"But at low ISO nothing can beat this camera." - CEO SIGMA Pt. 2

Started 7 months ago | Discussions thread
EthanP99
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Re: "But at low ISO nothing can beat this camera." - CEO SIGMA Pt. 2
In reply to Basalite, 7 months ago

gaussian blur wrote:

Basalite wrote:
I never claimed the Sigmas have "higher resolution" than say the D800s or the new Sony equivalent. I did say *for the amount of resolution the Sigma is capable of* the finest detail will be superior since the Foveon doesn't interpolate image data, something a Bayer sensor does.

No matter how many times you say it, it's still wrong.

Not only does Foveon interpolate, but it interpolates more than Bayer does.

The interpolation it does is different, but it's stil interpolation.

Contrary to Sigma's claims and the diagrams on their web site, the layers are not RGB. The three layers have overlapping spectra, from which RGB is derived. The transform is non-trivial and partly why the cameras and software are so slow. There's a lot of calculations going on. That means there is interpolation, or as the Sigma fanbois like to say, 'guessed'.

It's also why delta-E is higher in Foveon and why there can be metamerism and colour casts and why overexposed red can sometimes become orange.

That said, it is clear that the Sigmas deliver higher resolution, as per the Oxford definition provided, and in this case not just at the finest detail for their given resolution (megapixels), than any 24MP camera on the market, APS or 35mm sized sensor, further supporting the widely accepted claim that the current Foveon sensor is delivering resolution, as per the Oxford definition provided, at around the same resolution a 30MP Bayer sensor would, if one existed.

Not only is it not clear, but it's not possible. The number of pixels defines a hard limit as to what it can theoretically resolve, and because of aliasing, that limit remains theoretical.

No, as I said, the vast majority of Bayer sensor cameras still have blur filters.

It's an anti-alias filter, something which is required by discrete sampling systems to band-limit detail beyond Nyquist. If you omit the anti-alias filter, you will get alias artifacts, aka false details. There is no getting around this.

In other words, that detail you think the sensor is resolving was not in the original subject.

Show me then a 15MP Bayer sensor camera that can resolve as much detail asthe 15MP Foveon. Good luck. 

Dont need to, since we have 24 and 36mp to work with now.

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