:::::Weekly Street Photography - September 11th:::::

Started Sep 11, 2011 | Discussions
Peter Dumont
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:::::Weekly Street Photography - September 11th:::::
Sep 11, 2011

.

The Weekly Street Photography of sunday the eleventh of September is here.

First of all I'd like to thank Chris (xtoph) for hosting WSP last week -
Thanks Chris !

For streetpictures that at one glance tell a story without needing
to use words we have the ::: DECISIVE MOMENT CORNER :::

Underneath that you can find the ::: HISTORICAL CORNER ::: where you can
post your personal favorites from masters of street photography of the past!

Below that is the ::: TECHNICAL CORNER ::: where you can post
technical tips and/or questions concerning street photography.

Next we have the ::: PORTRAITS CORNER ::: where you can post
your candid street portraits .

And last but not least we have ::: THIS WEEKS THEME :::
where you can post photographs that fit in with this weeks theme.

General street photos that don't fit in any of the above categories
should be posted in " the Street Photography eXchange " -
( see elsewhere on this forum for the current thread )

You can find the WSP Archives here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1052&message=39328121

Streetphotography isn't about architecture; it is the art of
photographing people in the city as they interact with other people,
their surroundings, or with YOU; the photographer.

As a rule: "STREET" = any public space

There are many different ways and styles to do streetphotography.
You can use a long tele-lens and work as a sniper hoping people
won't notice you, or you can use a wide lens and engage with the people
you are capturing with your camera.

Streetphotography is a rewarding form of photography
where style, personality, and serendipity become a part of the picture.

Frank Dobbs wrote:
"Street photography is the poetry of the street."

"Street photography is a state of mind, a way of looking at the world
that is both realistic, per force, and romantic, and thoughtful.
This is HCB's hand, and heart and mind.

"It understands that man, not birds in flight, or insects, or trees,
is the most beautiful mystery in the created world.
But Streetphotography extends that subset of art, and poetry,
that believes that man does not sit still to be best captured,
that the ineffable mystery of the human heart, and life, is caught
on the wing, that it catches the throat and makes tears rise up
from unexpected places.

"We live like water spiders, striding, and skittering
across the surface of a great ocean of joy and pain
that Streetphotography crystallizes into that we dare not look at,
really look at, for more than a few seconds at a time."

Peter Dumont
Veteran MemberPosts: 9,135
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:::::Decisive moment: for when it all comes together:::::
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

In 1952, Cartier-Bresson published his book Images à la sauvette,
whose English edition was titled The Decisive Moment .

It included a portfolio of 126 of his photos from the East and the West.
The book's cover was drawn by Henri Matisse.

In the Preface he wrote:

"Photography is simultaneously and instantaneously
the recognition of a fact and the rigorous organization of
visually perceived forms that express and signify that fact"

"Photography is not like painting," Cartier-Bresson told the Washington Post in 1957.
"There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture.
Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you,
and you must know with intuition when to click the camera.
That is the moment the photographer is creative," he said.
" Oop! The Moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever ."

In this corner of WSP we invite you to post streetpictures
that at one glance tell a story without needing to use words !

IOW no streetportraits or scenes where nothing much is happening,
but photographs where you managed to catch
that “decisive moment” that says it all.

.
.
Good hunting !

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Peter Dumont
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::: HISTORICAL CORNER :::famous photographers
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

.....or old masters who aren't as famous as they deserve to be!

post your examples of past masters for consideration and discussion

as an answer to this message to keep this thread organised.
-

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Peter Dumont
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::: TECHNICAL CORNER :::for tips and techniques
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

This is the branch of the thread to post questions and discussion
of technical topics related to street photography.

Post them as a reply to this message so they stay organized!
.

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Peter Dumont
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::: PORTRAITS CORNER ::: for street candid portraits
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

This is the branch of the thread to post street portraits .
and by "street" it means no snapshots of family members or acquaintances .

post them as a reply to this message so they stay organized

.

