The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem

Started Apr 23, 2012 | Discussions
TZ Photo
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The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
Apr 23, 2012

I've had the D7000 for over a year now and I must say I don't know what to think about this camera. I use it along my D3, it serves me in situations when the D3 is too loud in theatrical environment. I want to like this camera, I'm very impressed by it's built quality, all the buttons and wheels' tactile quality, I also think it's very responsive, no complaint in this regards. But I can't come to terms with it's AF, light metering, tonality of the photos, noise and back LCD color. I don't want to complaint for complaint's sake but to make sure I did all my best to fine tune my camera.

Despite using micro adjustment I'm still not getting satisfactory number of keepers with my 80-200/2,8D, Tokina 28-70/2,8 and 16-85 which I use mostly wth this camera. Focus is unreliable. I work mainly in M mode but when I use A or P, the metering is also not much dependable. What I really don't understand is that I can't get good color and tonality of my photos, Despite using custom settings the color and tonality of the files is nowhere near what I get from my D3. The back LCD also doesn't help. I thought it should be the same as in my D3, but it isn't. I can't depend on it when judging brightness and color. Do you know it the technologies are different for those both screens? I'm an avid long time user of capture NX, I know how to fine tune my settings in this programm, but I don't like what I get from this camera and I really like Capture NX2 and use it always in my workflow. Another thing is that I can get very noticeably better sharpness through NX2 than jpg straight from the camera. Luckily I always shoot NEF+ jpg.

So, to you who also know well the D3 camera, are your experiences similar to mine?

The last thing is: yesterday I was shooting a concert next to a Canon photographer. I don't know which camera he had, but his silent mode was much more silent than mine and in live view his camera was almost completely silent unlike mine. I know Canon users have their own problems but it's a pity I can't get a good silent low light camera from Nikon. I have already both so many of them: D100, D70, D70s, D200, D90 - I must say that the D7000 is a really mixed bag. Fortunately I love what the D3 gives me. I only can't use it in concerts, only during reheasals.

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Mako2011
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Edit
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

TZ Photo wrote:

Despite using micro adjustment I'm still not getting satisfactory number of keepers with my 80-200/2,8D, Tokina 28-70/2,8 and 16-85 which I use mostly wth this camera.

Have you taken steps to determine if the lenses or the camera body needs to be calibrated again at the service center. Folks who have done this are often amazed at the outcome and kick them selves for not doing it sooner

Focus is unreliable.

How so? What AF modes do you most use? Do you change AF-Area modes based on subject/situation or have one you stick with? Under what lighting do you most often shoot? I ask as it helps determine if a trip to Nikon service might solve your problem. I also find my D7K AF to be superior to any other Nikon in this class. Are you simply comparing to the D3 only? If so, you will be disappointing until you replace your D7000 with a D4.

I work mainly in M mode but when I use A or P, the metering is also not much dependable. What I really don't understand is that I can't get good color and tonality of my photos,

Many have found the metering system to be a big step up from previous Nikon's in this class. Do you change metering modes to fit the subject or do you rely on Matrix and not use compensation when required of the scene? Example photos from other D7K users seem to have really nice color and tonality. Do you shoot Raw? Are you using ADL? Again, trying to get a little more info to be steer you towards a possible solution.

Despite using custom settings the color and tonality of the files is nowhere near what I get from my D3. The back LCD also doesn't help. I thought it should be the same as in my D3, but it isn't.

That may be a major part of the dissatisfaction you feel. The D7K is not a D3. Many have voiced your same concerns when trying to compare there D7K to their older D40 or Fuji camera, and come away with similar conclusions. Flicker though suggests that, by and large, these aren't universal concerns.

I can't depend on it when judging brightness and color. Do you know it the technologies are different for those both screens?

The hardware is indeed different. You could actually calibrate you computer monitor to the imbedded JPG sRGB pic of the D7K LCD but I would not recommend that as it is not a true representation of the RAW file. If you shoot LV there will also be exposure differences from OVF shooting.

I'm an avid long time user of capture NX, I know how to fine tune my settings in this programm, but I don't like what I get from this camera and I really like Capture NX2 and use it always in my workflow. Another thing is that I can get very noticeably better sharpness through NX2 than jpg straight from the camera. Luckily I always shoot NEF+ jpg.

