Lightroom 5 & A7r bug.

Started 7 months ago | Discussions thread
rrr_hhh
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Re: Lightroom 5 & A7r bug.
In reply to johtuomi, 7 months ago

This behaviour is not new to LR5. I has been introduced with process 2012, may be you never noticed it because you never had those huge contrast from one picture of the composite to another.

Here is what Michael Frye says about the new process 2012 :

Image-Adaptive Behavior
All six Basic panel Tone controls are now imageadaptive.That is, they auto-adjust their behavior
internally based on image content. (...) I’ll describe in detail how each of the six tools work, but there are two image-adaptive behaviors that can be more obvious than others and sometimes disconcerting to those who are used to older versions of Lightroom, so I’ll discuss them here: automatic highlight recovery and automatically adjusted black points.

Automatic Highlight Recovery
With Raw files, it’s possible to recover detail in seemingly overexposed highlights, as long as they’re not too overexposed. In earlier versions of Lightroom this was done with the Recovery tool. In Lightroom 4 and 5, highlight recovery is automatic. When you view a just-imported image in the 2012 process, the highlights have already been recovered, if possible (and if necessary).

Automatic Black Point
On the other end of the tonal scale, if an image has large amounts of pure black, the new process automatically adjusts the black point to increase shadow detail. Here’s a comparison showing an image in the 2010 process (Lightroom 3) at Adobe’s default settings (C) that has substantial areas of black (shown in blue), alongside the same image at the default settings in the 2012 process (Lightroom 4 and 5) (D), where you can see that the amount of black has been reduced automatically.

(This is an extract from his E-book :http://www.michaelfrye.com/landscape-photography-blog/landscapes-in-lightroom-5/ p. 11-12).

and you may find free information about that on his blog

That said, I have made several panos recently, using my A7r and didn't encounter that problem, but I didn't make vertical pano, only horizontal pano, where it is easier to have highlights in the sky and shadows near the ground. To meter the light, depending on the situation, I make a compromise between the main point of interest in the pano (which I want well exposed) and try to pick a frame where there are both highlights and shadows and which I want to render in middle tones. After reading the exposure values, I set the camera in manual mode and fix the focus and the WB as well. I had some pano, where the first picture on the right was very dark (only folliage), but it turned right in the final pano.

For postprocessing, I use the same workflow as you : import in LR, pick the frame representing both the main spot of interest and the best mix of highlights and shadows and adjust that frame, then I synch everything and look at the different pictures to see whether there are too many blocked shadows or burned highlights and fine tune. I use the lens profile to avoid vignetting and other distorsion. Then finally, I assemble them using Microsoft ICE (a PC app). A surprisingly good program which at that is free and allows you to upload huge composite pictures on the Photosynth.net. Compared to others the programm is very rudimentary, everthing is automated, but it is the one giving me the best results. In particular, the tones are very well adjusted, each frame blending well with the other.

To sum up, I think that the only cure to the adaptative behaviour of LR is to either avoid situations where the different frames are totally differently lighted, or to use another software like you did with Capture One.

PS : you can see some of my panos at Photosynth.net. They were just casual tests and shot handheld. I just wanted to see what the A7r can do. I'll have to return with a tripod in order to get better results. Still, I'm amazed at both the A7r and the Microsoft Ice app. (if you have Window 7 you can download it for free).

Here is one :

http://photosynth.net/view.aspx?cid=8802f837-2e43-437a-a16b-4e12ed17eb41

I metered for the light in the middle of the pano a little on the right. On the left, the slope was rather dark compared to the rest, this is why I didn't take a meter reading from there.

(the panos downloaded since April 2014 are all from the A7r. Earlier ones were taken with an Olympus E-M5 or a Canon 6D).

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rrr_hhh

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