 battery, which is described in the X10 manual as well as in the "What's in the Box" description on B&H's X10 web page.

Anyone has experience of using both NP-50 and NP-50A interchangeably? The NP50 indicates 3.6V typ 1000mAh (whatever that means?). The NP-50A indicates 3.7V
Should I ignore and use my new F660EXR battery with my X10?

Yes. Ignore it, not only because both batteries will work perfectly well in any camera that will accept them, there may not even be any physical difference between them. The voltage rating is not fixed in stone. It's determined by the way batteries are tested, and if the old NP-50 was tested powering a very low drain device, such as an MP3 player or a clock, it might have a voltage rating of 3.8 or 3.9 volts. I posted a photo of some of my NP-50 type batteries earlier today in another thread, and it shows real Fuji NP-50 batteries as well as compatibles such as some from Pearstone, MAX, the KLIC-7004 (made by Kodak and seen in the upper left corner of the photo below), and others. I use them interchangeably in cameras such as the F600, F550, F300, F70, etc, and they all work just fine. Here's the latest word from a recent Fujifilm FAQ :

ID: 110200701
    Mar 19, 2012

Q. I want to purchase a rechargeable battery NP-50A.

A. The lithium ion rechargeable battery NP-50A is not commercially available.
    If a spare battery is necessary, please purchase an NP-50.

http://faq.fujifilm.com/digitalcamera/faq_detail.html?id=110200701

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aniramca
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Re: NP-50 and NP-50A batteries all same same
In reply to Billx08, May 16, 2012

Thanks for the reply. One of the reason that I just got an F660EXR (another Fuji camera) is for my daughter who plan to use it while traveling. I have 2 NP-50 batteries for my X10, and therefore I can lend one to her.

I was afraid that for different battery voltages used in the old film cameras, it could "fry" the camera.

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Billx08
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Re: NP-50 and NP-50A batteries all same same
In reply to aniramca, May 16, 2012

aniramca wrote:

Thanks for the reply. One of the reason that I just got an F660EXR (another Fuji camera) is for my daughter who plan to use it while traveling. I have 2 NP-50 batteries for my X10, and therefore I can lend one to her.

I was afraid that for different battery voltages used in the old film cameras, it could "fry" the camera.

There's nothing to worry about with the different NP-50 batteries. I suspect that the 3.7v and 3.6v rated batteries are substantially the same. Below is a chart showing the voltage discharge curves for several types of rechargeable batteries. The Li-Ion battery curve is the topmost, and you can see that from fully charged to flat, the voltage varies from about 4.0 to 3.0 volts. During most of the time that it's used, it will be delivering from about 3.8 to 3.4 volts. If the camera's voltage checking circuit was designed to power the camera down 3.5 volts, it would be wasting 20% of the battery's capacity. Shutting down at 3.4 volts will allow the camera to use about 90% of the capacity. It's not safe to go below that or you'd risk losing or corruption data on memory cards, because at the end, the voltage can plunge very rapidly, unlike alkaline batteries whose voltages drop continuously at a pretty steady rate. The URL for the small PDF document the chart came from is listed below. FWIW, "SLA" stands for Sealed Lead Acid and "RAM" for Rechargeable Alkaline-Manganese.

http://www1.electusdistribution.com.au/images_uploaded/recharge.pdf

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