Of course they will differ depending on what Picture Control or custom setting you use. I start with zero sharpening and then apply that as a last step in PP. On another note, be sure your graphic drivers, software, and OS are updated. I had a significant loss of quality due to out date drivers. The files were fine but just displayed wrong by ViewNX2/CaptureNX2

The last thing is: yesterday I was shooting a concert next to a Canon photographer. I don't know which camera he had, but his silent mode was much more silent than mine and in live view his camera was almost completely silent unlike mine. I know Canon users have their own problems but it's a pity I can't get a good silent low light camera from Nikon.

Did you engage quite mode?

Bottom line, you should be able to easily get the same results shooting this picture in terms of focus, metering, and color. All are 100% crops of a curved bill with the seal being the focus point at near minimum focus distance (2600K lighting and no flash....hand held). If you cannot get similar results easily, perhaps you need to send the body or lens back in for service. Good luck and lets us know how it turns out.

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joao salvador
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

I totally relate to your experience. Just that instead of a D3 I have a D300s and a D700. My original intention was to get the 7000 as a smaller, lighter and better IQ replacement for the D300s. However, during the first few months I had so many problems in adapting to the AF performance of the D7000 that I never sold the 300s.

When I pick the 300s (and the same happens with the 700), the focus is perfect 99% of times, with any lens and no micro-adjustements and the exposure is allways predictable. Not so with the D7000: even with micro-adjustments my keeper rate is much lower and sometimes I simply cannot get the camera to meter certain scenes correctly.

I am sure that if I could or wanted to take the time, each picture, to pay attention to the D7000 particularities, the performance would be better. But why should I do it when another camera, the 300s, performs beautifully at all levels without any added effort?

Anyway, I'm glad I kept the 300s. After six months, I'm selling the D7000 and will wait for its replacement.

Regards
Joao

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Mako2011
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Doing the same thing
In reply to joao salvador, Apr 23, 2012

joao salvador wrote:

I totally relate to your experience. Just that instead of a D3 I have a D300s and a D700. My original intention was to get the 7000 as a smaller, lighter and better IQ replacement for the D300s. However, during the first few months I had so many problems in adapting to the AF performance of the D7000 that I never sold the 300s.

When I pick the 300s (and the same happens with the 700), the focus is perfect 99% of times, with any lens and no micro-adjustements and the exposure is allways predictable. Not so with the D7000: even with micro-adjustments my keeper rate is much lower and sometimes I simply cannot get the camera to meter certain scenes correctly.

I am sure that if I could or wanted to take the time, each picture, to pay attention to the D7000 particularities, the performance would be better. But why should I do it when another camera, the 300s, performs beautifully at all levels without any added effort?

Anyway, I'm glad I kept the 300s. After six months, I'm selling the D7000 and will wait for its replacement.

Your experience is to be expected when comparing a consumer level camera, with high pixel density, to pro level cameras with lower pixel density. I could easily have predicted the results in that comparison.

Compared to the D90....the D7000 does everything better. I predict the D7100 will also compare unfavorably to the D400

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TZ Photo
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Re: Edit
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 23, 2012

The lenses are spot on with the D3, with D7000 they need from -6 to -10 adjustment. (they backfocus).

I only use single point AF, use the center one or the neigbouring points. I'm commenting here focusing on static objects, the most simple situation.

Please don't think that since I have a D3 I am biased and cannot judge the D7000 fairly. I know what the cameras are. As I said the D7000 astonishes me with it's speed, and mechanical quality, previously I had the D90 and I could feel the difference when upgrading to D7000. But the D90 was giving me better color and tonality (gamma, curve, don't know what to name it). When I shoot in theatres I get colors that are not good, far from what I'm used to, and not in line with my experience. I shoot about 60 000 photos a year from which about 45 000 in theatres. I know my cameras inside out. The D3 has 250 000 actuations, I have been using it along D90 and now D7000. I sold the D90 for the D7000's quiet mode and better video.

Frankly, I don't have time to make a comparison but try to post examples of what I'm experiencing.

Mako2011 wrote:

Have you taken steps to determine if the lenses or the camera body needs to be calibrated again at the service center. Folks who have done this are often amazed at the outcome and kick them selves for not doing it sooner

Focus is unreliable.

