Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II on CIS

Started Jun 26, 2010 | Discussions
William Pesch
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Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II on CIS
Jun 26, 2010

I attended a showing of Canon products at my local camera store and what interested me was the Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II printer.

The large prints looked fantastic.

Questions are: so much is said for the Epson printers but not much for the better Canon printers, how come? Are not the Canon printers as good for print quality? Are its mechanics as good? Are the CIS systems as reliable as those for the Epsons? Do you think the Canon is a good candidate for the CIS system?

This model is a dye ink printer, so clogging should not be a problem? Is Canon's Pixma 9500 pigment printer less clogging than the Epson's?

Any thoughts on these or other questions I did not bring up?

Thank you
--
Gritty

Apotheker
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Re: Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II on CIS
In reply to William Pesch, Jun 26, 2010

I strongly advise you not to use a CISS on Canon printers. The particular design of these printers (including the latest HP with the similar separate printhead + 364 inkttanks) will sooner or later cause ink flow problems. The problem is the rubber grommet, on which the cartridges rest on the printhead, which will cause air to be sucked into the printhead with the slightest pull from the tubing system on the cartridge. This is inevitable when the printhead travels from left to right during printing.

Another reason is the design of the inkttanks. Good performing Canon CISS cartridges do have a sponge inside them, to control the ink flow, but the same sponge will deteriorate and will eventually disintegrate causing small spongy particles to travel into the printhead, which will cause incurable clogs unlike dissolvable ink clogs, when some ink had dried up inside the printhead: this is particular true for non-OEM cartridges with a inferior sponge material and using only a monobloc sponge. One could try the "spongeless" CISS cartridges, but the ink flow of these cartridges with multiple compartments, is far inferior the sponge based cartridges (and especially the double density sponge design of original Canon cartridges). But then: you will still have the problem with the cartridge and the rubber grommet of the printhead: remember the necessity of the air sealed contact between ink tank and printhead and the slightest imbalance causing air to be sucked through the slightest opening of the grommet ?

Using the german durchstich method, a CLI-8 resetter and a syringe with 2 inch needle the cartridges are refilled and reset in less than a minute when ink run out. The double density of the original Canon cartridges is far superior to any aftermarket cartridge in inkflow towards the printhead. This will guarantee evenly and consistent inkflow when the printer will demand it, when a large area of the same colour is to be printed.

CISS systems can be much more easily adopted into Epson printers and will work much more reliable, because of its intricate design of the piezo printhead and the cartridges. The possibility of using pigment ink to achieve archival prints with any Epson printer -due to its piezographic printhead- is a great advantage. Do not try this in Canon printers (accept for the black text cartridge).

Something you should also take into account when choosing the archival pigment inks: most CISS systems use a system where the ink travels from underneath the tank into the tubing system. With this system you will risk clogging when the CISS is not used for a long time. The pigment particles tend to precipitate, exactly downwards into the exit hole, through which the ink is supposed to travel into the tubing system. Therefore: the best CISS systems are the ones consisting of a bottle where the tubing is stucked from above through the lid. The ink is then sucked like a straw by the printer and these systems might look quite rudimentary, but are by far superior in performance than the ones most CISS sellers are advertising. Any possible precipitation of pigment will not cause the system to clog. Sometimes the simplest design is the best. Both Inkrepublic.com and Efillink.com incorporate this simple "bottle and straw" design. Does it look flashy and advanced ? No, but it works much more reliable when combined with pigment ink.
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Crazy about printing, profiling and refilling printer cartridges

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William Pesch
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Re: Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II on CIS
In reply to Apotheker, Jun 26, 2010

Apotheker,

Thank you for the insights of Canon CISS potential problems.

What you don't know can certainly cause problems that you were not expecting.

So, your recommendation is, if one is to get this Canon printer, is to refill the cartridge a few times (before the sponge goes) and then purchase a new cartridge and start this process over again.

The Canon Pro 9000 Mark ll is a dye based ink printer. Will any of the major CISS manufacturer's inks be okay?

Or, should I buy an Epson 1400 dye based printer and use a CISS system with it.

Is the dye type ink subject to the particle settlements as you noted for the pigments type ink? If not, then a CISS system that supplies ink from tubes on the bottom of the reservoir bottles will be okay?

Again,

Thank you for your responses
--
Gritty

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Apotheker
Regular MemberPosts: 418
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Re: Canon PIXMA Pro9000 Mark II on CIS
In reply to William Pesch, Jun 27, 2010

William Pesch wrote:

Apotheker,

Thank you for the insights of Canon CISS potential problems.

What you don't know can certainly cause problems that you were not expecting.

So, your recommendation is, if one is to get this Canon printer, is to refill the cartridge a few times (before the sponge goes) and then purchase a new cartridge and start this process over again.

The Canon Pro 9000 Mark ll is a dye based ink printer. Will any of the major CISS manufacturer's inks be okay?

Or, should I buy an Epson 1400 dye based printer and use a CISS system with it.

Is the dye type ink subject to the particle settlements as you noted for the pigments type ink? If not, then a CISS system that supplies ink from tubes on the bottom of the reservoir bottles will be okay?

Again,

Thank you for your responses
--
Gritty

The Canon CLi-8 cartridges can be refilled many times (up to 15-20 times) without the slightest flow problems and done in a proper way and with the right type of refill ink (Hobbicolors UW-8, Image Specialists CLI-8, OCS). At the nifty-stuff.com website you will get the right information how to refill (german durchstich refill method) and how to purge these cartridges when ink flow is significantly diminished after some time.

If you want CISS, then the Epson 1400 is way better and will function much more reliable than a CISS with the Canon Pro 9000 cartridge and you can even convert to pigment ink to achieve archival prints. I made a printing video at youtube.com with my new Epson 1400 converted to pigment ink CISS and also important: with a external waste ink bottle to redirect the waste ink from the internals (which will stay clean much longer) to this particular waste ink bottle:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKgp3lQ2Rcc

Please look at the comment about this CISS and usage. It might give you some clues, about some practival tips for using pigment inks using this printer.

Dye inks can be used in a CISS where the ink tubing is at the bottom of the external tanks without any problems, because dye ink is a true solution, whether pigment is a dispersed micro-suspension of particles. So no risk of flow problems when particles settle down at the bottom over time.

I have noticed the Epson 1400 prints even better than my previous Canon i9950 (which is the forerunner of the Canon Pro 9000: same printhead, same 8 colours, same 4800x2400@2 pl printing dpi). Print speed is about the same.

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Crazy about printing, profiling and refilling printer cartridges

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