C-22 Film processing..................

Started Apr 20, 2009 | Discussions
Ralph Ramirez
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C-22 Film processing..................
Apr 20, 2009
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I just found an old family camera that contained exposed film still in the camera. We cannot identify the owner of the camera other than it had to belong to someone in our family. Unfortunately, I left the camera and just brought the film so can't identify the camera but that really doesn't matter in regards to my question. The film is stamped "Kodacolor-X Color Negative 120 Film". Also stamped on the film is "120 Film -- Color Proc c-22". Took it to a local one hour film processing at Walmart but they couldn't/wouldn't process the film. Can someone help in in locating a film processing business where I can have this film processed and printed. I have no idea what to expect but am hoping it is of someone in our family which could have great sentimental value.

Thanks for any help you may provide. I live in Petaluma CA, perhaps something nearby would be great.

Ralph.........

nickoly
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Re: C-22 Film processing..................
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 20, 2009

Ralph Ramirez wrote:

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"120 Film -- Color Proc c-22". Took it to a local one hour
film processing at Walmart but they couldn't/wouldn't process the
film.

They probably didn't want to know because it is 120 film and C-22 process.

C-22 is an old process, superceded by C-41, probably about thirty years ago or more. I don't know what the difference is.

You may find a lab that can do it if you trawl the Internet. If you do, you can be pretty sure they will do 120 rollfilm. It could be expensive and then disappointing. It could also yield some treasure.

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Amypics
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Re: C-22 Film processing..................
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 20, 2009
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Leonard Migliore
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If you do find a C-22 processor
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 20, 2009

don't expect decent images; those pictures were shot at least 30 years ago and latent images don't like to wait that long.

But something could still be there. There should be a couple of labs that will do it.
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Ralph Ramirez
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Thank You ALL for your suggestions/info...............
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 20, 2009
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Thank you very much for your prompt replies. I will check out those links and google local print shops to see what I come up with. I know the film is really old so I don't have high hopes but I will give it a try and see what I get.

Thanks again.................Ralph

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Barrie Davis
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Whatever you do, Ralph....
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 20, 2009

.... DO NOT allow anyone to attempt to put your C-22 film through a C-41 process!!

This is important!

The emulsion will melt because the temperature is higher in the more modern process. This will not only destroy anything on your film, but the resulting gelatin "goo" floating off the film base will contaminate the processing baths, the transport mechanism of the process machine...

.... and anybody else's film that happens to be in there at the same time!!

Other than that, I wish you good luck in finding a source of C-22 somewhere on the planet! If and when the pictures are revealed, may there be something worthwhile for you to marvel over.
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Regards,
Baz

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Ralph Ramirez
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Re: Whatever you do, Ralph....
In reply to Barrie Davis, Apr 20, 2009

Barrie Davis wrote:

.... DO NOT allow anyone to attempt to put your C-22 film through a
C-41 process!!

This is important!

The emulsion will melt because the temperature is higher in the more
modern process. This will not only destroy anything on your film, but
the resulting gelatin "goo" floating off the film base will
contaminate the processing baths, the transport mechanism of the
process machine...

.... and anybody else's film that happens to be in there at the same
time!!

Other than that, I wish you good luck in finding a source of C-22
somewhere on the planet! If and when the pictures are revealed, may
there be something worthwhile for you to marvel over.
--
Regards,
Baz

Thanks Baz, I will make sure it is processed through the C-22 method. Thanks for the heads up...............Ralph

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mandm
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How long will the Latent Image last?
In reply to Leonard Migliore, Apr 20, 2009

Back in the early 1990's one of the photo magazines ran an article about one of their staff members going to France to visit relatives. He was given an old camera that still had film in it. When he got back to the USA he had the film developed, and they printed 2 of the images in the magazine, they were good images. The film was Kodak B&W and that will hold the latent image longer than color film will, if stored properly. The images were of French troops in the trenches from World War I, around 1917. As amazing as it was that the B&W films latent image was still good, it is more amazing that in the 75 years after the pictures were taken, nobody ever used the camera or opened the camera back that would have destroyed most of the images.
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Kerry D.
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Old C-22 process history
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 21, 2009

Hi. I've been around the block for years and have a few observations...all from memory from years ago.

Yes, C-22 is old incompatable process for color negative film that was discontinued years ago (1970s?). The older films had a thick heavy orange mask. As people were becoming more environmentally conscious during the 70s, it was time for a change. Kodak started with the film itself. The old Kodacolor-X films as well as the professional CPS-120 films became VPS-120 and Kodacolor-II. The heavy orange mask was gone replaced by a much lighter tint. It made the films much easier to print in the darkroom with far less exppsure times. Grain improved and I believe the film base was thinner too.

On the processing end, the process was simplified. Instead of the hugely long and "cold" (68 degrees?) processing times, the new C-41 process offered processing times of 100 degrees which greatly shortened the time in chemicals and soon became part of the "1-hour process" for labs. Also, the chemicals were reformulated to be less caustic and environmentally friendly. I remember at the time we were all amazed that film could be processed and printed in an hours time!