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jpr2
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HISTORICAL: the best of Brassai - part V
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

this is a fourth installment of Brassai's photographs of friends,
family and acquaintances, taken mostly just for private joy over
many decades, they have survived and are well preserved -
allowing a rare glimpse into their decades of exchanging ideas,
mutual influences, and their social milieu;
photos include very many of the most prominent figures of XX c.
arts and letters - due to their number it is just necessary to split
this anthology into several parts again,

enjoy :),
jpr2

PS and pls. notice that even as they are mostly what we'd now
call just a "casual snapshot", they are still impeccably composed
and without any visual clutter too!
.
.
.

Titre : Henry Miller à l'hôtel des Terrasses, à Paris
Date : 1931
0.240 m. x 0.180 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Aristide Maillol et son fils Lucien à Marly-le-Roi
Date : 1937
0.215 m. x 0.285 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : René Clair
Description : Cinéaste français, vers 1950
Date : 1950
0.195 m. x 0.255 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Marcel Carné à domicile, Cinéaste français, vers 1950
Date : 1950
0.205 m. x 0.260 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Henri Matisse et Gilberte Brassaï dans le jardin de la villa Le Rêve" à Vence
Date : 1946
0.180 m. x 0.275 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Marc Chagall et Julien Cain à Louveciennes
Date : 1963
0.290 m. x 0.230 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Le peintre Vincent Korda à l'hôtel des Terrasses, à Paris
Description : Vincent Korda est assis devant son secrétaire ouvert
Date : 1930
0.180 m. x 0.240 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Le peintre Hans Reichel à sa table de travail à l'hôtel des Terrasses
Description : Ami de Brassaï, vers 1931
Date : 1931
0.180 m. x 0.240 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Nusch et Paul Eluard
Date : 1945
0.220 m. x 0.290 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Pierre Reverdy sortant du bureau de la revue Minotaure
Description : Pierre Reverdy (1889-1960)
Date : 1932
0.225 m. x 0.165 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Exposition Brassaï, rue de la Boétie, avec au premier plan la sculpture "femme phallique"
Description : Au mur, accrochage des Transmutations et la tapisserie
Date : 1968
0.210 m. x 0.295 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Gilberte Robbe
Description : Jeune femme lisant allongée sur un divan
Date : 1931
0.155 m. x 0.230 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Gilberte Brassaï dans son traineau en Suède, Noël 1955
Date : Décembre 1955
0.250 m. x 0.235 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Déjeuner à Barcelone avec l'architecte J.-L. Sert, Madame Miro, Juan Miro, et Madame Sert
Description : de gauche à droite
Date : 1954
0.290 m. x 0.220 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Gilberte et Brassaï à l'hôtel Martinez, Cannes
Date : 1946
0.203 m. x 0.275 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Jacques Prévert et Claudie
Date : 1939
0.285 m. x 0.230 m.
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Fernand Léger dans son atelier, 86 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs
Date : 1952
0.396 m. x 0.298 m.
Localisation : Biot, musée national Fernand Léger

Titre : Henri Matisse debout contre un paravent et dessin à la craie
Date : 1939
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Giacometti à côté des bustes de son frère Diego
Date : 1965
Localisation : Collection particulière

Titre : Portrait de Gala
Description : 1932-1933
Localisation : Collection particulière

the previous part can be found here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1052&message=39220688

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Peter Dumont
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::: PORTRAITS CORNER ::: Billy is still waiting.....
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

Billy is still waiting.....to take DuckShots for a ride.

Date/Time 10-Sep-2011 14:53:50
Canon EOS 5D Mark II + 24L
Exposure Time 1/1000 sec
Aperture f/1.4
ISO Equivalent 100

-
Best,

http://www.pbase.com/peter_dumont

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jpr2
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PERFECT QUOTE: a bit more on SP according to Leuthard
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

"You should never forget that you shoot for yourself and
only for yourself. There is no other reason for you to
press that shutter button. If you at any time make a
photo for someone else you should stop and think about
it. You will start losing your personality as a Street
Photographer if you stop doing things because of criticism.
It's your style which makes you unique, not the amount
of people who like your work".

Thomas Leuthard

"Street Photography is the optical capture of someone's
personal view of an everyday moment in public. This
means that your personal view might be interpreted
differently by your viewers. This is not a bad thing
as such. Art is always something that people have
different opinions about. The problem starts when people
try to give you advice. Sure some amount of advice can
be useful, but often it can be confusing".

