Fuji X-E2 image problems

Started Nov 10, 2013 | Discussions thread
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Re: Fuji X-E2 image problems
In reply to bigpigbig, Nov 12, 2013

bigpigbig wrote:

stimpy wrote:

bigpigbig wrote:

According to wikipedia:

"In digital photography, the raw file plays the role that photographic film plays in film photography. Raw files thus contain the full resolution (typically 12- or 14-bit) data as read out from each of the camera's image sensor pixels."

This would imply no noise reduction in the RAW file. Simply data from each photosensitive site. Covered with a RGB filter then light converted to electrical charge and quantified.

stimpy wrote:

They all apply NR but not to this degree. It certainly seems to be worse with the X-E2 in my experience. It doesn't help that my wife has freckles...

It doesn't imply that at all. That data gets manipulated to the RAW file by Fuji, nobody will ever know for sure but most experts agree they add a decent amount of noise reduction to their raws.

Could you post a link to one of these experts, please? I would like to learn how they think this happens.

How would you think that is happening? A RAW file contains only data from each photosensitive site (RGB). Noise happens at the pixel level. Pixels are created by interpreting this data (Demosaicing).

Reading this might help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demosaicing

Here you go

Shooting pictures in RAW gives DSLR users the opportunity to fine-tune their settings, by potentially controlling every step of the RAW conversion. Users often assume that RAW images are directly output from the sensor without any additional processing, but is this really the case? What kind of processing can be applied and what kind of influence does it have on the final image?

Most noise occurs at the pixel level and can be considered as statistically white (meaning that each individual pixel’s noise is independent from other pixels’ noise) and identically distributed. However, there is another kind of noise, usually less common, that violates this “statistically white” rule. It is noise due to irregularities on the sensor, and thus has a fixed position.

Read more: http://www.dxomark.com/Reviews/Half-cooked-RAW

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