External Monitor for D7000

Started Oct 17, 2011 | Discussions
NLH
NLH
Regular MemberPosts: 110
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External Monitor for D7000
Oct 17, 2011

Can anyone suggest a decent external monitor for my D7000? I do on-site portraits and would like to have a decent monitor that the "moms" can view their kids pictures and choose a shot. I would need a 'live' monitor so they can see them as they are shot. I have tried a small flat screen TV but the resolution is bad. How about a tablet like the Thrive that has ports?

mosswings
Veteran MemberPosts: 5,760Gear list
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Re: External Monitor for D7000
In reply to NLH, Oct 17, 2011

NLH wrote:

Can anyone suggest a decent external monitor for my D7000? I do on-site portraits and would like to have a decent monitor that the "moms" can view their kids pictures and choose a shot. I would need a 'live' monitor so they can see them as they are shot. I have tried a small flat screen TV but the resolution is bad. How about a tablet like the Thrive that has ports?

You might want to consider "tethering" software that would allow you to hook up the laptop of your choice to your camera. There are several companies that make monitors that hook up to the HDMI port; Marshall is amongst the best known:

http://www.amazon.com/Marshall-M-LCD7-HDMI-BNEL3-Portable-Camera-Monitor/dp/B0044VPOPM/ref=pd_sim_sbs_p2

These monitors, while of good quality, are really designed for use as monitors when shooting video, so tend to be fairly small.

Now, if all you want is simply a good desktop monitor for review, I'd advise you to ask your question in the PC forum, or look up postings by the member NewSyl. He regularly posts summaries of the best photo-appropriate monitors at various price points. For example, at the $400 price point of the aforementioned Marshall you can obtain a very nice 23" IPS Dell or HP monitor. You won't be able to color calibrate either without an attending laptop, though, so color accuracy won't be perfect, but it should be worlds better than what you get with most laptop screens.

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sic0048
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Re: External Monitor for D7000
In reply to mosswings, Oct 17, 2011

Another option if you don't want to shoot tethered (although I think that is the best solution) is to look into an Eye-Fi Wifi card that will download pictures instantly to a computer or tablet. I use it to download JPEGs to an Apple iPad and it works pretty well. I use the smallest JPEG set for medium quality and it generally will take about 5-8 seconds for a picture to appear on the iPad after being taken and the pictures look great on the iPad.

I have a D7000 which has two SDHC card slots, so I shoot RAW+JPEG use a second card to save my RAW files when I need to use the Eye-Fi and iPad solution. I actually don't use it very often, but it is great for on-location shoots when you want to check lighting, etc, or for a situation like you described where you want another party to be able to view the pictures instantly. (Normally I shoot just RAW and use the 2nd SDHC slot as a backup to the 1st slot.)

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NewsyL
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Re: External Monitor for D7000
In reply to mosswings, Oct 17, 2011

mosswings wrote:

NLH wrote:

Can anyone suggest a decent external monitor for my D7000? I do on-site portraits and would like to have a decent monitor that the "moms" can view their kids pictures and choose a shot. I would need a 'live' monitor so they can see them as they are shot. I have tried a small flat screen TV but the resolution is bad. How about a tablet like the Thrive that has ports?

You might want to consider "tethering" software that would allow you to hook up the laptop of your choice to your camera. There are several companies that make monitors that hook up to the HDMI port; Marshall is amongst the best known:

http://www.amazon.com/Marshall-M-LCD7-HDMI-BNEL3-Portable-Camera-Monitor/dp/B0044VPOPM/ref=pd_sim_sbs_p2

These monitors, while of good quality, are really designed for use as monitors when shooting video, so tend to be fairly small.

Now, if all you want is simply a good desktop monitor for review, I'd advise you to ask your question in the PC forum, or look up postings by the member NewSyl. He regularly posts summaries of the best photo-appropriate monitors at various price points. For example, at the $400 price point of the aforementioned Marshall you can obtain a very nice 23" IPS Dell or HP monitor. You won't be able to color calibrate either without an attending laptop, though, so color accuracy won't be perfect, but it should be worlds better than what you get with most laptop screens.

My script found this thread....

Can you use the HDMI out port of the D7000 to connect to an inexpensive external monitor for live viewing and review?

If so, consider this monitor - the ASUS ML239H .

Why?

... inexpensive (under $200 USD)
... has a HDMI input
... uses an IPS panel (wide viewing angles)
... can be set reasonably bright (up to 250 nits aka 250 cd/m2)
... calibrates well

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/asus_ml239h.htm

http://www.buy.com/prod/asus-ml239h-23-led-lcd-monitor-16-9-5-ms-adjustable-display-angle-1920/220392152.html

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Viewing Angles

When people look over your shoulder at the monitor, you will want them to be able to see more or less the same colors from various angles. The e-IPS tft LCD panel of this monitor provides that.

ASUS ML239H with IPS panel

TN tft panel
(per TFT Central BenQ XL2410T review http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews.htm )

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Brightness

This is likely where you may have some challenges. Some LCD monitors are now able to get as bright as 400 cd/m2 of white luminance which may give you some headroom for outdoor work. I imagine that if outdoors you'll likely be shooting with a portable awning/tent to cover the equipment and this could provide enough shade that the screen does not have to get too bright.

The ASUS has a matte screen so reflections will be minimized as compared to the glossy screens of many inexpensive entertainment type monitors or under $1000 laptops.

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Calibration

When you calibrate a monitor with a device like a Spyder or i1Display the base settings of the PC's video card control the appearance of the monitor. You may be able to get a great calibration off the PC but when connected to the D7000 it will be skewed.

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Power

It won't run on batteries like a tablet but this is something that can be addressed with a 1500va UPS which are getting reasonably inexpensive.

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Newsy http://newsy.smugmug.com

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