Crop vs Stitch Pano

Started Mar 20, 2012 | Discussions
Neil Morgan
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Crop vs Stitch Pano
Mar 20, 2012

Hi Everyone,

I went to the city for a walk on the weekend and shot the same place twice once for crop to pano and three shots to stitch.

Here's how they turned out, all shot using the same lens and FL, although portrait orientation for the stitched shots.

Apart from the stitch issue, please don't look for it for this , see which one you think is stitch and which one is crop and see if it makes sense.

Camera = D700 + 14-24

Cheers Neil

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Leonard Shepherd
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Re: Crop vs Stitch Pano
In reply to Neil Morgan, Mar 20, 2012

For those unsure the clues are in the regularity of the curve in the green circle, and whether the base of the blue tiles on the left are parallel to the base of the image, or points.

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Leonard Shepherd

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_sem_
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Re: Crop vs Stitch Pano
In reply to Neil Morgan, Mar 20, 2012

Neil Morgan wrote:

Apart from the stitch issue, please don't look for it for this , see which one you think is stitch and which one is crop and see if it makes sense.

This is a projection issue. There's no perfect way of mapping an ultra-wide scene to 2D. Rectilinear (top) keeps straight lines straight, but expands the edges and turns circular things in the corners into ovals. What you get with stitching depends on the projection the program uses (which one is it?). "Best result" depends on image content and your personal preferences.

Some stitching programs support several different projections. The free Hugin panorama program for instance lets you convert to rectilinear, fisheye, stereographic (Samyang 8mm fisheye), cylindrical and a bunch of other projections (several variations of cylindrical). It may be used for either stitching sets or single images as input. It is rather clumsy to handle in the beginning though. It can use EXIF image data for quick tests, but it is able to build a PTlens-like lens correction profile for your lens if you provide a suitable set of images for a 3D pano.

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RBFresno
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Re: Crop vs Stitch Pano-- Nice Demo!Hi
In reply to Neil Morgan, Mar 20, 2012
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Skroob
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Re: Crop vs Stitch Pano
In reply to Neil Morgan, Mar 21, 2012

Interesting results, and both have their issues.

The top one give a sense of "tunnel vision" and also distorts the thickness of the columns as they get closer to the edge of the image.

The bottom one is a bit too 'flat' though to really get a feel of the space.

As said above, turning 3D into 2D will always have its flaws.

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BoyOhBoy
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Re: Crop vs Stitch Pano
In reply to _sem_, Mar 27, 2012

sem wrote:

This is a projection issue. There's no perfect way of mapping an ultra-wide scene to 2D. Rectilinear (top) keeps straight lines straight, but expands the edges and turns circular things in the corners into ovals. What you get with stitching depends on the projection the program uses (which one is it?). "Best result" depends on image content and your personal preferences.

Paralax correction with an appropriate leveling head and nodal slide will eliminate stitching problems, particularly if you stay away from the corners of the frame.

http://reallyrightstuff.com/WebsiteInfo.aspx?fc=84

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