Remember Kodachrome?

Started Mar 7, 2012 | Discussions
Beezodog
Contributing MemberPosts: 506Gear list
Like?
Remember Kodachrome?
Mar 7, 2012

http://pavel-kosenko.livejournal.com/303194.html?thread=22669914

Some 4x5 images in dark surroundings. Shades of the Artists Underground Pub...
--

Eric Geoffrey Vann
http://www.beezodogsplace.com

 Beezodog's gear list:Beezodog's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P7800
DaiG
Contributing MemberPosts: 996
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Beezodog, Mar 7, 2012

25 ASA (and 64 ASA) was a superb film. That's when you learned techniques for hand-holding with ridiculously slow exposure times!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Seedeich
Contributing MemberPosts: 842
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Beezodog, Mar 7, 2012

Thanks for sharing.
These images are impressive. The resolution of these huge slides is amazing.

When you study the light and shadows, it’s obvious that the photographers brought some serious lighting equipment.

It’s also interesting that they worked with a pretty deep DoF. No attempt to create blurry bokeh.

This means, they must have stopped the lenses of these huge cameras way down to achieve this deep DoF. Given the low sensibility (probably max 50 ISO) of the film, it required lots of light.
--
Seedeich on Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/seedeich/tags/v1/

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
JacquesBalthazar
Regular MemberPosts: 450Gear list
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Beezodog, Mar 7, 2012

wow! Beautiful pics, in a great condition considering their age (practically no discolouring) . Kodachrome was really archival quality.

Great scans as well. Does the commentary say what kind of scanner was used?

 JacquesBalthazar's gear list:JacquesBalthazar's gear list
Nikon Df Nikon AF Nikkor 180mm f/2.8D ED-IF Nikon AF-S Nikkor 85mm f/1.4G Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 2/50 Voigtlander 58mm F1.4 Nokton SL II +21 more
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Beezodog
Contributing MemberPosts: 506Gear list
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Seedeich, Mar 7, 2012

I am quite certain that "bokeh" was not a primary visual tool until the advent of the "smaller" lens formats of 35mm. If you think about it the really long lenses did not exist on the typical 16x20, 8x10, 5x7 or 4x5 cameras. In fact "bokeh" would have been considered a "technical problem" since everyone wanted to achieve vast depth of field because the handmade lenses of the day were crummy when you attempt to use much other than the center.

For that reason the f/64 group arrived at a name that described the optimal aperture opening for the lenses they used. I'd be surprised if you see much bouquet on the "typical" lenses used medium format cameras. Again it is the size of the lens that prohibits much in the way of long focal length lens use.

35mm brought about the chance (because of its small size) for very long focal length lenses that could be managed without having it mounted in the side of a truck. Try and imagine a 800mm or 1,000mm equivalent for even a 4x5 field camera. How long would that have to be?

My wife's uncle owned a print shop where the camera (an 8x10) used to copy printed documents was mounted in the wall of the darkroom. Longer lenses like that needed to keep distortion to a minimum were simply not manageable under normal circumstances. Besides it meant you could take the shot (they use extremely brilliant magnesium(?) illumination) without having to load up a bunch of film holders each time. You simply made the image and dropped it immediately into the developer trays when you were done. The darkroom was in fact the camera!

Guess this was the equivalent of todays electronic sensors when you let your imagination run.

Seedeich wrote:

It’s also interesting that they worked with a pretty deep DoF. No attempt to create blurry bokeh.

-- hide signature --
 Beezodog's gear list:Beezodog's gear list
Nikon Coolpix P7800
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Philip
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,649
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Beezodog, Mar 7, 2012

Thank you for sharing. Really great photos and superb color.
--
Philip

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
CLG52
Forum MemberPosts: 50
Like?
Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to Beezodog, Mar 9, 2012

I believe these are originally from the library of congress. While these look great they really do not do justice to the color or detail that Kodachrome produced. In my galleries on flickr I have # 36 and the color is closer to what the original photo produced. Also If I remember correctly you can go to the Library of Congress and download the original scan. the file is very large but also very impressive. Here is the link to the Flickr photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/2179930812/sizes/o/in/gallery-getchius-72157623928868973/

Please note I said my gallery, actually it is a gallery of some of my favorite photos taken by other photographers. I am old but not that old. But boy I wish I had taken some of those photos.

Thanks for link and and thanks for reminding us all what photography use to be like. I love all the photos.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
CLG52
Forum MemberPosts: 50
Like?
PS Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to CLG52, Mar 9, 2012
  1. 36 has no copyright restrictions

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
kayaker353
Regular MemberPosts: 406
Like?
Re: PS Re: Remember Kodachrome?
In reply to CLG52, Mar 10, 2012

I recall using a 4X5 SLR, which I think was called Graflex. It had at least a 250 to 300 mm lens and very limited depth of feild. I was never very successful with it as it had manual stopdown and a very dark finder. I bet it had bokeh, if you could get anything in focus and were strong enough to hold it still!

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
bowman
Contributing MemberPosts: 538Gear list
Like?
Re: PS Re: Thanks for posting these, Could have been my mother>
In reply to kayaker353, Mar 12, 2012

Thanks for posting this series, brilliant and of special interest to myself. My mother worked at an aircraft factory in the UK as did my grandfather. On my mothers marriage certificate in 1942 her occupation is recorded as"Aircraft Fitter".

As a boy I kept finding rivits, drills etc. in my grandads shed, I still have and use one of the rivit guns,
Thanks again
John Bowman. North Wales. UK

 bowman's gear list:bowman's gear list
Nikon D700
Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum MMy threads