Why EVF will never replace OVF for me

Started 11 months ago | Discussions thread
ApertureAcolyte
Contributing MemberPosts: 927Gear list
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Irrelevant, pointless test with irrelevant pointless conclusions
In reply to canonagain123, 11 months ago

canonagain123 wrote:

Since the mirrorless crusaders are relentless, here are my reasons for not going mirrorless:

Because the LCD kills my nightvision,

LCD is not EVF. The LCD cannot isolate your eyes from each other.

and I'm not ready to replace my eyeballs with a tiny LCD screen. Who knows what it would do to my nightvision in the long term. Fully adapted, I can see things that no EVF could dream of seeing.

An EVF gives you a larger view than most viewfinders of PRO DSLR bodies. It's not an LCD screen either.

And to boot, DSLR viewfinder screens suck compared to Film SLR viewfinders... did you complain about that?

I just did some testing. I closed my eyes and let them adapt for a few minutes (after making the room extremely dark, but leaving enough light for my test. I can do that, because this apartment has light sealed window shutters which give me a full control of light.) I wasn't fully adapted, but enough for my testing purposes.

I'd set the camera settings earlier so no light from the camera would enter my eyes before I'd looked around. I then looked through the viewfinder, without the green indicator lights inside, to compare what I could see through the OVF. I could see about 1/3 the light through the OVF that I could with my bare eyes. I turned on the LCD VF (instant loss of night vision, I practically went blind, I could see nothing but the LCD and the closest camera buttons) and set it to as high as it would go, f/1.4 1/30s ISO 12,800. No chance, a lot darker than the OVF. I could easily discern the white leg of the clothes drier I was looking at with my bare eyes. I could barely see it through the OVF, and not at all through the eVF (LV).

As mentioned, your "test" is irrelevant as an LCD is not an EVF, it does not isolate your eyes from each other.

If your eyes were isolated, you would not have a problem with one eye for the viewfinder, the other for night vision.

Don't blame the tool for your lack of understanding about how your eyes work.

and to be completely honest, this can be %100 technically overcome by filtering all colour to a red channel, or filtering channels to match human scotopic vision.

Both methods, won't blow your night vision.

I then took some exposures to figure out the exposure the camera needed to take to match what I saw with my eyes. The matching exposure was roughly f/1.4, ISO 3200, 10 seconds. That wasn't a correctly exposed photo (that would have required 1-2 minute exposure time) because at those light levels I don't see full brightness. It was the exposure that most closely matched what I saw. As soon as I checked the LCD preview, I went practically blind because I lost my night vision. I could see everything on the screen but hardly anything around me where it was a million times darker.

Once again, you haven't stated your camera model. Live view implementation varies wildy on cameras. On a DSLR, it is a total afterthought and certainly not a core function. You make an assumption that a poor implementation on an LCD screen carriers over onto a dedicated EVF and that's pure folly.

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