Photographer faces law suit

Started Aug 23, 2013 | Discussions thread
jrtrent
Veteran MemberPosts: 3,417
Like?
Re: Christ commanded to render unto Caesar what is Caesar's.
In reply to santamonica812, Sep 9, 2013

santamonica812 wrote:

But, as a society, we have decided as a group (ie, through passing anti-discrimination laws) that the advantages of giving photographers (bakers, et al) this freedom is outweighed by the rights of gays (women, minorities, religious groups, etc) to be free from discrimination.

You may disagree with this societal judgment. I STRONGLY support your right to not only disagree, but your right to loudly and repeatedly object, and for you right to encourage us to change/revoke these anti-discrimination laws. Similarly, I am sure you encourage me and others to--just as loudly and repeatedly--to argue for a position that is opposite yours. I take this position knowing that I will lose a bit of my freedom to pick my clients. But all those people in those many disadvantaged groups will gain the extra freedom of being safe from discrimination in their day-to-day non-religious lives, and--on balance--that seems a fair trade-off to me.

Some people see legal sanctions against unnatural and immoral behavior to be a kindness, not only for society as a whole but also for individuals tempted to engage in such behavior.  This issue poses a difficult dilemma for people providing a public service.  For someone believing that an act such as abortion is wrong and should be illegal, can they work as a taxi driver, knowing that there may be times they'll be dropping off a pregnant woman at an abortion clinic?  Since 2003, bakers, photographers, caterers, etc., in New Mexico are expected to provide direct services to aid in the celebration of something (homosexual unions) that they not only find personally abhorrent but also recognize as ultimately destructive to those engaged in it.  The loving thing is to refuse service, a message reminding the potential customer of the evil they are about to do, yet if they want to continue in their chosen profession, they must perform the service asked of them.

Unlike performing abortions or selling pornography, there's nothing inherently wrong with baking cakes, serving food, taking pictures, or driving someone to a destination--it's the event you're doing that for or the destination you're taking someone to that creates the problem, and under current laws, you're not free to pick and choose your clients.

Everyone's circumstances and motivations may be different, and I could have as much respect for the photographer that chose to follow the law the accept the assignment as for the photographer that decided to close his business or move to another state.  I don't have any easy answers, but, like you, I do have empathy for people who find themselves in this moral dilemma.

Reply   Reply with quote   Complain
Post (hide subjects)Posted by
Keyboard shortcuts:
FForum PPrevious NNext WNext unread UUpvote SSubscribe RReply QQuote BBookmark post MMy threads
Color scheme? Blue / Yellow