Why EVF will never replace OVF for me

Started 8 months ago | Discussions thread
Ontario Gone
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Re: Why EVF will never replace OVF for me
In reply to Erik Magnuson, 8 months ago

Erik Magnuson wrote:

Aberaeron wrote:

Fact is that you can see more through an EVF just as you see more through night-vision devices.

You might have a better grasp of the facts if you ever tried it. You can see by starlight alone where your EVF would be a noisy, laggy mess. The disadvantage is it takes time to adapt any and any brighter (except red) lit will spoil it.

Actually Eric, anything brighter won't spoil it right away. I  have a good grasp on the facts, i have studied this. Your eyes sensitivity is controlled by two factors.

  • First, there is the iris. It contracts and opens to let less or more of the pupil expose. More pupil means more light absorbed, just like a lens diaphram/sensor. The iris will, in dark environments, fully open within a few seconds.
  • Second, the rods that make up the retina within your eye. This is what takes time, as their sensitivity levels are not quick changing, thanks to the chemical process that is vision. Usually within 1-3 minutes, that's how long it takes for the human eye to adjust. 

Now, contrary to what you claim above, any brighter light will not spoil it. The rods in the retina take time to move back to "less sensitive" just like they take time to move to "more sensitive". This is why walking out to a sunny day after you just wake, your eyes hurt and for more than just 1 second. In reality, in a dark adjusted environment, a quick bright light will not spoil the 3 minute adjustment period. likely the iris will contract to block the light, and as long as it doesn't last too long, within a few seconds you are back to "sensitive".

Of note is how the center portion of your vision is less capable in low light. This is because the center of your retina is highly concentrated with cones, the color sensative cells, and here there are far less rods, the luminance sensitive cells. Looking 5 or 10 degrees off your subject allows much better luminance vision, as this offers the proper angle of light to hit the area of your retina with more rods. But im sure you and the OP already know this.

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