What the imager has

Started 10 months ago | Discussions thread
Laurence Matson
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In reply to Laurence Matson, 10 months ago

Laurence Matson wrote:

What the imager has is 19 million spatial locations. How the pixels are counted is once again a big deal for those discussion types. I am guessing that the G and R layers each have around 5 million pixels and the top B, 19 million. Or thereabouts.

Of course, some of our favorite negativists will argue that this is not really an X3 imager. That also, is nonsense. There are 3 layers (X3) each of which collects stuff to yield a full-color reading at each spatial location. The oh-so obvious - at least to Ricardo - interpolation that has to be going on is a moot point at best. Moot on, if you want.

Finally, on the critical point of pixel-level sharpness - acuity - it is there, as always. The question really is how one could conceive it not being there. Acuity or mush, depending on the technology, is defined by the top layer. In the case of the single-layer Bayer process in all of its iterations, the mush comes from the fact that none of the pixels is acute from its neighbors. The Foveon imager pixels are. The 19 million plus acute blue pixels in the top layer define the spatial locations.

To my mind, this imager is true to the process. Just a different solution.

It may be a bit less straightforward and thus harder for some to get their heads around. Just wait for the images and duct-tape your jaws for support ahead of time.

As with all previous Foveon imagers there are layers where colors are detected. The "filtering" done in the silicon and the filtering process is really just counting electrons at each discrete location. The electrons are the "corpses" from the expired photons. Since photons carry energy in proportion to their frequency, the stronger ones will penetrate furthest and the weaker one will penetrate least. So the "blue" layer is merely a device to count how many dead photon bodies are lying around; the same goes for the "red" layer and the "green" layer.

Now comes Ricardo's famous interpolation, but not behind the tree where he thought it was hiding. Using these three discrete data points, an educated guess can be made about the color. The educated guess becomes more accurate as the imager processing is refined.

Simplistically put, this is how it works. What this means for the Quattro imager is that the data set made up of varying variables. The "blue" detectors count a narrow but smaller discrete set. The "green" and the "red" a large one.

Since the "blue" layer reads a narrower set - more discrete set - it is where acuity will be defined. It's the steak or tofuburger; the "red" and "green" add the lettuce and French dressing.

Yes, this is a simple explanations. Perhaps some engineers can parse it better. I just studied acting.

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Laurence
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