Windows 8 Home cannot map to NAS Folder

Started Aug 3, 2013 | Discussions thread
Jim Cockfield
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Re: not hard to believe
In reply to Jim Cockfield, Aug 3, 2013

P.S.

IRT my last post, what you'll find is that LIiux is only the underlying kernel, and there are many different Window managers available (LXDE, Gnome, KDE, etc.) with completely different looks and feels.

Anyway, if you get tired of Microsoft making changes to Windows that impact compatibility with your NAS, I'd suggest experimenting with some of the popular Linux distributions.

Here's a review of LInux Mint (using the Cinnamon desktop, which is only one of many choices available for it) that I mentioned in my last post.

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/linux-mint-olivia-cinnamon.html

Personally, I prefer linux distributions using a KDE desktop instead (see http://www.kde.org/ for more info). See this thread for some screen captures showing Kubuntu using it:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/41502125

But, for someone brand new to Linux, I'd probably suggest looking at Linux Mint using Cinnamon, as it has most of what you'd need already preinstalled.

Anyway, if you get tired of Microsoft changing authentication parameters for interfacing with your NAS with new Windows versions, I'd strongly suggest giving one of the popular LInux distros a try (and you can easily install one in a dual boot config with Windows, so that you can select the OS you boot into each time your restart your PC).

See the screen captures in the thread I just linked to in order to get a better idea of just how easy one of the popular distros is to use (and you'd have software like Firefox and Chrome for Web Browser, LibreOffice and OpenOffice for docs and spreadsheets, VLC for media playback, Skype for video chats, and *lots* of apps for image editing.

This thread:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/41502125

Of course, you could use software like the free VirtualBox software from https://www.virtualbox.org/ (as shown in that thread) to easily test drive different Linux distros to find one that you like. Then, install it in a dual boot config with Windows (so that you can boot into either OS as desired).

It's very easy to do (you don't have to put up with Microsoft's changes if you don't want to, as there are many alternatives to Windows).  So, if you get tired of the compatibility issues with newer Windows releases, just say no.

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JimC
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