How so? What AF modes do you most use? Do you change AF-Area modes based on subject/situation or have one you stick with? Under what lighting do you most often shoot? I ask as it helps determine if a trip to Nikon service might solve your problem. I also find my D7K AF to be superior to any other Nikon in this class. Are you simply comparing to the D3 only? If so, you will be disappointing until you replace your D7000 with a D4.

Many have found the metering system to be a big step up from previous Nikon's in this class. Do you change metering modes to fit the subject or do you rely on Matrix and not use compensation when required of the scene? Example photos from other D7K users seem to have really nice color and tonality. Do you shoot Raw? Are you using ADL? Again, trying to get a little more info to be steer you towards a possible solution.

Despite using custom settings the color and tonality of the files is nowhere near what I get from my D3. The back LCD also doesn't help. I thought it should be the same as in my D3, but it isn't.

That may be a major part of the dissatisfaction you feel. The D7K is not a D3. Many have voiced your same concerns when trying to compare there D7K to their older D40 or Fuji camera, and come away with similar conclusions. Flicker though suggests that, by and large, these aren't universal concerns.

I can't depend on it when judging brightness and color. Do you know it the technologies are different for those both screens?

The hardware is indeed different. You could actually calibrate you computer monitor to the imbedded JPG sRGB pic of the D7K LCD but I would not recommend that as it is not a true representation of the RAW file. If you shoot LV there will also be exposure differences from OVF shooting.

I'm an avid long time user of capture NX, I know how to fine tune my settings in this programm, but I don't like what I get from this camera and I really like Capture NX2 and use it always in my workflow. Another thing is that I can get very noticeably better sharpness through NX2 than jpg straight from the camera. Luckily I always shoot NEF+ jpg.

Of course they will differ depending on what Picture Control or custom setting you use. I start with zero sharpening and then apply that as a last step in PP. On another note, be sure your graphic drivers, software, and OS are updated. I had a significant loss of quality due to out date drivers. The files were fine but just displayed wrong by ViewNX2/CaptureNX2

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snowshovel 1
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

agree with you some photos simply brilliant othera not on the mark?

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Mako2011
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In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

TZ Photo wrote:

The lenses are spot on with the D3, with D7000 they need from -6 to -10 adjustment. (they backfocus).

Not uncommon and why it's so nice to have AF fine tune. -6 and -10 is really no reason to have the lens re-calibrated, IMO. Having a zero on one body and a -10 on another with the same lens really is within tolerances but I would love to see both Canon and Nikon decrease the tolerance range... though that may have a cost component passed on to us.

I only use single point AF, use the center one or the neigbouring points. I'm commenting here focusing on static objects, the most simple situation.

I have found (through testing and experience) that AF-Area mode "9pt" combined with AF-C and menu a3 set to off is far more precise in that situation (yes even static objects). Usually results in a doubling of the keeper rate to close to 100%. Using my macro lens inside a few inches, a whole different story though. The D7000 does seem to reward a wise/calculated choice of AF-Area mode. The over-sized FOV of the AF sensors, when compared to the focus box, seems to catch a few off guard. I also wonder what particular light characteristics they are most sensitive to. Many good discussions on that topic here and about.

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Dennis
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Silent mode
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

TZ Photo wrote:

The last thing is: yesterday I was shooting a concert next to a Canon photographer. I don't know which camera he had, but his silent mode was much more silent than mine and in live view his camera was almost completely silent unlike mine.

Funny, because I chose the D7000 over a Canon because it offers a quiet mode with PDAF. You have to get into the pro Canon models to get that. (Quiet mode in CDAF doesn't help me much). I think the 5DIII may now offer it (where I don't believe the 5DII did).

It's not silent (the D7000) ... but the shutter is pretty quiet even when not in 'Q' mode. It's a huge improvement over my previous DSLR, using Q mode or not.

  • Dennis

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mosswings
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Re: Doing the same thing
In reply to Mako2011, Apr 23, 2012

Mako2011 wrote:

joao salvador wrote:

I totally relate to your experience. Just that instead of a D3 I have a D300s and a D700. My original intention was to get the 7000 as a smaller, lighter and better IQ replacement for the D300s. However, during the first few months I had so many problems in adapting to the AF performance of the D7000 that I never sold the 300s.

