Video glasses for previewing images?

Started Jul 6, 2009 | Discussions
Lou Gonzalez
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Video glasses for previewing images?
Jul 6, 2009

Hello,

For years I've been intrigued with the thought of viewing videos or images via "video glasses". I see many of these on the market now and they're getting cheaper and cheaper. I often have a need to view my images on the go. I don't often have the luxury of toting my laptop everywhere to view larger sized previews to check for focus etc. Yeah sure I can chimp my images and zoom in on the LCD but it's just not the same.

Wondering if anybody is using video glasses of some type to review camera images. If so, would love to know how it's working out and whether you'd recommend a certain type.

Thanks,
--
Lou

http://www.lifesharephoto.com

Skip M
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Ok, I gotta ask...
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 6, 2009

Am I just techologically backward, or are these thing rare? I've never heard of them, much less seen them. Where can I find them? It presents an interesting scenario...
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Skip M
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Lou Gonzalez
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Re: Ok, I gotta ask...
In reply to Skip M, Jul 6, 2009

Just google "video glasses". There are many different models. Lots of people use them in conjuction with ipod video players, personal media players, etc.
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http://www.lifesharephoto.com

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bdjohns1
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Not for critical work
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 8, 2009

They're usually pretty low-res. Basically analog TV resolution at best.

You could maybe use them for very basic culling of images, but I wouldn't do any critical image evaluation with them.

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Suntan
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Re: Not for critical work
In reply to bdjohns1, Jul 8, 2009

As said above, the quality of the displays are not the greatest. Unless these things have improved radically in the last year or so, you will be better served just bringing a towel to throw over your head to block the sunlight as you use the LCD on the back of the camera to review the pictures.

-Suntan

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k_strecker
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Re: Video glasses for previewing images?
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 8, 2009

HAHAAA

the first person to walk around with Video Goggles, attatched to their DSLR, using Live View to compose and take images . . . gets a cookie.

That'd be quite an experiment actually. What if you only saw through the eyes of your camera for an entire shoot. . .

With the only potential drawbacks of tripping over things and acute motion sickness . . . it'd be an interesting project. I'm gonna start writing some grants

And isn't standard Def TV resolution still superior to the 1DsMkIII's lcd screen?

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riddell
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Technology for technologies sake
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 8, 2009

Sounds like you are making some sad desperate attempt to be 'cool' and show off to your peers than making any professional decesions.

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Ron Kruger
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Re: Technology for technologies sake
In reply to riddell, Jul 8, 2009

I never trust the LCD for editing images, unless they are obviously soft when magnified or the compostion is not what I wanted. Anything that looks like it might work stays until I can get it on the computer (calibrated) screen and really blow it up.

It pays, however, to read through these threads. The biggest problem with LCD screen is you can't see them in full light. I've debated about buying a viewer screen that blocks the sun and uses a lope, but they're expensive, so I've been trying to figure out a way to make one myself.

The someone piped up with the most simple solution. "Just throw a towl over your head and the camera." Man--why didn't I think of that?
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Suntan
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Re: Technology for technologies sake
In reply to Ron Kruger, Jul 8, 2009

Don’t feel too bad. The notion of shrouding the back of the camera with a towel is a relatively new occurrence in the camera industry…

-Suntan

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Lou Gonzalez
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Re: Technology for technologies sake
In reply to riddell, Jul 8, 2009

To clarify, i would never use this on a shoot or out in the field. I could however see using something like this while flying home from a job on a plane. It was make for easy review while I have time. I can also see using this in a remote are where I couldnt plug a laptop in a wall. That's where I was coming from when I brought up this thread. I don't enjoy toting my laptop everywhere just to see larger sizes of my images.

I do review my images in camera via my LCD, but I'm trying to find a quick portable way to review my images without the need for laptop.

This is not about looking cool.
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Curtis Clegg
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Re: Technology for technologies sake
In reply to Ron Kruger, Jul 8, 2009

Ron take a look at the "Pocket Video Monitor":
http://www.sjmediasystem.com/psvm-1.html

I have used one for a few years when doing elevated photography with a Sony digicam. The resolution is pretty low and the display is grayscale, but it's a great tool for framing remotely. It has a "press and hold" switch to operate, so it's not on all the time and you can get a lot of use out of a single set of AAA batteries.

I can see something like this being useful to photojournalists who routinely take photos at arm's length or at odd angles, especially with the new breed of DSLRs that have live viewing.

Ron Kruger wrote:

It pays, however, to read through these threads. The biggest problem with LCD screen is you can't see them in full light. I've debated about buying a viewer screen that blocks the sun and uses a lope, but they're expensive, so I've been trying to figure out a way to make one myself.

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Curtis Clegg

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pptphoto
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Personally,
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 8, 2009

I only use them for driving.

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MusicDoctorDJ
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Re: Video glasses for previewing images?
In reply to Lou Gonzalez, Jul 9, 2009

We sell them at the camera store . . .

I tried them hooked up to a live view DSLR . . . photos looked worse than on the camera's LCD.

Don't bother . . . doesn't really bring that much (if any) advantage to the table.

And a waste of $300 if that is the only intended use for them.

They are great for watching movies as long as you aren't driving.

However, I prefer the big screen for my movie viewing.

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J. D.
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backstein
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Re: Video glasses for previewing images?
In reply to k_strecker, Jul 9, 2009

k_strecker wrote:

HAHAAA

the first person to walk around with Video Goggles, attatched to their DSLR, using Live View to compose and take images . . . gets a cookie.

i often thought about that but in a different way... it would be nice to have googles that keep the original view through ones eyes but add a frameline with the field of view of the camera...

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backstein.deviantart.com

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Lou Gonzalez
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Re: Video glasses for previewing images?
In reply to MusicDoctorDJ, Jul 9, 2009

Good info. Maybe someday they will be good enough.
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Knezz
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Re: Not for critical work
In reply to bdjohns1, Jul 10, 2009

bdjohns1 wrote:

They're usually pretty low-res. Basically analog TV resolution at best.

You could maybe use them for very basic culling of images, but I wouldn't do any critical image evaluation with them.

1024x768 HD Resolution
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K. Nezz

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Ken Phillips
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1024 x 768 is NOT an HD standard ...
In reply to Knezz, Jul 10, 2009

... but it may be good enough to see that you got what you wanted.
Wireless and a big monitor works for me.
KP
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