A few musings (disagreements) on the X-T1 Review

Started 8 months ago | Discussions thread
Ray Sachs
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Re: Weak little kids and poor QC...
In reply to Birddogman, 8 months ago

Birddogman wrote:

Ray Sachs wrote:

Birddogman wrote:

One of the listed "cons" is the spongy nature of the four-way controller buttons. My first XT1 (SN: 27XX) had a light leak and spongy, deeply set buttons. My replacement XT1 (SN: 81XX) has no light leak and a noticeably better feel to the buttons. Neither the light leak, nor the cure of that problem which, for me at least, included better buttons, were mentioned in the review at all. I find that strange.

Mine are pretty bad. Glad yours aren't, but this is either a bad design or a QC problem. Not a huge issue to me, but could be to others.

Another "con" is the fact that the ISO dial has a release button in the middle which must be pressed before it can be turned. To be fair, they did say that this might not bother some people due to their shooting style. From my standpoint, that locking dial is a Good Thing, not a "con". I don't change ISO all that often and having that dial turn unintentionally would be a big problem, so I very much like Fuji's implementation and would not want it any other way.

Not a huge issue either way for me, but after using the EM1 with its lockable and UNlockable button on the mode dial, I don't know why every such button isn't made like that - gives the choice to the user.

Similarly, they list the stiffness of the exposure comp dial as a "con". I disagree completely. The exposure comp dial on the XP1 was too loose and was always getting moved unintentionally. That cost me quite a number of badly exposed shots, especially with the OVF. I can easily move the exposure comp dial on the XT1 with one finger, without taking the camera away from my eye and I'm no muscle bound weightlifter. They state that it takes two fingers to move that dial - well maybe if the operator is a weak little kid with tiny hands, but any adult with even reasonable hand strength should have no problem moving it with one finger.

Much to my surprise, then, it turns out that in my mid-50's I'm now a "weak little kid with tiny hands" (that can somehow palm a basketball), but I absolutely cannot turn this dial with just my thumb, even when I exert enough pressure on it that I worry I might break the camera. Glad yours isn't like that, but mine is and I've heard from plenty of other full grown adults who can't turn theirs either. I haven't personally used one I found too loose since the original X100 - this is the first one I couldn't adjust with my thumb alone. Again, if not a bad design, then bad QC. Unlike the other two issues, this one IS a big deal to me as the exposure comp dial is a control I use a lot And this one requires taking my finger off of the shutter button to help my poor wimpy little thumb with the task.

-Ray
--------------------------------------
We judge photographers by the photographs we see. We judge cameras by the photographs we miss - Haim Zamir
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20889767@N05/

Ray:

Good grief! I meant no insult! Reading your comment about the exposure comp dial and Andy's above, I wonder if there are differing levels of tension on that dial in different copies of the camera?

Yeah, I think there were clearly some quality control issues in the early batches, as is common enough in any number of new products. I didn't really take it as an insult - just meant my sarcasm as a reminder that we should probably believe what other people tell us about THEIR experience, even if it doesn't match ours. In some cases, it's just different expectations, and likes and wants. But in other cases, it's probably a very real difference in the experience and the product being used.

I agree that an ISO dial that allows one to choose to lock it or not would be a better implementation. I didn't know that existed.

I don't know if it does on an ISO dial specifically, there being so few of them on modern cameras. But it definitely exists on similar dials (mode dials usually) on other cameras and it's an excellent feature! It certainly COULD be done on this ISO dial as easily as any other dial. Probably add a few pennies to the total cost of the camera.

All of that said, I love the TX1 and am having more fun taking pictures now than I have had in many years (since film camera days). The review talked about that, too.

I quite like it too. Probably not as much of a revelation for me because I recently had an X-Pro, XE1, and X100, and shot with the XM1 and X100s quite a bit. So I'm used to the Fuji shooting experience and image quality. At which point the XT1 is a nice evolutionary step forward, but not all that radical an improvement over the other models, particularly the XE2. It's a great camera for sure, but there were clearly some early QC issues.

BTW, just got mine back from the Fuji repair folks today for the light leak repair. The rear buttons don't feel any better (again, not an issue for me, but would be for many), but now I CAN turn the EC dial with my thumb. It's still a good deal stiffer than I like and that makes it hard to turn just one or two clicks - if I exert enough force to turn it, it may turn 3-4 clicks. But at least it's possible now and maybe it'll loosen just enough with use. We'll see...

I don't know if you've ever tried a Sony RX1. I've shot a lot of cameras in the past few years, and for pure quality of the controls, that has to be the nice piece of gear I've ever used. Everything from the aperture ring to the focus ring to the EC dial is just perfect - perfectly smooth action, perfectly damped, with perfect levels of resistance. The lens and sensor are amazing too. This should all be the case for the very high price, but that doesn't always translate these days. But in that case it did. And it was really a pleasure to use something with that level of quality throughout - never felt anything else quite that good... If it had been a 24 or 28mm focal length I'd have probably kept it until it died...

-Ray
--------------------------------------
We judge photographers by the photographs we see. We judge cameras by the photographs we miss - Haim Zamir
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20889767@N05/

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