Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference

Started Sep 21, 2011 | Discussions
Arnaud M
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Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
Sep 21, 2011

I'm going to choose one of these printers. I have read several post about the difference in purchase price between these 2 models including the amount of ink that came with the 3880 and it seemed, according to the prices quoted, be for the benefit of 3880.
However, recent price adjustments (in France) modify the choice.

Indeed, particularly in France, we find the R3000 to 635 € and 3880 to 1249 €. In addition, the R3000 cartridges cost 20.20 € against 49.90 € for 3880.

The price is to 20.20/25.9 ml = 0.78 € for R3000

The price is to 49.90/80 ml = 0623 € for 3880

The cost difference between the two printers is 614 €.

The R3000 comes with 25.9x9 = 233ml
The PRO 3880 comes with 80x9 = 720ml

The 614 € price difference can buy the equivalent of 614/0.78 = 787 ml of ink is much more than the difference of ink which is supplied 720-233 = 487ml

The advantage seems to go back to the R3000 for a user with reasonable requirements in terms of printing. Of course, if the print volumes are important, the cost of ink from the 3880 is 25.2% cheaper than the R3000.

The number of prints made on the R3000 to meet the purchase price of 3880 is to:

Ink volume consumed: 787ml 233 ml = 1020ml

The average consumption of A4 is a 0.93ml (personal assessment)

This represents approximately 1020/0.93ml 1096 A4 prints or 548 A3 prints.

Already a lot for an amateur.

Just my thoughts.

You point of view are welcome.
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Phil Hill
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Arnaud M, Sep 21, 2011

The R3000 has features that the 3880 lacks but the 3880 might be more economical for somebody making large numbers of prints. And the 3880 is obviously better for somebody that needs a 17-inch printer.

The R3000 was best for me.

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Steve Dell
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Arnaud M, Sep 21, 2011

Interesting analysis.

When I was in the market for a new printer, going from the R1800, my best option was the 3880. The 2880 and 2400 were the other options but both had small cartridges.

I opted for the 3880 and love it. BTW, you also will be able to get priority tech support since this is in their "professional" product line.

With a properly calibrated monitor and appropriate printer profiles, you'll be very happy with the results.
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Klaus Weber
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Arnaud M, Oct 22, 2011

Thanks for this interesting calculation. Have you already taken a decision?

I am in the same situation now, but beside the price/size/features I am also thinking about the quality of print. It seems to be clear that both are great, but the 3000 has even better technical specs - smaller drops (2 picoliters vs. 3.5 for the 3880), resulting in even higher resolution (5760 x 1440 dpi vs. 2880 x 1440 dpi).

So the 3000 should even produce better prints, or?

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Phil Hill
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Klaus Weber, Oct 22, 2011

Klaus Weber wrote:

So the 3000 should even produce better prints, or?

The 3880 is optimized for larger prints, hence the different specs.

The only time you’d ever see a difference, though, would be on small prints examined very closely, and it might even require a magnifier.

Having said that, unless you need a 17-inch model or are a high-volume printer, the R3000 may be a better choice. For my purposes, the R3000 had a better feature set, and using 80ml of ink within Epson’s recommended six-month time period (after opening) would not have been possible. I know that the ink doesn’t just suddenly go bad on a certain date, but I wouldn’t even come close.

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Petruska
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Resolution....
In reply to Klaus Weber, Oct 22, 2011

The R2880 has a 3 pl droplet size and has the same 5760 x 1440 resolution as the R3000, 2 pl droplet size. So does this mean that there is a lot of blank space between droplets on the 3000 versus the 2880? If yes, then the R3000 image IQ could be compromised.

I doubt than anyone looking at the same print at the correct viewing distance would see any IQ differences between the the 2880/3000/3880.

Bob P.

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Phil Hill
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Re: Resolution....
In reply to Petruska, Oct 23, 2011

Petruska wrote:

The R2880 has a 3 pl droplet size and has the same 5760 x 1440 resolution as the R3000, 2 pl droplet size. So does this mean that there is a lot of blank space between droplets on the 3000 versus the 2880? If yes, then the R3000 image IQ could be compromised.

Maximum printer resolution is primarily determined by the smallest stepping increment of the print head, not droplet size, I believe. And printer resolution (not to be confused with image resolution) primarily affects the ability to reproduce continuous tones, smooth transitions and accurate colors.

