zuiko 75mm f1.8 with panny 35-100mm?

Started 11 months ago | Discussions thread
EarthQuake
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Re: zuiko 75mm f1.8 with panny 35-100mm?
In reply to MikeGre, 11 months ago

MikeGre wrote:

Is getting the panny 35-100mm f2.8 and zuiko 75mm f1.8 overlapping too much? I realize the price point on both and that is a main reason i ask. I want really good macro and good bokeh. Because the 75mm is f1.8 the bokeh will be good. Not sure if the 75mm is great at macro. I dont see it listed as macro lens. Thanks

Min focus distance of the 75mm is 84cm, min focus with the 35-100mm is 85cm, you would be better off with the Olympus 60mm 2.8 if you want macro, which is a proper macro lens and focuses to 18cm.

The 75mm is a very nice lens, the only question is 1 and 1/3rd stop on a lens that is of very specific use worth an extra $850 to you? Thats not really a question anyone else can answer for you.

The 45/1.8 is cheaper and probably a more versatile lens for every day portrait work and such, whereas the 75mm is going to be very long in some situations (ie: pretty much only useful for headshots indoors or in cramped spaces).

BTW, bokeh = the quality of the blur, not the amount. Bokeh has nothing to do with lens speed/aperture. What you mean is depth of field, which is generally refereed to as narrow (small amount in focus, blurry background) or wide (very much in focus).

For headshots and head/shoulders, even waist up shots the 45/1.8 will generally provide adequately narrow DOF. If you want full body shots with narrow DOF, the 75/1.8 will be better, the tricky thing will be finding situations where you have enough space to get a full body shot with a 150mm equiv. lens.

Generally, more than absolutely lens speed, distance to subject and distance to background is going to determine how narrow your DOF is, or how much your background is blurred, if your background is 1 foot behind your subject, an F1 lens isn't going to help much, and if your background is half a mile away, even an F5.6 lens can give you blurry backgrounds. So, a lot of it is about framing and technique more so than the specific lens you use.

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