Thomas Leuthard

"You cannot learn Street Photography. You have to have
it inside your body. It's a feeling, an interest in
everyday human life, characteristic faces, interactions
between people and life in general. It's more a kind
of hunger to document life happening in the streets
than voyeurism. It's a kind of lifestyle".

Thomas Leuthard

"It's all about practicing and gaining the confidence to
know that most of the people will not care about you taking
their photo. It's the fear of the photographer who thinks
he is doing something bad. Shoot as it would be the most
normal thing in the world. Shoot as you would shoot your
best friend. Shoot as you would be asked to shoot any person.
It is all about the mindset when you shoot a candid portrait".

Thomas Leuthard

"For me it's my personal condition which is most relevant to
a good street experience. Often I either see a lot of things
or I don't. The longer the breaks of non-shooting are, the
better I feel on the street. Sometimes you have to take a
break or do something different in order to get back into
a good state of mind. If you have an overdose of Street
Photography it will blind you to new shots. But this doesn't
happen very often".

Thomas Leuthard
.
jpr2

the previous PQ can be found here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1052&message=39215574
(and then it is possible to just follow the chain)

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Peter Dumont
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:::::THIS WEEK's THEME:::::
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

Hi y'all !

As announced, the challenge for this weeks WSP weektheme is for you all is to get
in the David Attenburough-mode and capture the animals that have conquered
a place in our cities in our

-- hide signature --

STREETWISE BEASTS ---------------------------------------------

WSP weektheme.

.
.
.
Have fun !
.
.
.

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Peter Dumont
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:::::STREETWISE BEASTS::::: Birdie !
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

Birdie !

Date/Time 10-Sep-2011 14:59:02
EOS 5D Mark II + 24L
Exposure Time 1/1600 sec
Aperture f/1.8
ISO Equivalent 100

-
Best,

http://www.pbase.com/peter_dumont

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jpr2
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THEME: from my personal bestiary (or should I say aviary?)
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011
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xtoph
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Previously posted
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

But right on-theme:

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Peter Dumont
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Re: Previously posted
In reply to xtoph, Sep 11, 2011

Hi Chris,

I didn't know this picture.
It's both hilarious and endearing !

Do you have any extra information about this odd-couple ?
(what type of bird ? - does it join in with the song ? - what if the guy wants
to play the top string ? etc.

http://www.pbase.com/peter_dumont

xtoph wrote:

But right on-theme:

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Peter Dumont
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Re: THEME: from my personal bestiary (or should I say aviary?)
In reply to jpr2, Sep 11, 2011

jpr2 wrote:

the most streetwise crow I ever met:

Quercy, what is this crow doing, and why do you call it streetwise ?

Best,

http://www.pbase.com/peter_dumont

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jpr2
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Peter: the short answer: "interacting"...
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

...like you describe in your Intro (interacting with a photographer);
the long answer: I simply don't know. Due to their excellent vision,
which often enables a bird to see 180 degrees without any need to
turn their head, we might be tempted to assume that they pay no
attention to us, esp. if their safety distance is not being encroached
upon.

However, there are exceptions - this fellow was not only perfectly
aware of me, but also very inquisitive :). Obviously w wild crow, and
yet it was circling me pretty close, and constantly doing this intriguing
gesture. At first I've been assuming that it might blind on its right eye,
but no - as soon afterwards it did the same = like listening to some
earth tremors with its left cheek this time. And all along keeping very
close vigil on my dSLR and lens :), while I was trying to capture its
brethren crows in flight acrobatics (mating season),

jpr2

Peter Dumont wrote:

jpr2 wrote:

the most streetwise crow I ever met:

Quercy, what is this crow doing, and why do you call it streetwise ?

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MarcovM
Regular MemberPosts: 497
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Re: PERFECT QUOTE: contadicting quotes from Leuthard
In reply to jpr2, Sep 11, 2011

Generally a B&W photo is more appealing than a colored one. Street Photography must be in B&W to touch people's heart. It always has and it always will be. A photo in color cannot have as much soul as a B&W one - that is a fact. The average viewer has this expectation and you cannot change this. Although I often like colored street shots, the audience has a much different attitude.

