Lurking in the EM1 is a potentially revolutionary feature

Started 11 months ago | Discussions thread
Doug Brown
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Re: Lurking in the EM1 is a potentially revolutionary feature
In reply to 3DrJ, 11 months ago

3DrJ wrote:

TrapperJohn wrote:

I was just going over the dpr preview again, and saw the beginning of something that's rather fascinating.

It's the enhancement to diorama mode, something I've played with on the EM5. This one uses the recorded focus point as the point of maximum sharpness, so you don't have to manually select the in focus area. Diorama mode increases detected blur from that point. Or, in other words, cutting DOF in software.

A similar thought traversed my brain when I read about the "diorama mode" in connection with the E-M1 launch. Apparently the added option is the static element can now be horizontal (as before) or vertical, which is how the portrait was made.

So the vertical area in the central part of the picture is undisturbed, but progressive blur is applied toward the lateral edges. That's what I'm remembering anyway.

Inevitably, just like distortion correction, etc., "bokeh" will be available by software processing of the image. Once perfected, the effect will forever alter conversations about "DOF control", and likely enough all but eliminate the need for "FF" cameras in all but the most specialized applications.

It's coming. I predict that in a just few years, tiny sensors will rule.

Jules.

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Artists must not only see, but see what they are seeing.

At the Olympus E-M1 demo they showed a portrait with both the new Diorama and Pale Light filters combined that was quite effective.

I haven't seen DPR's sample but the Diorama filter by itself is a bit punchy and contrasty for portraits. Perhaps a combination of effects is the way to go?

Douglas Brown

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