Here in the US, I recall using what was known to become the Rocky Mountain photo lab to process the leftover C-22 film. Don't trust ANY of it to any local photofinisher as they simply are not running C-22. Probably their C-41 chemicals aren't much better...but the two processes are as different as a cassette tape and an 8-track. Or Beta and VHS.

I'm sure theres a silver-haired Kodak guy out there who knows all this from the inside. I'm just trying to remember this off the top of my head from 30+ years ago. Color film does not hold up as well as black & white. It will probably be expensive to develop C-22 film now but if you want to do it...there is no alternative.

Good Luck - its worth a shot!

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Ralph Ramirez
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Re: Old C-22 process history
In reply to Kerry D., Apr 21, 2009

Kerry D. wrote:

Hi. I've been around the block for years and have a few
observations...all from memory from years ago.

Yes, C-22 is old incompatable process for color negative film that
was discontinued years ago (1970s?). The older films had a thick
heavy orange mask. As people were becoming more environmentally
conscious during the 70s, it was time for a change. Kodak started
with the film itself. The old Kodacolor-X films as well as the
professional CPS-120 films became VPS-120 and Kodacolor-II. The
heavy orange mask was gone replaced by a much lighter tint. It made
the films much easier to print in the darkroom with far less exppsure
times. Grain improved and I believe the film base was thinner too.
On the processing end, the process was simplified. Instead of the
hugely long and "cold" (68 degrees?) processing times, the new C-41
process offered processing times of 100 degrees which greatly
shortened the time in chemicals and soon became part of the "1-hour
process" for labs. Also, the chemicals were reformulated to be less
caustic and environmentally friendly. I remember at the time we were
all amazed that film could be processed and printed in an hours time!

Here in the US, I recall using what was known to become the Rocky
Mountain photo lab to process the leftover C-22 film. Don't trust
ANY of it to any local photofinisher as they simply are not running
C-22. Probably their C-41 chemicals aren't much better...but the two
processes are as different as a cassette tape and an 8-track. Or
Beta and VHS.

I'm sure theres a silver-haired Kodak guy out there who knows all
this from the inside. I'm just trying to remember this off the top
of my head from 30+ years ago. Color film does not hold up as well
as black & white. It will probably be expensive to develop C-22 film
now but if you want to do it...there is no alternative.

Good Luck - its worth a shot!

Hi Kerry, thanks for all that information, I found it to be very interesting. I have checked several processing sites and am thinking of using Film Rescue International. They charge $19 for 20-27 exposure roll plus $8 shipping and .65 cents per image copied to a CD. Since I would like to PP any possible images CD would be perfect. They process C22 film monthly which I don't mind the wait. I also checked into Rocky Mountain File Laboratory and they charge $36.50 plus $6 shipping. $42.50 vs $27 is not a major difference but their wait time is 6 months to a year, too long for me. Unless someone comes up with a better choice between now and next week I will use Film Rescue International.

Thanks again Kerry, very interesting information you provided................Ralph

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Ralph Ramirez
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Thanks Amy, I checked all your links, see my posting to Kerry.....nt
In reply to Amypics, Apr 21, 2009
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Kerry D.
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Thanks Ralph
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Apr 22, 2009

Thanks Ralph for your kind words. I think you're taking the right course.

Good Luck!
Kerry D.

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filmrescue
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Re: Old C-22 process history
In reply to Ralph Ramirez, Jun 21, 2009

Thank for you observations Ralph. Also worth mentioning is that if you send your film to us and it is blank there is no charge on the order.

Your film was manufactured from 1963 to 74 and is one of the few very old color films that is still developed into color. That said the color shift is normally so severe that we must isolate the blue sensitive dye layer and work primarily from it meaning that most likely you will end up with B&W images. You can insist on color but it is normally not the best idea. Our success with properly exposed Kodacolor-x roll film is nearly 100% with the images often still of very good quality. Of all of the old color film that we get in this is the best one you could have.

thanks
Film Rescue International

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Leswick
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Re: Old C-22 process history
In reply to filmrescue, Jun 21, 2009

My suggestion is to contact pro photo shops in SF and see if they can't steer you

to a place locally that performs such process. Some of these old codgers will have info that might surprise you. Good luck.

Leswick

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Ralph Ramirez
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Re: Old C-22 process history
In reply to filmrescue, Jun 23, 2009

filmrescue wrote:

Thank for you observations Ralph. Also worth mentioning is that if
you send your film to us and it is blank there is no charge on the
order.

Your film was manufactured from 1963 to 74 and is one of the few very
old color films that is still developed into color. That said the
color shift is normally so severe that we must isolate the blue
sensitive dye layer and work primarily from it meaning that most
likely you will end up with B&W images. You can insist on color but
it is normally not the best idea. Our success with properly exposed
Kodacolor-x roll film is nearly 100% with the images often still of
very good quality. Of all of the old color film that we get in this
is the best one you could have.

thanks
Film Rescue International

Thanks for your response. I have been busy lately and haven't sent you my film but I intend to do so this week or next. Thanks for your input............Ralph

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