Sony a6000 Build Quality

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parallaxproblem
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Re: Sony a6000 Build Quality
In reply to Helen, 7 months ago

Helen wrote:

parallaxproblem wrote:

Helen wrote:

most of the Minolta XG SLRs of that time had this hybrid construction, whilst the XD's used metal top plates (at least the bulk of the production, it's possible that the very late, new-style logo ones may have changed).

My XG-M had a metal top plate, if I remember, but my X-700's had (well have) plastic top plates

The XG-M kept needing to be cleaned in order to work (internal contacts forever corroding or getting dirty). For the X-700's I had to keep soldering new capacitors onto the PCB just under the top-plate as it seemed to eat them. Happy days...

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Ah yes - there were some problems with the XG and X series - including that sudden death of the camera due to a resistor that blew frequently! I got mine replaced and the replacement blew seconds after being fitted! In fact, the XG-M definitely also had a plastic top plate - it was probably plated with real chrome, though (though to my eyes, not as realistically as some of the other manufacturers, as the new-logo Minoltas had a very matte chrome finish which certainly managed to look quite paint-like). I've an XG-2 which needs its mode dial twiddling frequently to stop it going mental due to contact corrosion. It was a popular construction for the time - a polycarbonate top plate, flashed with a copper alloy (or maybe copper itself) to key it for the electroplating of the chrome top layer. Black cameras like the X700 tended to have the copper layer too but were enamelled over it. Pentax, Olympus, Nikon and Canon all used these methods (and other manufacturers).

Some of the models which retained real metal top plates nevertheless had polycarbonate baseplates metal plated this way, too.

Ah, that would explain the 'brassing' that one sees on well-used X700 top-plates (enamel has worn off), even though they are clearly plastic

XG-M had the 'new' logo - looked very modern at the time but the 'traditional' logo cameras have probably aged better styling-wise (and felt slightly better in the hands)

Hadn't heard about the resistor problem.  The capacitors were two eletrolytic ones that were mounted on the PCB near the ISO dial and stop the shutter from firing when they are broken.  A lot of X700's got scrapped for what is in fact a very easy repair 

Hadn't heard of the XG-2 (remember the XG-1 and XG-1n) but I almost bought an XG-9 in Dixons that was more-or-less an XG-M (ie. DOF button) but in an all-black old-logo case.  Kind of wish I had...

The XD bodies were beautiful, but supposedly rather unreliable (lots of electrical problems, which were inherited by the Leica R3 and successors) and too expensive for me at the time

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DUMP the HUMP! A5000 & A6000 success.... campaign for *REAL* NEX-5 and NEX-7 replacement bodies
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