When I pick the 300s (and the same happens with the 700), the focus is perfect 99% of times, with any lens and no micro-adjustements and the exposure is allways predictable. Not so with the D7000: even with micro-adjustments my keeper rate is much lower and sometimes I simply cannot get the camera to meter certain scenes correctly.

I am sure that if I could or wanted to take the time, each picture, to pay attention to the D7000 particularities, the performance would be better. But why should I do it when another camera, the 300s, performs beautifully at all levels without any added effort?

Anyway, I'm glad I kept the 300s. After six months, I'm selling the D7000 and will wait for its replacement.

Your experience is to be expected when comparing a consumer level camera, with high pixel density, to pro level cameras with lower pixel density. I could easily have predicted the results in that comparison.

Compared to the D90....the D7000 does everything better. I predict the D7100 will also compare unfavorably to the D400

Mako, are you simply saying that higher density sensors require a far more precise AF system, which - even though the D7000's sensor is a brand new design - is not in the D7000 precise enough? Or that the D7000 requires better shot technique? Or that Nikon's pro bodies have a metering system that is less focus-point-biased than their consumer line? Or something else?

With regards to possibility 1: let's watch what happens with the D800. It has an upgraded 51-point AF system ostensibly to handle slower lenses, but perhaps more importantly to discern smaller contrast differences. If people start complaining about the AF keeper rate, then we've got a clue.

With regards to possibility 2: aggh, the dang focus-point-centric metering issue. It started with the bitter complaints with the D80's MM, mitigated just a touch with the D90, and got better with the D7000. But the D300 and higher-end bodies are even less biased. Nikon thinks that the D7000 is a well-featured consumer body, but many D7000 buyers want it to be a cheaper pro body.

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Jim Holtz
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Re: Edit
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

I'd like to add to Mako2011's comments. I too find the D7000 to be extremely fast but I also find the focus to be extremely accurate once I found the correct settings. They're a combination of settings from a number of dedicated users including Mako2011 that I'd strongly recommend. Here they are:

Set AF mode to AF-C
a1 AF-C priority set to* Focus* (this is very important!).
a3 Set to OFF.
a6 Number of focus points = 39
f5 Assign AEL/AFL button to AF lock only.

I choose the number of AF points base on the requirements of my subject.
• 1 point for static objects.
• 9 points for slow or predictable direction moving subjects.

• 21 points for erratic moving subjects (like hummingbirds), that only fill a small portion of the scene.

With this AF set-up, keep your shutter button half pressed so the lens continuously adjusts focus until you actually fully depress the shutter. Focus and re-compose is accomplished by pushing and holding down the AFL button after subject focus is achieved.

I hope some will find these AF settings suggestions helpful to achieve more reliable AF results.

I've also observed frustration from a number of extremely experienced or professional photographers that have not taken the same time to learn the tool (D7000) that they did with their D300, D700, D3 etc. and they can't get the same keeper rate with the D7000. The focus system is new and unlike the other cameras mentioned. Try these settings and be aware of the actual focus area (larger) than the focus screen indicates.

BTW, did you have the D7000 in quiet shutter mode when comparing to the Canon?

Hope that helps!

Jim

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mjb2
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

I agree with the OP!

It is the focus that drives me crazy. "Something" happened last December and all my lenses were suddenly back focusing. I spent an afternoon getting very repeatable micro adjust values (for some lenses at -20) and was pretty happy. Just before the year warranty was up I sent the camera in for adjustment of the AF system. Came back much better. Did another round of microadjust measurement and settings. I'm happy.

Now, a month later, I took a bunch of images last Saturday at an event and every single shot was backfocussed. Ran a series of test images and found a very repeatable microadjust setting for the lens (17-55) that is 20 units different than before!

My inexpert conclusion is that there is some mechanical instability in the AF system. I don't know if it is all D7000 bodies or some of them or just mine.

Because I've had so many focus problems, I use the single, center AF point. Seems a shame sometimes to waste the sophisticated potential of the D7000 AF, but I hate to throw another variable into my AF problems.

I can't see repeatedly sending the camera body and lenses back to Nikon as a solution that anyone can be happy with!