Both printers have variable droplet sizes, and the figures you cited are only for the smallest available size. I believe the droplet size also affects tonal gradations, not resolution directly. In any event, the R3000 has a newer-generation screening algorithm (AccuPhoto HD2), so I’m sure there are no “gaps.” Epson wouldn’t have made the reduction if print quality was going to suffer.

I agree that ordinary viewing won't show a difference.

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Apotheker
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Very good altenative: refillable cartridges...tested by myself
In reply to Arnaud M, Oct 23, 2011

If you want good alternatives, both for the Epson Pro 3880 and the R3000 there are good alternatives, see here:

http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=7105

at the end my youtube-movie:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FsEuOh8cvw

And this is from my Epson Pro 3800 (similar to the Epson Pro 3880):

http://www.nifty-stuff.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=4746

And on youtube you will find several movies created by me (I have created french tag words as well, so finding them is easier for the french speaking among us).

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Arnaud M
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Klaus Weber, Nov 30, 2011

Finaly, I just bought the EPSON R3000 because of the price drop : 609 € in France

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backayonder
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Following this thread with interest
In reply to Apotheker, Dec 1, 2011

I used to develop and print my own black and white films in a darkroom.

Even though i have a decent Eizo monitor I have never printed my own digital work apart from using a basic printer more for documents than photography.

So now my thoughts are turning towards getting a R3880 so I can print my own work and hopefully sell it at markets.

In december I have been invited to exhibit my work at a local exhibition. I can buy A2 size images for about $29AUD unmounted from Redbubble.

Does anyone know the cost of printing an A2 image using a R3880?
A pack of fineart A2 paper costs about $450 for 50 sheets

How many A2 images can I expect from a set of ink?

Cheers Dean

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jashilphotography
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to backayonder, Dec 1, 2011

Hi Dean,

Being the nerd that I am I keep a spreadsheet of my ink & paper usage so I know how much each print uses.

Printing the following image (note I do not print borderless the prints are intended to be framed):

on Epson A2 Hot Press Bright costs me approximately $11.97 AUD. This is broken down to the following:

Ink: 3.7ml @ $1.36/mL
Paper: $6.93 Sheet

As a second example, the following image (excluding the black borders) costs around $8.36 to print to A2 (including paper) - it consumed 0.9mL of ink:

I have printed A3+ images which have consumed up to 2.2mL ink so it can be a bit of pot luck on what amount of ink an image uses.

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Hugowolf
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to backayonder, Dec 1, 2011

backayonder wrote:

Does anyone know the cost of printing an A2 image using a R3880?

Here is the US with each replacement cartridge priced at about US$46, I reckon on average 65¢ per square foot for ink. That doesn’t include ink used in changing from matt black to photo black, nor does it include the cost of the printer amortized.

Brian A

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gipper51
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to Hugowolf, Dec 1, 2011

Well look at it this way: The 3880 comes with 80ml ink tanks out of the box. The 3000 comes with 25ml tanks, so basically you need to buy two more full sets of carts with the 3000 to get what the 3880 starts out with. Buying the 3000 + 2 full sets of carts won't be much cheaper than the price of a 3880.

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btolley
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Re: Epson R3000 vs 3880 financial difference
In reply to Arnaud M, Dec 1, 2011

Good choice. I'm sure you will like it. I went through the same process, but unless you are printing 17" prints regularly and/or printing larger volumes, I think the 3880 is too much.

I absolutely love my 3000, which I've had for a couple of months. just have to get an IPS monitor now.

Enjoy,

Brett

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bronxbombers
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R3000 better
In reply to Petruska, Dec 1, 2011

Petruska wrote:

The R2880 has a 3 pl droplet size and has the same 5760 x 1440 resolution as the R3000, 2 pl droplet size. So does this mean that there is a lot of blank space between droplets on the 3000 versus the 2880? If yes, then the R3000 image IQ could be compromised.

I doubt than anyone looking at the same print at the correct viewing distance would see any IQ differences between the the 2880/3000/3880.

Bob P.

