So much for the EVF being insufficient for action.....

Started 7 months ago | Discussions thread
TrojMacReady
Senior MemberPosts: 8,425
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Re: Different part of the cycle
In reply to Erik Magnuson, 6 months ago

Erik Magnuson wrote:

TrojMacReady wrote:

You already have to compensate for far more than 5 milliseconds.

Read the post above about how the brain estimates motion. Extra delay when viewing throw this off.

No, as explained above, the AF and human delay vary and their average variance is already a multitude of the rather consistent EVF delay. I have found compensating for EVF delay no harder to adjust to than just the bare shutter delay, let alone AF. YMMV.

Even prefocused with the fastest DSLR's, the shutterlag is already 40-50 milliseconds. Meaning that by the time you decide to hit the shutterbutton, the bird still moves for 40-50 milliseconds.

Exactly - but as humans have been tracking objects and predicting their future position based on direct observation for a long time; this is a problem we are well equipped to solve.

We are equally equipped to compensate for an extra few milliseconds. The bird might have changed direction, but that could have equally been the case during the cycle of shutterlag. The differences in shutterlag between different cameras is already larger than the timeframe discussed here.

Entering AF into that equation, adds another 90-250 milliseconds. And let's not overlook the largest delay, the human reaction time, usually being the longest.

I take it you don't do this type of shooting very often. It's not point and shoot, but you acquire and then follow the target. Like your brain, a good AF system will begin to do predictive tracking. You can then start shooting single or burst as you continue to track the target In the viewfinder. Yes, there is blackout but again that's a type of condition we are very well adapted to. (You dont lose the ability to track a moving object if it's behind a picket fence do you?)

You fail to realize that every sequence starts with AF delay and even during a session of predictive tracking, there is delay which can cause predictive failures of the AF system. The EVF delay is a fraction of that. The only difference is that the EVF can visually already represent the loss of connection with the subject when our own compensation for the EVF delay fails, where as the possible disconnection during shutter delay, AF delay and reaction time, will only be represented in the pictures. Which means a much more delayed or no direct feedback. Which in turn hinders improvement of compensation. With the EVF delay continually represented, your brains are offered continuous feedback. Yes, it's great if you are able to keep that bird framed in you OVF without failure during a longer period, but in the end it's about the pictures and then you can't ignore the rest of the delay cycle for reasons mentioned.

I've seen for example 2 users respectively in their 70's and 80's succesfully track and frame remote controlled jets and helicopters doing speeds in excess of a 100 mph and unpredictable stunts, all with an EVF that has about 10 ms delay. I'd say most of us shouldn't have many issues to learn to adapt too then, in an age where millions of gamers are also successfully dealing with input lag, display and internet lag (the latter 2 often have similar effects as EVF lag, but internet lag is usually less consistent) that is much greater in fast paced 3D shooters. Proving this isn't exactly magic.

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