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SmittenHobbyist
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to mjb2, Apr 23, 2012

TROLLLLOLILOLLLLLPLOP

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Mako2011
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Re: Doing the same thing
In reply to mosswings, Apr 23, 2012

mosswings wrote:

Mako2011 wrote:

joao salvador wrote:

I totally relate to your experience. Just that instead of a D3 I have a D300s and a D700. My original intention was to get the 7000 as a smaller, lighter and better IQ replacement for the D300s. However, during the first few months I had so many problems in adapting to the AF performance of the D7000 that I never sold the 300s.

When I pick the 300s (and the same happens with the 700), the focus is perfect 99% of times, with any lens and no micro-adjustements and the exposure is allways predictable. Not so with the D7000: even with micro-adjustments my keeper rate is much lower and sometimes I simply cannot get the camera to meter certain scenes correctly.

I am sure that if I could or wanted to take the time, each picture, to pay attention to the D7000 particularities, the performance would be better. But why should I do it when another camera, the 300s, performs beautifully at all levels without any added effort?

Anyway, I'm glad I kept the 300s. After six months, I'm selling the D7000 and will wait for its replacement.

Your experience is to be expected when comparing a consumer level camera, with high pixel density, to pro level cameras with lower pixel density. I could easily have predicted the results in that comparison.

Compared to the D90....the D7000 does everything better. I predict the D7100 will also compare unfavorably to the D400

Mako, are you simply saying that higher density sensors require a far more precise AF system, which - even though the D7000's sensor is a brand new design - is not in the D7000 precise enough? Or that the D7000 requires better shot technique?

What I think I'm trying to say is that higher pixel density sensors reward better techniques and hardware just as they reward better glass. The latest crop of high pixel density cameras not only have the potential for stunning shots, they also have the potential to make minor flaws of any kind more noticeable (regardless of brand/model) IMO

Or that Nikon's pro bodies have a metering system that is less focus-point-biased than their consumer line? Or something else?

The Pro bodies are just dang good at what they do....but the D7000 RGB meter and associated software is a big step up in many ways. The D4 and D800 have gone even further in improving on that just as the latest Canon pro meters seem to have stepped up the game (D7K meter is, after all, about to be replaced/upgraded as it's soon becomming the old man on the block )

... the dang focus-point-centric metering issue. It started with the bitter complaints with the D80's MM, mitigated just a touch with the D90, and got better with the D7000. But the D300 and higher-end bodies are even less biased. Nikon thinks that the D7000 is a well-featured consumer body, but many D7000 buyers want it to be a cheaper pro body.

Yes, expectations don't always meet real world. I like to keep mine low so that I get pleasantly surprised on a daily basis

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SMPhoto
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Another issue to watch for
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

Sometime AF is an issue in low light, but be sure that you read/test issues related to "mirror slap" in the D7000. There are several threads. I didn't read it, and had fought the issue until I finally figured it out on my own. It does seem to vary based on some saying they experience it, others not, but with my D7000, it simply cannot be shot below 1/250 sec reliably without the mirror locked up. Hand held or otherwise. I thought for a while it was a focus issue, because the effect looks as much like a slightly off focus than traditional motion blur. There are some that will say "all DSLRs have this, that's why there's mirror lockup", "you don't know how to hand hole"..blah blah, but that's simply not the case. This camera, at least mine, has vastly greater interference from the mirror than any other DSLR I've owned (and that's a pretty long list). Much greater than just increased pixel density can account for.

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fotolopithecus
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to SmittenHobbyist, Apr 23, 2012

I agree with the op's notion that he should sell his D7000. I believe the D7000 requires a deeper understanding of the camera, than some photographers are willing to invest time wise. If one does understand the D7000 good results will ensue reliably. I've recommended the site testcams.com many times for those truly interested in understanding the D7000, and the philosophy that went into its design. There is a series of three videos on it which are excellent. For those not willing to take the time by all means sell the camera, life's too short.

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TFergus
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to SmittenHobbyist, Apr 23, 2012

SmittenHobbyist wrote:

TROLLLLOLILOLLLLLPLOP

Don't speak with your mouth full Eugene...

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JakeB
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Re: Edit
In reply to Jim Holtz, Apr 23, 2012

Excellent advice, Jim.

The fact is, the D7000 has a surprisingly sophisticated and powerful focusing system that one needs to learn how to use effectively. Seems to me AF-C mode is particularly misunderstood.

