Making a superzoom for a compact is easy, but for a DSLR, it's hard?

Started Oct 7, 2013 | Discussions thread
Leandros S
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Re: Understanding demand curves
In reply to headfirst, Oct 8, 2013

headfirst wrote:

Leandros S wrote:

headfirst wrote:

the CN-E30-300mm is a professional video/cine lens - high quality, high R&D/tooling cost & very low production nos. to recover it.

That explanation is backwards and doesn't satisfy.

No, it's not. The CN-E30-300 is a specialist lens (it's not a travel zoom) & even if they were a 10th of the price they probably wouldn't sell appreciably more (in fact most users will probably rent rather than buy). It weighs nearly 6Kg & it has a front diameter of over 130mm - there are a lot of heavy glass lenses in it that probably take up to a year to form, polish etc.

You don't get a Ferrari for the price of a Yugo.

Maybe this would suit you better? http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup/ef_28_300mm_f_3_5_5_6l_is_usm

Yeah, Brian already brought up the Tamron covering that same range. I haven't been finding a lot of reviews other than amazon for those lenses yet - are they generally regarded as sharp with minimal distortion throughout the range? I'm actually also interested in getting the answer to the original question though - I can see that 28-300mm and 18-200mm (APS-C) might be easier to accomplish than the apparent current gold standard of 18-270mm, but of course all of them are some way from what has been done with smaller sensors in bridge cameras.

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