Would you call this pixel peeping:

Started 9 months ago | Discussions thread
Wayne Larmon
Veteran MemberPosts: 9,268
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In reply to Prognathous, 9 months ago

Prognathous wrote:

Beachcomber Joe wrote:

If your images "contains multiple subjects and many interesting details" I wonder why you did not consider those aspects of the image worth their own photographs. I would think that going from an overall photo to well composed photos of the interesting bits would make for a far more pleasing presentation.

One typical reason is that these multiple subjects are not static, so you can't actually capture the same moment in multiple shots.

Another reason is that slowly panning within a magnified image works differently on the viewer than showing a series of static shots. I'm not saying one is always better than the other, but it's a different (and sometimes preferable) way to present the interesting parts of a scene. This is very common when displaying a panorama. I find that showing the whole image and then displaying it in high magnification and panning slowly from one side to the other frequently provides a more compelling presentation than just showing additional images of specific parts of the panorama.

You are defining a problem that has no easy solution. In this post, you say that you need to zoom and pan in order to provide a more "compelling presentation". But in your original post, you said

I use the same technique people use when pixel peeping (100% magnification), and if image quality is lacking it's tough for me not to notice it, though I don't tend to point to technical shortcomings.

It appears that you need a substantial upgrade to your equipment (FF camera with professional quality lenses, etc.  Or to medium format, if you are now using FF.), so that when you zoom images enough to show the details you need to show, that they won't show "technical shortcomings."

Or you could do what I do.  When I have an image that I know contains detail that warrants zooming, I make a copy and crop enough so that the detail is apparent when displayed full screen.  (I don't crop so much that the image will end up at 100% when displayed on a two megapixel 1080P HDTV.  That is a lot of cropping.  Or zooming.)  And then save the copy with a slightly different name.  This way there is no zooming during the presentation.  And it works when the images are printed as 4x6s.

But if you want to have your cake and eat it too (be able to zoom and pan without exhibiting technical shortcomings), you need to upgrade your equipment.  No?

Wayne

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