Jim Holtz wrote:

I'd like to add to Mako2011's comments. I too find the D7000 to be extremely fast but I also find the focus to be extremely accurate once I found the correct settings. They're a combination of settings from a number of dedicated users including Mako2011 that I'd strongly recommend. Here they are:

Set AF mode to AF-C
a1 AF-C priority set to* Focus* (this is very important!).
a3 Set to OFF.
a6 Number of focus points = 39
f5 Assign AEL/AFL button to AF lock only.

I choose the number of AF points base on the requirements of my subject.
• 1 point for static objects.
• 9 points for slow or predictable direction moving subjects.

• 21 points for erratic moving subjects (like hummingbirds), that only fill a small portion of the scene.

With this AF set-up, keep your shutter button half pressed so the lens continuously adjusts focus until you actually fully depress the shutter. Focus and re-compose is accomplished by pushing and holding down the AFL button after subject focus is achieved.

I hope some will find these AF settings suggestions helpful to achieve more reliable AF results.

I've also observed frustration from a number of extremely experienced or professional photographers that have not taken the same time to learn the tool (D7000) that they did with their D300, D700, D3 etc. and they can't get the same keeper rate with the D7000. The focus system is new and unlike the other cameras mentioned. Try these settings and be aware of the actual focus area (larger) than the focus screen indicates.

BTW, did you have the D7000 in quiet shutter mode when comparing to the Canon?

Hope that helps!

Jim

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David Grabowski
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to mjb2, Apr 23, 2012

So far all my lenses are at -3 and remain so. However, I urge you to follow the simple guide of others here and just slip that camera into AF-C 9 pt and see what you get as a general setting. Don't forget the internal settings that go with it. I did that, coming from a long line of AF-S shooting and using single point in the D100, the D70 as well which AF-C IMO was so so with those. After changing the 7000 to AF-C 9pt things got much better.

You can always change it back agin ! nOw and then I use AF-S, heck every so often I use AF-A.

David

mjb2 wrote:

I agree with the OP!

It is the focus that drives me crazy. "Something" happened last December and all my lenses were suddenly back focusing. I spent an afternoon getting very repeatable micro adjust values (for some lenses at -20) and was pretty happy. Just before the year warranty was up I sent the camera in for adjustment of the AF system. Came back much better. Did another round of micro adjust measurement and settings. I'm happy.

Now, a month later, I took a bunch of images last Saturday at an event and every single shot was back focussed. Ran a series of test images and found a very repeatable micro adjust setting for the lens (17-55) that is 20 units different than before!

My inexpert conclusion is that there is some mechanical instability in the AF system. I don't know if it is all D7000 bodies or some of them or just mine.

Because I've had so many focus problems, I use the single, center AF point. Seems a shame sometimes to waste the sophisticated potential of the D7000 AF, but I hate to throw another variable into my AF problems.

I can't see repeatedly sending the camera body and lenses back to Nikon as a solution that anyone can be happy with!

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mjb2
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Re: The D7000 has two personalities and that's a problem
In reply to David Grabowski, Apr 23, 2012

I had to chuckle at the very predictable "this camera is just too sophisticated for the dumb and lazy" responses.

I have indeed read a lot, gotten many useful tips from the smart folks who post here and have experimented carefully with most of the D7000 focus modes. My problem seems to be stability of the zeropoint of the focus system. I use the usual setups to check micro adjust for a particular lens. I was surprised with the zooms (I use the 17-55 most of the time) that I can run a series of tests at different focal lengths and different distances and get very consistent best value for microadjust (all within 5 adjustment units).

As I stated, things work great till they don't! In the last 5 months I have had two significant changes in zeropoint. Had to re-test every lens I own and they all moved by a significant amount. So, something is changing in the camera.

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Tonality and skin tones are big for me
In reply to TZ Photo, Apr 23, 2012

It wasn't long ago that I posted side-by-side samples of the D7000 and D700 showing that skin tones wasn't an issue. It just so happened the lighting was well-controlled. Recenlty I've had some very unnerving times where matching D7K and D700 color for shots taken in the same mixed or challenging lighting has been a heroic effort. I like the D7K mostly for landscape work now, but I am slowly beginning to distrust it for photos with people in them. I hate to eat crow, but sometimes that's all they're serving.

I now have two D700 for my wedding work, and will be relegating the D7000 purely for last ditch backup for that and portraiture, and using it as my primary travel/hiking body for ourdoor photography.

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