One of the first pictures I ever made with a DSLR, how to get all sharp?

Started 8 months ago | Discussions thread
juvx
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Re: Ohne of the first pictures I ever made with a DSLR, how to get all sharp?
In reply to Cingen, 8 months ago

Cingen wrote:

juvx wrote:

First you need to know your tools limits. For example your camera can be perfectly sharp at ISO 1600 and even 3200. Don't be scared to use 1600 if you need to achieve a faster shutter speed. Your lens should be sharp at F11. However, some lenses are sharper than others. Don't expect miracles from a 200$ kit lens.

Obviously, if you use a tri-pod you dont need to worry about shutter speed anymore.

Honestly you should be shooting RAW as post processing is an important factor in todays photography. I personally use Lightroom and think its great. It doesnt take as long as you think. I can do a basic edit, color correction sharpening in 30 secs.

Thanks for the tips!

I really do appreciate them

My main issue is though, a picture that looks sharp to me often doesn't look sharp to other people on forums, it may be due to either my poor eyesight or lack of experience in finding flaws though.

I mainly post these samples here to have people with a good eye judge them and point out flaws I may simply not notice Once I know where the flaws (in these cases lack of sharpness) are, I may be able to train myself to recognise them better

Gotcha. Well the easiest way is to zoom in to 100% and see if the details such as leaves, grass, etc are blurry at all. Also check the background all the way in the back does it have enough detail in it and look clear or is it super blurry?

Now sometimes you want the background blurry but generally not in landscapes.

General rule of thumb to larger the aperture the more blurry (out of focus) the background. If you want EVERYTHING sharp you need a smaller aperture (F11 or smaller F16,F22). Don't worry about diffraction as much as FOCUS. Out of focus areas and camera shake are the top causes of softness in the scene. If its really bright outside use F16 or even F22.

If shooting handheld make sure VR is on and use a shutter speed pretty much double your focal length. So at 100mm use 1/200 sec. You can get away with slower of course but that' just to be safe.

when shooting at F11 or less (F16, F22) focus on an object in the scene that is between the background and foreground. something about 2/3 of the way in the distance.

read this its specific for your camera

http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2109324&seqNum=5

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