VS

Don’t listen to others…

Street Photography is the optical capture of someone’s personal view of aneveryday moment in public. This means that your personal view might be in-terpreted differently by your viewers. This is not a bad thing as such. Art is al-ways something that people have different opinions about. The problem starts when people try to give you advice. Sure some amount of advice can be useful but often it can be confusing.

You should have a plan, an idea and a personal point of view. This personal view you should want to put into your photography. The better you can achieve this goal the easier it gets for attaining your own style. The more you listen to other people, the more you will be distracted from this goal and your path will not go straight. You have to know that you cannot please the World and that not everyone will like your work.

personal note of critique:

the amount of confident of Thomas does not match his work, both of his writing and photography are common and do not witness of personality or talent.

jpr2 wrote:

"You should never forget that you shoot for yourself and
only for yourself. There is no other reason for you to
press that shutter button. If you at any time make a
photo for someone else you should stop and think about
it. You will start losing your personality as a Street
Photographer if you stop doing things because of criticism.
It's your style which makes you unique, not the amount
of people who like your work".

Thomas Leuthard

"Street Photography is the optical capture of someone's
personal view of an everyday moment in public. This
means that your personal view might be interpreted
differently by your viewers. This is not a bad thing
as such. Art is always something that people have
different opinions about. The problem starts when people
try to give you advice. Sure some amount of advice can
be useful, but often it can be confusing".

Thomas Leuthard

"You cannot learn Street Photography. You have to have
it inside your body. It's a feeling, an interest in
everyday human life, characteristic faces, interactions
between people and life in general. It's more a kind
of hunger to document life happening in the streets
than voyeurism. It's a kind of lifestyle".

Thomas Leuthard

"It's all about practicing and gaining the confidence to
know that most of the people will not care about you taking
their photo. It's the fear of the photographer who thinks
he is doing something bad. Shoot as it would be the most
normal thing in the world. Shoot as you would shoot your
best friend. Shoot as you would be asked to shoot any person.
It is all about the mindset when you shoot a candid portrait".

Thomas Leuthard

"For me it's my personal condition which is most relevant to
a good street experience. Often I either see a lot of things
or I don't. The longer the breaks of non-shooting are, the
better I feel on the street. Sometimes you have to take a
break or do something different in order to get back into
a good state of mind. If you have an overdose of Street
Photography it will blind you to new shots. But this doesn't
happen very often".

Thomas Leuthard
.
jpr2

the previous PQ can be found here:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1052&message=39215574
(and then it is possible to just follow the chain)

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jpr2
Forum ProPosts: 13,474
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Marco: you're keen to pounce
In reply to MarcovM, Sep 11, 2011

MarcovM wrote:

personal note of critique:

the amount of confident of Thomas does not match his work, both of his writing and photography are common and do not witness of personality or talent.

indeed there seem to be some gaps btw. the level which esp.
his I-st book's images might lead us to expect, and the
everyday produce:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/thomasleuthard/random/
almost as if he doesn't heed his own advice of rejecting all but the
very best :), but then this gap is not huge, and many, very
many can easily learn from what is being shown (mistakes included),

jpr2
--
~
street candids (non-interactive):
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/qmusaget/sets/72157609618638319/
music and dance:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/qmusaget/sets/72157600341265280/
B&W:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/qmusaget/sets/72157623306407882/
wildlife & macro:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/qmusaget/sets/72157600341377106/
interactive street:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/qmusaget/sets/72157623181919323/

Comments and critique are always welcome!
~

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Still Young
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Re: :::::THIS WEEK's THEME:::::
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

hi

You know that I like to take pictures of black dressed subjects. So, I continue.

Poor nestling (sparrow) out of nest. No chance.
Taken with a macro lens [tamron 90] thus good details.

still

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Still Young
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Re: :::::Decisive moment: for when it all comes together:::::
In reply to Peter Dumont, Sep 11, 2011

watch & watch

inside…
[but I can’t decide]

still

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Peter Dumont
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Re: Peter: the short answer: "interacting"...
In reply to jpr2, Sep 11, 2011

My son tells me crows are very intelligent animals.
-
Best,

http://www.pbase.com/peter_dumont

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