Printing your work.

Started Oct 16, 2011 | Discussions
RaymondC
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Printing your work.
Oct 16, 2011

Hello All,

I tried to post this in the printing forum, but with no luck. For 10 years I have been taking photos for electronic publication, some print, etc., but I really don't have much experience printing my photos larger than 8x10. (Largely due to procrastination). My wife an I have allocated some areas in our new home to hang some larger prints, and I was curious if anyone has suggestions on what to print on.

I have read recent blog posts from Moose Petereson, and and older Scott Kelby post on metal prints from bayphoto and imagewizards. These look beautiful online, and I will probably get a test print made, but this are expensive. What other options do I have?? Metallic paper? Glicee? What do most folks on this forum prefer??

I appreciate your input,
Raymond

olakiril2
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to RaymondC, Oct 16, 2011

Large metallic prints from MPix look very good on the wall and you can't say that they are expensive.

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RaymondC
Forum MemberPosts: 64
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to olakiril2, Oct 16, 2011

I would agree that metallic prints are not expensive, and that is certainly an option.

My expensive comment was to prints from Image Wizards and BayPhoto that are actually printed on a sheet of aluminum. See links:
http://www.scottkelby.com/blog/2009/archives/6589
http://imagewizards.net/upload/

So my curiosity is in the quality of how things compare. Is aluminum head and shoulders above regular metallic prints? What do folks prefer??

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Catallaxy
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to RaymondC, Oct 16, 2011

I print on canvas, glossy, lustre, matte, metallic, true B&W, and on metal.

So which do I choose for a particular print? The medium that will work best to give teh look that I want.

canvas is good for very large prints and you can get a gallery wrap that does not even need a frame. However you lose resolution and lose fine detail.

glossy is good for prints behind museum glass. It is terrible for things that might get touched and have fingerprints on it.

luster is the workhorse, good for just about anything. Use a texture like Irish Linen to add interest to the photo.

matte is good for photos framed without glass, or in areas with high reflections and light spillover. You lose a tiny bit of resolution with matte.

metallic is good for vivid colors. Think macros and such. You lose some edge sharpness, I think, but gain some very vivid colors. I have a few portraits with this where the woman's eyes or hair are the focal point and the colors really pop - but I have also tried to print some regular portraits on it and it was not as nice as lustre or glossy.

True B&W gives a cleaner greys and blacks (not green-greys or magenta blacks) and I use it for all my B&W photos.

Prints on metal are very expensive for what you get. You basically do this so that you do not have to frame the result and can have interesting pieces.

A suggestion: You might just crop out an 8x10 part of an image that you wish to print larger so you can see if the print is going to look good at that higher print size. I did this to help me determine which print lab did the best job for various papers. Over 22 print labs later, I now know exactly which print labs do the best for various paper types and images. Relatively inexpensive compared to ordering a dozen huge prints from a print lab and then finding out that they stink (either the print lab stinks or the photos do not have enough resolution, sharpness, saturation, etc to look good printed 40x60).

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Catallaxy

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Meuh
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to Catallaxy, Oct 16, 2011

I find whitewall.com to be very good and even do laser to real photo paper if you wish.

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ddolde
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to RaymondC, Nov 2, 2011

That isn't correct to say they are printed on metal. They are first printed on a transfer media using dye based ink then fused to a specially coated sheet of aluminum under high heat and pressure. Hence the name dye-infused metal print.
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Doug Dolde
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David Rosser
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Re: Printing your work.
In reply to RaymondC, Nov 3, 2011

RaymondC wrote:

Hello All,

Glicee?

I appreciate your input,
Raymond

Giclee is a made up word and is just another way of saying "high quality ink jet print", it's what you get if you use any of the top of the line A3+ ink jet printers. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gicl%C3%A9e By the way the base French word which means to squirt has some rather smutty connotations in France
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