Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami

Started 3 months ago | Discussions thread
TheChefs
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Re: Photographs as tengible objects - lessons learned in Japanese tsunami
In reply to bford, 3 months ago

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

bford wrote:

TheChefs wrote:

Well, the article says everything:

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/photo_rescue/10.html

Good article but it's odd that they give the impression that storage cards couldn't have their images recovered. Here's the quote.

"After the tsunami, many of the memory cards and computers weren't salvaged, and even if they were, there was no way to retrieve the photographs from the damaged hard disk; they were erased completely."

Storage cards are quite resistant to water damage. Here is information about that from SanDisk.

http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4687/~/sandisk-cards-environmental-tolerance-(waterproof,-temperature,-magnetic-and

it's to fujifilm's benefit to get more people to print their photos, and that's fine, but they should be more clear about the realities of the durability of most storage cards so that people at least try and recover images from them. I love prints myself and agree with Fujifilm when they say people should print more , but what we really need is even more durable storage cards and devices. That's the key.

They make another odd statement in this quote.

"In the current era, where technology moves at an unfathomable speed, it is important to retrieve photographic images from the rapid flow of digital data."

They are wrong. Advancements from one storage system to another is actually quite slow. All the mediums used for image storage since the meaningful start of digital photography are still in use today or easily readable. The only real weak link in digital image storage is man's laziness to keep track of such images and then to later transfer them to easier to manage and/or more durable mediums, such as going from DVDs to Blu-Ray or from many cards or drives to fewer cards or drives. The idea of thinking that one needs to photograph anything and everything doesn't help either.

DVDs suffer from bit rot, I can't read a DVD I burnt 2 years ago, because it rotted away...

All my DVDs from 10 years ago are still readable. I've never had an issue with them. Now you have the really awesome MDisc, which just recently introduced a Blu-Ray version. MDisc is by far the most archivable digital storage medium ever created. 1000 year life.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bQENbP8npsw

From sandisk, the page states in red that it's in 1m of water. The forces in Tsunami would have exceeded that by quiet large margin, not to mention dirt and mechanical abuse.

They don't test their cards in washing machines either and yet storage cards commonly survive multiple washings and brutal high g force spinnings in washing machines.

Put down your SD card on ground and jump on it few times, see what happens. Do the same with piece of paper.

of course what is being discussed is water damage, not something being crushed. take a handful of photographs and put them in a washing machine cycle and then a dryer cycle. then do the same thing with a storage card. which one is more likely to survive? which one comes close to the tsumani scenario?

Well, when watching the videos of houses being swept away and everything just falling apart. I'm not sure who would dry photos in a dryer... just let them hang and dry like in the link.

you're missing the point.

How? I'm not speculating about washing machines and tsunamis, I'm reporting from the first link of what actually has happened in real life.

You have to remember, 99% of common people are not camera geeks and don't care about this things. They will use what is cheapest or what sales man makes the biggest margin on. That's the items that have perished.

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