How to scan 110 and 126 film

Started Oct 1, 2005 | Discussions
eshropshire
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How to scan 110 and 126 film
Oct 1, 2005

Just wondering if anyone has had any success in scanning this size of film. I have a Nikon V ED that does a great job on slides and an Epson 3170 that does a good job on prints. Has anyone found a way to scan these odd size negatives? I don't expect fantastic scans from the 110s but I would like to digitize them if possible.

Any ideas or suggestions for sources would be helpful.

Thanks
--
Ed
http://www.cbrycelea.com/photos/

Gammu
Regular MemberPosts: 274
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Re: How to scan 110 and 126 film
In reply to eshropshire, Oct 1, 2005

Your flatbed has a negative holder doesn't it? Probably the least expensive way would be to get a really thin piece of glass and cut two rectangles that would fit in the holder, then sandwich the 110 negative between them and set the sandwich in the holder resting on the scanners flat bed. Then scan it as a regular 35mm.

The glass should be narrower than a strip of 35mm film so it fits through the holder and doesn't sit on it.

Additionally, make sure you use emery cloth on the edges of the glass so that it's smooth and doesn't scratch the glass scanner bed. You should probably even use black electrical tape on the bottom edges so you don't have glass-to-glass contact. And make sure everything is completely clean so you don't scratch the negative or anything else.

With a little luck, this will put the 110 negative at roughly the same distance from the scanning head as a 35mm negative in the carrier.

If this assembly doesn't focus well or it's too thick, you could try putting the negative directly on the scanner bed and just put one piece of glass over it to flatten it. Again, make sure stuff is clean.

You might also find custom 110/126 holders somewhere, if you search for them.

Good luck.

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JoePhoto
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you are aware that negative scans are not good ???
In reply to Gammu, Oct 1, 2005

I am sure you are aware that 35mm scans from any flatbed scanner is barely acceptable for "amateur" purposes ... and not at all for professional purposes.

Scans from 110 will be much, much worse.

The first problem is the lower resolution of flatbeds ... but the second is GAMMA.

I would purchase or RENT a 4000 dpi "film" scanner, (or 8000dpi) .... and then "tape" the 110 inside the 35mm holder.

And make sure your 110 negatives are "clean" .... dust/scratches of course will be even worse and more noticable than they are for 35mm.

Gammu wrote:

Your flatbed has a negative holder doesn't it? Probably the least
expensive way would be to get a really thin piece of glass and cut
two rectangles that would fit in the holder, then sandwich the 110
negative between them and set the sandwich in the holder resting on
the scanners flat bed. Then scan it as a regular 35mm.

The glass should be narrower than a strip of 35mm film so it fits
through the holder and doesn't sit on it.

Additionally, make sure you use emery cloth on the edges of the
glass so that it's smooth and doesn't scratch the glass scanner
bed. You should probably even use black electrical tape on the
bottom edges so you don't have glass-to-glass contact. And make
sure everything is completely clean so you don't scratch the
negative or anything else.

With a little luck, this will put the 110 negative at roughly the
same distance from the scanning head as a 35mm negative in the
carrier.

If this assembly doesn't focus well or it's too thick, you could
try putting the negative directly on the scanner bed and just put
one piece of glass over it to flatten it. Again, make sure stuff
is clean.

You might also find custom 110/126 holders somewhere, if you search
for them.

Good luck.

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Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK --- and FORGET to START Again ??? )

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LesDMess
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,311
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Buy a FH3 film holder . . .
In reply to eshropshire, Oct 1, 2005

. . . and you can slip the 110 film in it if you have at least 4 frames per strip. I've done it on my Coolscan 5000 and although it is very clumsy it works. I get 2600 X 2000 pixels out of it and it scans in under 20 seconds each.

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Gammu
Regular MemberPosts: 274
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Re: you are aware that negative scans are not good ???
In reply to JoePhoto, Oct 1, 2005

JoePhoto wrote:

I am sure you are aware that 35mm scans from any flatbed scanner is
barely acceptable for "amateur" purposes ... and not at all for
professional purposes.

Scans from 110 will be much, much worse.

The first problem is the lower resolution of flatbeds ... but the
second is GAMMA.

I would purchase or RENT a 4000 dpi "film" scanner, (or 8000dpi)
.... and then "tape" the 110 inside the 35mm holder.

And make sure your 110 negatives are "clean" .... dust/scratches of
course will be even worse and more noticable than they are for 35mm.

I wouldn't begin to suggest that a consumer level flatbed would produce pro quality results, but this is 110 we're talking about here. For maybe $5-$10 he could give my experiment a try with the equipment he already has, and see if the results are acceptable to him. If not, no big loss. And besides, once he has the glassplates, he can do other interesting things with them, like scan pressed garden fairys: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1857933362/qid=1128156200/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/103-9501593-7108604?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

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Joakim Engerstam
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Re: How to scan 110 and 126 film
In reply to eshropshire, Oct 1, 2005

I scanned some 110 negatives on my Minolta Scan Dual III with the regular film holder. Scanning one frame at a time and repositioning the film in the holder. The problem is to get the film flat but the results were good.

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Joakim Engerstam

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Erik Magnuson
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Re: Buy a FH3 film holder . . .
In reply to LesDMess, Oct 1, 2005

I've also done this with my Coolscan IV. 126 (and 828) may get cropped a bit but this rarely matters much. For 110, I think it works better if you use a paper or film "mask" to reduce the amount of stray light coming around the negative including through the sprocket holes. Such a mask can also help to hold the film flatter. If you have 110 slides in the small mount, use old 35mm slide mount and an Xacto to make an adapter.

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Erik

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LesDMess
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Re: Buy a FH3 film holder . . .
In reply to Erik Magnuson, Oct 1, 2005

The new Coolscans - V, 5000 & 9000, don't have the DOF issues that folks were complaining about in the past versions.
It isn't elegant but it will produce the best quality scans possible.

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jpp
jpp
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Re: you are aware that negative scans are not good ???
In reply to JoePhoto, Oct 1, 2005

Check this site:
http://www.photo-i.co.uk/
go to the Epson 4870 review, page 7, 35mm scanning.

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Barrie Davis
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Have prints made and scan those? [nt]
In reply to Joakim Engerstam, Oct 1, 2005

no text

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