Actually someone said the stunning Hahnemuhle Photo Rag and FIne Art Pearl don't work as well on the 3880 because the large 3880 droplets and much lower res make that super sharp paper show up the ink blobs, on the fine 2pl and 5760x1440 R3000 there is no issue, just stunningly sharp 3D-like prints.

They never have gaps.

The smaller 2pl drops and fine stepping size give R3000 apparent (never seen the R3880 on those papers myself) win.

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richardplondon
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to gipper51, Dec 2, 2011

gipper51 wrote:

Well look at it this way: The 3880 comes with 80ml ink tanks out of the box. The 3000 comes with 25ml tanks, so basically you need to buy two more full sets of carts with the 3000 to get what the 3880 starts out with. Buying the 3000 + 2 full sets of carts won't be much cheaper than the price of a 3880.

These two printers seem to be priced more comparably for N America buyers, than they are in (for example) Europe.

In the UK, the R3000 plus two sets of inks totals £945 (and the ink purchases are deferrable). The R3880 costs £1135 (up front). That's uncompetitive IMO, unless quite high printing volumes are being factored in over a longish period.

RP

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andy bp
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to jashilphotography, Dec 2, 2011

jashilphotography wrote:

Hi Dean,

Being the nerd that I am I keep a spreadsheet of my ink & paper usage so I know how much each print uses.

Printing the following image (note I do not print borderless the prints are intended to be framed):

on Epson A2 Hot Press Bright costs me approximately $11.97 AUD. This is broken down to the following:

Ink: 3.7ml @ $1.36/mL
Paper: $6.93 Sheet

As a second example, the following image (excluding the black borders) costs around $8.36 to print to A2 (including paper) - it consumed 0.9mL of ink:

I have printed A3+ images which have consumed up to 2.2mL ink so it can be a bit of pot luck on what amount of ink an image uses.

It's probably that amount of black ink required for the first image.

The way I think about it is the whiter the image, the less ink required, as obviously the paper is already white, so you are nearly there

Think I'm going to do more high key shots for my clients!!

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gipper51
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to richardplondon, Dec 4, 2011

richardplondon wrote:

gipper51 wrote:

Well look at it this way: The 3880 comes with 80ml ink tanks out of the box. The 3000 comes with 25ml tanks, so basically you need to buy two more full sets of carts with the 3000 to get what the 3880 starts out with. Buying the 3000 + 2 full sets of carts won't be much cheaper than the price of a 3880.

These two printers seem to be priced more comparably for N America buyers, than they are in (for example) Europe.

In the UK, the R3000 plus two sets of inks totals £945 (and the ink purchases are deferrable). The R3880 costs £1135 (up front). That's uncompetitive IMO, unless quite high printing volumes are being factored in over a longish period.

RP

True, the regional prices affect that alot.

I know this is another debate and just my opinion, but for an amateur home user the price of OEM ink is does not make printing even enjoyable! To me the whole purpose of buying a quality home printer is to print ALOT! If I bought the R3000 or 3880 my first course of action would be to sell the new cartridges and use those funds to purchase a high quality 3rd party system. From then on the cost of ink is hardly worth fretting over.

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Phil Hill
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Re: Following this thread with interest
In reply to gipper51, Dec 4, 2011

gipper51 wrote:

To me the whole purpose of buying a quality home printer is to print ALOT!

You’re absolutely right, it’s dependent on individual situations. The sole reason I purchase quality printers is to make quality prints that look precisely the way I want them to, not to make a greater number of prints.

Owning a printer doesn’t in any way raise the percentage of my photos that are worthy of being printed. In fact, printer ownership didn’t lead to high-volume printing for me, any more than my wet darkroom did in years past.

I agree with everyone here that's said the volume being printed is an important factor to consider when deciding which model to purchase, and also whether to switch to a non-OEM ink system. But it works both ways because not everybody will make enough prints to justify moving away from OEM ink or to a different printer model. And not everybody wants to spend valuable time refilling cartridges and profiling ink/paper combos.

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Photo Pete
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Don't forget wastage in changing cartridges
In reply to Arnaud M, Dec 6, 2011

The larger cartridges of the r3880 will mean that you will end up changing each colour cartridge of the r3000 3x more frequently. That is a LOT of extra ink wastage in the cartridge charging and cleaning process.

The running costs of the 3880 will consequently be significantly less than for the 3000, not just a little bit less as your figures suggest.

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